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Author Archive for Heidi Lauritzen



Waverley by Sir Walter Scott

by Heidi Lauritzen on September 18th, 2014
Waverley by Sir Walter Scott Cover Image

Until recently, the first thing that came to mind when Sir Walter Scott was mentioned is that he is one of the authors in my Game of Authors card deck.  When I heard about the exciting upcoming programs on Scott and his Waverley novels, though, I knew I had to read at least one of the novels, and I’m very glad I did.

Waverley; or, ‘Tis Sixty Years Since was published anonymously in 1814 to great acclaim; for the next thirteen years Scott continued publishing novels which were known as “by the author of Waverley” and he only officially claimed authorship of them in 1827.  Some of Scott’s better-known titles today are Rob Roy, Ivanhoe, and the long poem The Lady of the Lake.

Waverley often is called the first historical novel, and is about a young Englishman–Edward Waverley–who is posted to Scotland, and whose loyalties become torn between his English origins and the Scottish Highland clans in the Jacobite rising of 1745.  Scott is a terrific story-teller, bringing to life characters from all levels of 18th century society and painting beautiful pictures in my mind of the Highland lochs, stones and mountains.   I was prepared for the long, descriptive sentences but surprised—happily—by Scott’s dry sense of humor; I found myself smiling often as I read.  Reading Waverley now, as modern-day Scotland is voting on whether to separate from the United Kingdom, reinforces just how old and complex this quest for independence is.

Scott was a contemporary of Jane Austen and she had this to say about Scott and Waverley:  “Walter Scott has no business to write novels, especially good ones. – It is not fair. – He has Fame & Profit enough as a Poet, and should not be taking the bread out of other people’s mouths. – I do not like him, & do not mean to like Waverley if I can help it – but fear I must…”  I should have taken Austen’s word for it a long time ago.  And I will definitely read more of the Waverley novels.

Don’t miss learning more about Sir Walter Scott and the Waverley novels at ICPL’s program at noon on Friday, September 19th, and on October 5 at the Iowa City Book Festival.

The Bloomsbury Group in Food and Flowers

by Heidi Lauritzen on August 5th, 2014
The Bloomsbury Group in Food and Flowers Cover Image

I recently enjoyed two new books on England’s Bloomsbury Group.  So much has been written by and about this group of writers, painters, and thinkers, it seems a bit surprising that a new angle could be found.  But these two books are a delight, and if you enjoy gardening, cooking, or English history, check them out.

Virginia Woolf’s Garden:  The Story of the Garden at Monk’s House is written by Caroline Zoob; she and her husband lived as tenants in this National Trust property for more than ten years, nurturing the gardens and taking care of the house.  The photographs are by Caroline Arber, and they beautifully present the gardens, paths, and orchard on the property, as well as some interior shots of the house where the Woolfs lived for many years.  (I lingered especially over the the pictures of Leonard’s and Virginia’s writing tables.)  Mixed in with these current photos are archival pictures of the Woolfs and their guests in the gardens.  The text describes the extensive work that the Woolfs (primarily Leonard) did to create garden rooms, develop the orchard, and grow food for their table–which was often shared with guests.

The Bloomsbury Cookbook:  Recipes for Life, Love and Art by Jans Ondaatje Rolls is a little more story and a little less recipes, but that’s ok.  The book nicely summarizes the chronology and personalities of the Bloomsbury Group through anecdotes and the recipes of its members (and their cooks).  You will find the Woolfs here, and Vanessa and Clive Bell, and Lydia Lopokova Keynes, Dora Carrington, and Lytton Strachey, to name just a few.  Some of the recipes are more atmospheric than utilitarian (where would I find a calf’s brain?) but some of the vague measurements have been updated and there is a chart at the back that provides temperature conversions from centigrade to Fahrenheit, and imperial measurements to metric.  The many illustrations, most of which are paintings by members of the Group, are another highlight of the book.

Browsing New Materials…Online!

by Heidi Lauritzen on July 15th, 2014

Any new books at the Library?  There’s a quick answer for that, on the front page of the catalog.  Once a week–usually on Tuesday–the list of materials just added to the Library collections is updated.  Not all sections will have something every week, but most do and sometimes the lists are quite long.  Just click on the “New Materials Lists” link to get started.

New Materials ListThe New Materials Lists page is easy to search and browse:  it first is divided into Adult, Teen and Children’s collections, with more sub-categories listed below those headings. If you like Adult Fiction, you can limit your browsing to just Mysteries or just Large Print books.  If Nonfiction is your first choice, the list is separated by the Dewey Decimal classification numbers:  100/200/300 and so on.  I routinely check the 900s and Biography, because I like reading about history and travel.  And then I check the DVD TV section, because I’m hooked on a number of British TV series.  And then it’s on to the Mysteries…

Most formats are represented, including DVDs, music compact discs, books on disc, and eBooks and eAudio. The display of the book cover (or DVD cover, or CD cover) beside the title is helpful, and there’s a direct link to the regular catalog entry where you can place a hold if you wish.

The majority of the items on the list are newly-published, but you will also see other things new to our collection even if they were published several years ago.

It’s a great way to browse our virtual New shelves.  Check back once a week!

Stories from the National September 11 Memorial Museum

by Heidi Lauritzen on June 17th, 2014
Stories from the National September 11 Memorial Museum Cover Image

I believe most of us remember where we were on September 11, 2001, when four planes were turned into weapons and crashed into the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers, the Pentagon, and the Pennsylvania countryside.  I was already at work here at the Library when I became aware of a group of staff clustered around a television in our audiovisual services area.  When we realized the magnitude of what was happening we opened our big meeting room to the public, showing the ongoing news coverage on the big screen there.  In the Library’s annual report for that year, Director Susan Craig described what it was like:  “It was incredible to sit in the darkened room and watch the news with strangers, some in small groups, most just individuals.  When I was there no one actually spoke, but I felt a connection with everyone in the room.”

The Stories They Tell:  Artifacts from the National September 11 Memorial Museum reconnects us to the events that day and the long recovery process that followed.  The Museum is part of the September 11 memorial site where the Twin Towers once stood.  The pictures in this book are simple but evocative.  The essays which accompany them—more like letters to the reader—are written by staff members of the Museum.

Many of the artifacts in the Museum are from the crash sites; others include the transcripts from phone calls from people on the planes, missing-person posters that blanketed New York City, and the Memorial Urn, with the names of the 2,977 victims on it, created by ceramicist Tom Lane.

It is difficult to choose just one or two examples to tell you more about.  Should it be the recording of flight attendant Betty Ong’s hijack report?  Or Karyn’s flight attendant wings, or the Last Column at Ground Zero, or patrol dog Sirius’s leash, or the wreckage of Engine 21 of the Fire Department of New York?

Each story brought goose bumps or tears, and often both.  The professionalism of the flight attendants on the planes and the emergency responders on the ground, the many expressions of compassion and generosity during the tragedy and in its aftermath are unforgettable reminders of the prevailing goodness in humanity.  If you are unable to visit the Museum in person, this book is the next best way to witness that.

Beatrix Potter, Gardener

by Heidi Lauritzen on April 15th, 2014
Beatrix Potter, Gardener Cover Image

Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life is a pleasure in three parts:  a biographical summary of Potter’s life; a look at her gardens by season, through her writings, paintings and period photographs; and finally, detailed lists of all the plants that appeared in her children’s books and in her gardens.  If you want to create Mr. McGregor’s garden in your own backyard, this book will tell you what to plant.

The book’s greatest strength is the illustrations that appear on almost every page.  There are contemporary photos of Hilltop, Potter’s home in England’s Lake District, as well as many black-and-white period photographs of her childhood in London and her later farming life in the Lake Country.  Many of her watercolors and ink drawings are included, from her early botanical drawings of fungi to the illustrations she created for her books for children to the later sketches of her farm animals and countryside around her.

The story of Beatrix Potter’s life is briefly told, but the notable events are all here.  Author Marta McDowell does a nice job of including enough information about the social mores and historical events of the time to show us just how extraordinary Potter was as an author, landowner, preservationist, wife and farmer.

Potter the gardener is quite recognizable.  She liked to share plants with neighbors and friends, and occasionally was guilty of taking a snip of something without express permission.  She planted vegetables and flowers, and tended fruit trees too.  When she was a child, Beatrix Potter had many animals as companions and her love for animals was evident throughout her life, but Potter the gardener did despair over the damage that rabbits and birds could do to her gardens.

It is arguable which is Beatrix Potter’s greater legacy:  her Tales of Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny, Jemima Puddle-Duck and all the others, or her gift of over 4,000 acres of Lake District farms and hills to the National Trust.  Her gift to the Trust allows us to still see the landscapes and plants and creatures that are so captivating in her children’s books written more than a century ago.  Check out Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life, enjoy the wonderful photos and watercolors, and see how many ways there are to admire this amazing woman.

There’s Help for Reading Old Documents

by Heidi Lauritzen on April 14th, 2014

Recently I joined several other  ICPL staff members who attended the Public Library Association conference.  We were in the unfortunate position of having to choose just one session from ten or twelve in each time slot, but a lucky choice I made was a session on helping genealogists–both experienced and brand-new ones–use public library resources.  My favorite tidbit from that session was the discovery of the handwriting tutorials in FamilySearch.

Scandinavian Gothic Script

FamilySearch is produced by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), and searches genealogical records worldwide including the International Genealogical Index, and census and other vital statistics sources.  You can find a link to it among the online resources on our website in the Biography, History and Genealogy category.  FamilySearch provides many tutorials on doing genealogy, for all levels of experience.

If you have ever looked at original source documents, such as census forms or ship passenger lists or church records, you know that reading old-fashioned handwriting can be difficult.  When those documents are in other languages, the challenges increase exponentially.  The FamilySearch tutorials on the scripts of many languages–including English–can help.  Pictured above and below are examples of Scandinavian Gothic.  The tutorials are self-guided, and usually incorporate opportunities for practice.

To access the tutorials, you do need to create an account within FamilySearch.  There is no charge to do so.  You can find the handwriting lessons under Get Help/Learning Center Video Courses; it’s easiest to then search by the country you are interested in.

Scandinavian Gothic, Similar Letters

Placing Holds on Available Items

by Heidi Lauritzen on March 10th, 2014

Did you know that you can place a hold on a book or a movie, even if the catalog says it is checked in?  About a year ago, we introduced the ability to place holds on available items and it has been a service that has grown steadily in use.  Here’s how it works:

Searching the catalog from home, you find just the item you are looking for and see that it is checked in.  You simply click on “Request it” (in Catalog Pro) or “Place a Hold” (in Catalog Classic) and supply your library card number and password when prompted.  You may have up to eight holds on your account at a time.

We run a report every few hours that we are open that gives us a list of the holds placed on available items; a staff member then takes that list and heads out to the stacks to retrieve those materials.  They are checked in to “trap the hold”–a step which assigns the item you requested to your account.  We then send you a Hold Pickup Notice to verify that the item was found and is ready for you to pick up from the public Hold Shelves on the first floor.  You have six days in which to pick up your hold.

We have heard from happy library patrons that this service saves time:  they can do do their browsing  and selections from home, and then make a quick trip into the Library to pick up the materials that are waiting for them.hold shelf 3 (3)

 

 

 




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