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Author Archive for Katherine Habley



BLUE ON BLUE by Dianne White

by Katherine Habley on March 12th, 2015
BLUE ON BLUE by Dianne White Cover Image

Soon it will be April and I’ll be pulling out my folder for my favorite rainy day stories in preparation for a library storytime or an outreach storytime at any one of a number of community preschools and day care sites.  A new picture book is a perfect addition to toddler and preschool storytimes and for any parent whose child might be fearful of a thunderstorm.  Blue on Blue is Dianne White’s first book.  It is written in a rhyming text that is short and sweet.  The book depicts a day that is bright and beautiful until a storm comes along with rain, thunder, and lightning.  By late afternoon the little girl takes her umbrella outside and the sun peeks out from behind the rain clouds.  The dogs go outside to play and the pigs roll happily in the mud.  The mother and baby watch the sunset, the father washes the dogs in the trough, and finally it is time to go back inside for a bath and bedtime.  How fortunate for a first-time author to be paired with the Caldecott Award winner illustrator, Beth Krommes.  As in The House in the Night, Krommes employs the technique of scratchboard and watercolor to create realistic, detailed artwork that is within the realm of a young child’s understanding of the world.  Each beautiful spread has familiar objects in each scene depicted.  By the front door we see a red tricycle, a jump rope, an umbrella stand, a basket of laundry and a bag of clothespins, a ball, and a cat looking in while the puppy looks out.  Those same objects are later seen in another image outside.  The father tills the soil from a distance with the horses out in the field, and then drives the tractor into the barn and rounds up the horses while his daughter hides with her doggie under the covers upstairs in her bed.  Turtles, ducks, flowers, lightning bugs, stars, and a toad are other things that will be fun for a small child to point out when the story is shared with an adult.  What a happy combination of story and illustrations that mesh together beautifully.  Enjoy!

SMICK! by Doreen Cronin

by Katherine Habley on March 12th, 2015
SMICK! by Doreen Cronin Cover Image

A book on the New Shelf that caught my eye is entitled Smick! and written by the author of many ridiculously funny picture books like Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type, Diary of a Worm, and Giggle, Giggle, Quack. This one is very short with only a couple of words per page that often rhyme.  There is a dog named “Smick” who plays with a stick and cavorts with a chick.  The illustrator is Juana Medina, a Colombia native and graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design.  She now lives and works in Washington, D.C., and teaches at the Corcoran College of Art + Design.  Her spare artwork is done in mixed media.  The dog is drawn in what looks like black crayon; the stick looks like a photograph; and the chick appears like a red and yellow photo of a flower petal with black crayon features.  This simple story and pictures is a delightful picture book that has already proven to be a hit in storytime.  All the white space on the pages combined with the artwork demonstrates that less is definitely more. Check out Cronin’s newest offering and sit back and enjoy all the laughs with the toddler and preschool set.

On the Wing by David Elliott

by Katherine Habley on March 3rd, 2015
On the Wing by David Elliott Cover Image

In the past I’ve enjoyed David Elliott’s books of short poems for young children (On the Farm, In the Wild, and In the Sea) illustrated by Holly Meade.  In his newest book, On the Wing, his poems are illustrated by first-time picture book artist, Becca Stadtlander.  Here, the 16 poems included are all about different kinds of birds such as the bald eagle, the hummingbird, the Caribbean flamingo, the Australian pelican, and the great horned owl.  In free verse the avian-inspired poems are short and sweet and meant to be read aloud.  Take the concise poem entitled, “The Puffin.” “The puffin/is unique–especially/it’s beak.”  Or how about “The Macaw” verse: “The Macaw/Who spilled the paint?”  I can just hear kids laughing at that one when they see the colorful gouache illustration of this particular bird.  All of the pictures are a double-spread design and the print is large for young readers to read on their own. The artwork for the cardinal poem and the Japanese cranes poem are particularly lovely.  Introducing preschoolers and primary grade children to brief poems helps them with language development and sparks their imagination. Books like On the Wing make a perfect introduction to poetry beyond nursery rhymes.  Check out all of David Elliott’s neat picture books of verse and have fun sharing them with little ones.  You can find this book on the New Book shelves in the Children’s Room of the Iowa City Public Library.

Happy Birthday Madame Chapeau by Andrea Beaty

by Katherine Habley on February 27th, 2015
Happy Birthday Madame Chapeau by Andrea Beaty Cover Image

I love hats!  I started wearing hats in my 20′s when I was in college.  I’m not talking about knitted wool hats, I’m talking fancy straw and felt hats that I would wear to complete my outfit.  I still wear hats and am almost ashamed to admit that I have nearly 200 hats that are in boxes carefully organized and labeled so I can find just the one I want to wear to church on Sunday mornings.  I love wearing hats to tea parties and I always take a couple of packable hats when I travel to give me flexibility to dress up an outfit.

As a children’s librarian, one of the best things about my job is doing storytimes for preschoolers, whether in the library or at one of our 40+ day cares and preschools we visit regularly.  I always have a theme and hats has been a favorite storytime subject; kids love the hats I bring for show and tell.

A fairly new picture book that I was happy to discover is right up my alley.  Happy Birthday Madam Chapeau by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts is one that I can’t wait to read aloud to 3-6 year-olds.  The rhyming text tells of a milliner who makes all kinds of fabulous hats but is lonely.  Once a year she dresses up and puts on a special hat and treats herself to dinner at the finest Parisian restaurant to celebrate her birthday.  This year, as she’s walking to town to dine, a crow steals her birthday bonnet!  Many onlookers offer her their hat to wear but she declines each one until a little girl offers Madame Chapeau a hat she has knitted.  The illustrations are quite humorous and extend the text very nicely; David Roberts was a former milliner before illustrating children’s books and his knowledge of one-of-a-kind designer hats is evident.  There is plenty for children to discover in the pictures that celebrate the joy of ribbons, baubles, bows, and veils.  Have fun sharing this one!

 

The Iridescence of Birds; a Book About Henri Matisse

by Katherine Habley on February 26th, 2015
The Iridescence of Birds; a Book About Henri Matisse Cover Image

A new picture book biography by Patricia MacLachlan is special in every way.  The reviews have been great and it’s no wonder.  The text is spare and suitable for K-3.  I love how the author has made a book about a famous artist accessible for young children. The book begins, “If you were a boy named Henri Matisse who lived in a dreary town in northern France where the skies were gray and the days were cold and you wanted color and light and sun….”  We learn how he added vivid color to his surroundings and noticed with an artist’s eye the lovely things around him.  Encouraged  by his beloved mother, Henri learned to observe color, light, texture, and beauty. He loved the china plates his mother painted, the bright red rugs she hung on the walls, the fruit and flowers his mother brought home for him to arrange on the table, and the beautiful silk clothes the townspeople wore.  Henri especially loved raising pigeons and observing how the sun made their feathers look iridescent in the light creating a shimmering effect.  MacLachlan says it is no surprise that Matisse grew up to be a fine painter. The seed was planted in his youngest years when his mother gave him a set of paints to mix and notice the wonderful colors he could make on paper.  The artwork in The Iridescence of Birds is by Hadley Hooper.  After much research she decided to use relief printing.  Hooper cut the characters and backgrounds out of stiff foam and cardboard, inked them up, made the prints, and then scanned them into Photoshop.  The results are fabulous!

 matisseIn his old age, Matisse turned to paper collage and cutting with scissors became his mode of expression.  Another terrific picture book about his life is entitled, Henri’s Scissors, written and illustrated by Jeanette Winter.  She focuses on the artist’s later years when he was confined to a bed and a wheelchair.  Here Matisse is depicted using colored paper and scissors and employing his vivid imagination to create artwork that his assistants put up on the walls of his seaside cottage.  “A pair of scissors is a wonderful instrument,” says Matisse.  He wonders why he never thought of using the technique of paper cutting for his designs earlier.  In this book the pictures Winter creates are done in acrylics and cut paper.

Both books would pair nicely together and art teachers will find these titles useful in their classrooms.  Parents will enjoy sharing them with their young children to foster their own creativity….and maybe give them a set of paints after reading the books together!  Both books also include author’s notes with further information about Henri Matisse and suggestions for reading.

Out of My Mind by Sharon M. Draper

by Katherine Habley on September 2nd, 2014
Out of My Mind by Sharon M. Draper Cover Image

Two-time Coretta Scott King Award winning author, Sharon M. Draper, has written a stunning novel for upper-elementary school children that opens like this:  “Words have always swirled around me like snowflakes–each one delicate and different, each one melting untouched in my hands.  Deep within me, words pile up in huge drifts.  Mountains of phrases and sentences and connected ideas.  Clever expressions.  Jokes.  Love songs …. But only in my head.  I have never spoken one single word.  I am almost eleven years old.”  So begins the story of fifth grader Melody Brooks who has cerebral palsy but doesn’t want to be defined by it.  Although she can’t walk, talk, feed herself, or go to the bathroom without help, she can read, think, remember, and feel.  She is a brilliant girl trapped in her own weak body and confined to a wheelchair.  Melody learns of a computer with technology that will allow her to communicate to others and her world changes big time!  But there are still ignorant doctors, thoughtless teachers, and cruel classmates to deal with.  Fortunately, Melody has a fierce advocate in her mother, not unlike the author whose own daughter has cerebral palsy, thus providing great authenticity and accuracy in the writing.  This book is a compelling read that will hopefully make all readers more compassionate and understanding toward those with disabilities and the misconceptions that go with them.  I especially loved Melody’s sense of humor and fortitude despite her many challenges.  This is one book you won’t be able to put down until you come to the final page.

Counting By 7′s by Holly Goldberg Sloan

by Katherine Habley on August 25th, 2014
Counting By 7′s by Holly Goldberg Sloan Cover Image

Twelve-year-old Willow Chase has had trouble fitting in her whole life because she is a genius, a person of color, unusual, and adopted.  Her parents provide much love and support despite Willow’s idiosyncrasies and mild obsessive compulsive disorder (she counts by sevens to help calm herself down and has a fixation about medical issues).  Finding a friend has never been easy, but meeting Mai Nguyen who accompanies her brother to his counseling sessions, prior to Willow’s own hour with the inept Dell Duke, changes things and the girls build a unique friendship together.  When the unthinkable happens, the car crash that kills Willow’s adoptive parents, Willow goes to stay in the garage behind the nail salon that Mai’s mother owns.  The social worker insists that this is just temporary until she can be moved to a facility that can deal with someone who has twice lost her parents and must fine another place to live.  Finding a “new normal” amid a Vietnamese family living just barely above the poverty level creates an opportunity for Willow to change other people’s lives while finding stability and her own unique place in society.  The strong characterizations, the different voices used in the storytelling, and the plot through which Willow finds meaning and acceptance again, create a special novel that will definitely hold the interest in 5th-8th grade readers.

THE SCRAPS BOOK by Lois Ehlert

by Katherine Habley on August 18th, 2014
THE SCRAPS BOOK by Lois Ehlert Cover Image

Lois Ehlert has long been a favorite picture book author/illustrator of mine.  Her books are perfect for storytimes with their large beautiful collage illustrations and short text. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting this Milwaukee children’s book author a couple of times and she is just as colorful in her dress and lively in her conversation as you would expect from her artwork.  She collects folk art from her travels and many of those items like fabric and toys from other countries are found in her picture books.  Her latest book, The Scraps Book; Notes from a Colorful Life, is a delightful insight into her creative process when making picture books for children.  The reader learns a little about her life and sees photos of her parents, the house she grew up in, early sketches of some of her books, tools she uses to create her artwork, and some of her actual collections– fishing decoys, folk art dolls, items from the natural world.  The collage of photos on the end papers are inspirational for young artists as is her simple text with notes throughout that makes reading this book pure joy.  The Scraps Book is a unique autobiographical picture book that will be enjoyed by young artists and readers, not to mention art teachers and parents.  Hurray for creativity and inspiration for children to make their own art and learn about bookmaking in the process by a very gifted artist.

Little Poems for Tiny Ears by Lin Oliver

by Katherine Habley on April 23rd, 2014
Little Poems for Tiny Ears by Lin Oliver Cover Image

I wrote a Press Citizen article about new poetry books for children earlier this month in honor of National Poetry Month, but there is another title I want readers to know about on our New Book shelves in the Children’s Room.  Little Poems for Tiny Ears is a collection of short poems for babies and toddlers written by Lin Oliver and illustrated by the one and only Tomi dePaola.  This lovely book celebrates the everyday things that delight little ones and is the perfect introduction to the bouncy, playful sound of poetry. The beloved artwork of dePaola perfectly matches the short verses and depicts children of many races.  Some of the topics covered in individual poems are toes, walking, in my stroller, my nose, dogs, my car seat, my high chair, peekaboo, diaper time, cats, bath, blankie, and my belly button. Of course, I also recommend any of the library’s books of Mother Goose rhymes for this age.  Oliver’s book would make a great new baby gift, and in fact, I am going to buy a copy for my new grandson and take it with me when we visit him in Oregon next month!  Enjoy the special bond of sharing this book snuggled up with your precious little one.

Water Sings Blue: Ocean Poems

by Katherine Habley on April 3rd, 2013
Water Sings Blue: Ocean Poems Cover Image

Celebrate National Poetry Month by reading lots of verse for children.  A new book of poems all by Kate Coombs entitled Water Sings Blue: Ocean Poems will appeal to children who love the beach.  The author grew up near the Pacific Ocean in California and she started collecting shells and writing poems as a child.  This is her first book of poetry and she has included over twenty poems celebrating the ocean in all its mystery, power, depth and beauty.  Jellyfish, coral, a sea turtle, a blue whale, old driftwood, seagulls and shells are all subjects of her verse.  The illustrations are vivid and beautiful.  Meilo So created the artwork for the text using pen and ink, brush drawing, gouache, and watercolors.  Water Sings the Blues was an American Library Association Notable Children’s Book selection for 2013.  Don’t wait to go to a sandy beach this summer–go to the shore now as you use your imagination sharing these rhyming poems with a young child.




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