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Author Archive for Kara Logsden



Do you need meeting space? The Library can help!

by Kara Logsden on May 6th, 2016

2016 05 05 Meeting RoomRecently the Library Board reviewed the Library’s Meeting Room policy and approved a couple minor changes. The Meeting Room and Lobby Use Policy provides guidelines for how the Library’s meetings rooms and Lobby are used for Library and community events and programs. It also guides how Library Staff manage this resource.  The Library has five meeting rooms.  Rooms A, B, C, and D are just off the Lobby and available hours beyond when the Library is open.  Room E is on the second floor and is available Library hours only.

According to the Policy, “The purpose of the Library’s meeting rooms is to provide space for library programs and events, to fulfill the Library’s role as a community center, where the public can attend informational, educational, cultural events and to champion the principle of intellectual freedom by providing a forum for the free exchange of ideas.”

Also, according to Policy, “Rooms are available to non-profit corporations (defined as those entities granted tax-exempt status by the IRS under section 501(c)(3) or other tax exempt sections of the Internal Revenue Code), a candidate’s campaign committee (as defined in Iowa Code §68A.102(5)), a political committee (as defined by Iowa Code §68A.102 (18), a non-profit citizen’s group that provides appropriate contact information, a governmental subdivision, or a department/division/bureau of a governmental subdivision. Rooms are not available for use as a regularly scheduled classroom or study space by educational institutions.”

The Library’s meeting rooms are very busy and many community groups depend on the Library’s Meeting Rooms. In FY15 there were 3,261 events in the Library’s meeting rooms and Lobby. Of those, 1,528 were meetings and events hosted by community groups. The rooms are used most on Tuesdays and the busiest start time for meetings is 10:00 AM.

More information about the Library’s meeting rooms is available at icpl.org/meeting-rooms. The Library’s building calendar is available at calendar.icpl.org. There’s a handy link on both pages for eligible groups to self-schedule a meeting room. Or give us a call (319.356.5200) or stop by – Library staff are happy to help with scheduling or answer any questions you have.

Summer Library Bus

by Kara Logsden on May 2nd, 2016

Do you have a Library Card? Are you ready for summer? Why do I ask?

The Summer 2013 Summer Library BusLibrary Bus program at the Iowa City Public Library kicks off on Thursday May 26th.

An Iowa City Public Library card is a child’s ticket to ride an Iowa City Transit bus FREE this summer. The Library will provide free bus rides to children through 12th grade, and the adult caregivers who are with them, on any Iowa City Transit bus route, from the day after Iowa City Schools dismiss (Thursday May 26th) until the day before school starts (Tuesday August 23), on weekdays between 9:00 am and 3:00 pm.

Bus riders should show their Iowa City Public Library card to the bus driver to gain free access to the bus.

More information about riding the bus to the Library is available at this link: icpl.org/hours-location/ride/

Information about applying for a Library Card is available at: icpl.org/cards

Three cheers for SUMMER and the SUMMER LIBRARY BUS! We’ll see you at the Library!

Music on Friday

by Kara Logsden on April 26th, 2016

M2016 04 Music on Fridayark your calendars for Friday April 29th at Noon in Meeting Room A for our final Music on Friday program from students at the University of Iowa School of Music. Two classical pieces will be performed, one by J.S. Bach and one by W.A. Mozart. The Music on Friday series is a part of Music is the Word, a nine-month series of program welcoming the University of Iowa School of Music to Downtown Iowa City.

I have to confess I am sad the Music is the Word series is winding down. Fortunately, a quick look at the MITW Schedule shows many great programs before the Finale program May 21st at 6:30 PM with Catfish Keith. My favorite part of the series has been the live music at the Library. We discovered the Library’s Lobby has excellent acoustics for live music performance and it’s fun to see the surprised look on people’s faces when they come into the Library and hear music being performed.

I have started thinking about the live music programs as “Serendipity in the Stacks.” A quick Google search for the definition of serendipity said, “the occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way.” Certainly that’s what we’ve found during the live music performances and I hope they continue beyond the Music is the Word series. Head to the Library on Friday at noon for a bit of serendipity. It’s guaranteed to make you happy.

 

 

 

 

Music on Wednesday: Mike Haverkamp

by Kara Logsden on April 25th, 2016

2016 04 Mike HaverkampCome and enjoy the toe-tapping upbeat music from local musician, Mike Haverkamp in the Library’s Lobby this Wednesday (4/27) at Noon as a part of the Music is the Word series.

Mike’s primary instrument is banjo, but he also plays guitar, Autoharp, dulcimer, banjo-uke, mandolin, and harmonica. Mike has performed in many venues and conducted workshops in songwriting, how to play the Autoharp, making connections between historical time periods and music, and building instruments from recycled objects.

On a personal note, Mike’s music always makes me smile. There’s nothing like great banjo music and complimentary vocal to make you smile and get your toes tapping to the rhythm. I’ll see you on Wednesday :)

Music on Wednesday: Notes of Spring

by Kara Logsden on April 7th, 2016

2016 02 Preucil LogoOn April 13, 2016 at Noon, Preucil School of Music staff and students return to the Iowa City Public Library for a Special Music on Wednesday program celebrating “Notes of Spring.”

Music on Wednesday is a part of the Music is the Word series welcoming the University of Iowa School of Music to Downtown Iowa City. More information about Music is the Word, including a schedule of programs, is available at www.icpl.org/mitw.

“Notes of Spring” is the fourth and final performance from the musicians from Preucil School of Music. I have especially enjoyed these performances because it’s great to take a music break during the day and I am so impressed with the passion and dedication I’ve seen from the Preucil performers. Below is a preview of the program planned for Wednesday April 13th at Noon. I hope to see you there!

2016 04 13 Preucil Program

Beware of the 3 Czech Ice Kings!

by Kara Logsden on March 28th, 2016
Beware of the 3 Czech Ice Kings! Cover Image

2016 03 Spring FlowersLonger days, spring flowers, and sunshine have me in the mood for garden planning. A little voice in the back of my head, though, has been telling me I shouldn’t get ahead of myself and to remember the Three Ice Kings my Grandmother, Mother, and Father have always warned about. I remembered to “Beware of the Ice Kings” but I couldn’t remember the details beyond they had something to do with planting tomatoes (a staple in my garden).

I was talking to a Master Gardener, who also happens to be an ICPL Reference Librarian, and asked if she’d ever heard of the Three Ice Kings. Expert sleuth she is, she found a couple articles including this one from Homegrown Iowan:

“As the story goes, the three kings or saints – Pankrac on May 12, Servac on May 13 and Bonifac on May 14 – were frozen when the temperature dropped while they were fishing at sea. On May 15, St. Zofie came along with a kettle of hot water to thaw out the three frozen kings.

The legend, brought to the United States by Czech immigrants, means that, for Iowans,  it’s a good idea to wait until May 15 to plant your tomatoes, peppers and other tender vegetables and flowers, or at least provide them with some protection in case overnight temperatures drop below freezing.”

My Grandmother is 100% Czech and first generation Iowan from Czech immigrants, so it makes sense she would know about the Ice Kings Legend.

So with a few more weeks to wait before planting, I decided a quick trip to the Library’s New Nonfiction Collection would help with garden planning. The first book I found is Vegetable Gardening in the Midwest by Michael VenderBrug. Not only does this book share a calendar for garden planning, but it also focuses on Midwest gardening issues. I especially liked the section addressing trellising tomatoes.

Foodscaping by Charles Nardozzi gives practical information about introducing edibles into regular landscaping. The pictures are great and I appreciated the information about container gardening.

Mystery writer Diane Mott Davidson’s book, Goldy’s Kitchen, weaves some of my favorite things into one book: Mysteries and Food. The Heirloom Tomato Salad recipe from her book, Fatally Flaky, looks perfect for my future tomato and basil harvest.

While I’m waiting for the Three Ice Kings, it’s nice to know I can find spring gardening inspiration at the Library.

Music on Wednesday-Susan and Greg Dirks

by Kara Logsden on March 5th, 2016

Susan and Greg Dirks grew up with music and began performing together as a duo in 2008. They compose most of their own music but also play cover songs from well-known musicians such as Eric Clapton and The Rolling Stones. Their music is an eclectic mix of folk, acoustic and folk rock.

We are honored to host Susan and Greg Dirks at the Library as a part of the Music on Wednesday series on March 9, 2016 at Noon in the Lobby.

A quote in ReverbNation about the Dirks’ music piqued my interest: “Some themes you may feel or identify in our music: love, family, friends, children, people we miss, passion, wind gently blowing through trees, water shimmering in the sunset, mountains rising majestically through clouds, the swelling expanse of the Pacific on the northern California coast, redwood forests, the Iowa countryside on a still summer night, rivers strong and gentle, shining ribbons of railroad tracks disappearing into the horizon, good books, history, selfless people doing good things.”

Music can often sweep us away. I’m looking forward to the Dirks’ music and the beautiful themes that will come alive through their performance. See you soon!

Holds @ ICPL

by Kara Logsden on March 2nd, 2016

2015 12 don't forgetWhat did Iowa City Public Library patrons do 146,917 times in Fiscal Year 2015? They placed a HOLD on a Library material. You may place a hold by logging into your account online or Library staff are happy to help you place a hold.

Holds, also known as “Reserves” are a convenient way to access Library materials. At the Library there are two different kinds of holds: Holds on materials checked out to other patrons and Holds on materials checked in and available (we’ll pull the items from the shelf for you!). You may have 10 free holds on your Library Account at any given time and, as a convenience, items stay on the Holds Shelf for 6 days to give you time to come in and pick them up.
Unfortunately, some holds are not picked up. We understand … sometimes plans change, sometimes you forget, or sometimes you are out of town. We have a new service to help you better manage your holds: FREEZE a HOLD.

2016 01 Freeze a HoldFREEZE a HOLD – what does that mean? If you requested an item, but want to delay when it is ready to be picked up, you can log in to your account and freeze the hold on that item. For example, if you are going on vacation and don’t want to miss getting your requested items, you can freeze the holds before you leave and then unfreeze them when you return. You will do this by logging into your account and indicating which holds you wish to freeze or unfreeze. There are some times when a hold may not be frozen – if you received a notice the hold was available for pick-up it is too late to freeze it at that point.

If you have questions about this new service, please stop by or give us a call.

Music on Friday School of Music Program

by Kara Logsden on February 24th, 2016

2016 02 ui school of music logoUniversity of Iowa School of Music students will present a wonderful noon-time program on Friday, February 26, 2016 in Meeting Room A. Please join us for an hour of enjoyment.

This program is free and open to the public. For a complete list of Music is the Word programs, visit www.icpl.org/mitw

Friday’s program will include:

Horn Trio in E flat Major Op.40                                  Johannes Brahms (1833 – 1897)

  1. Andante
    II. Scherzo (Allegro)
    III. Adagio mesto
    IV. Allegro con brio

Performed by: Three Oakes (Ethan Brozka, horn, Jenna Ferdon, violin, Max Tsai, piano)

Sonata No.23 Op. 57 F minor “Appassionata”      Ludwig van Beethoven  (1770 – 1827)

  1. Allegro Assai

 

Etude Op. 25 No. 10                                                            Frédéric Chopin (1810 – 1849)

Maple Leaf Rag                                                                     Scott Joplin (1868 – 1917)

Performed by: Hana Song, piano

Music on Wednesday: Anthony Arnone

by Kara Logsden on February 19th, 2016

2016 01 Anthony ArnoneA few years back I received an interesting telephone call. An Associate Professor at the University of Iowa, Anthony Arnone, wanted to play his cello in our Lobby. Arnone explained he was getting his car serviced and, instead of the waiting room magazines or donuts, why not play the cello during his wait? He had such a positive response, he started a project called “Bach to Work-Random Acts of Music,” playing his cello in unexpected locations.

We scheduled Mr. Arnone to play at 10:15 on a Monday morning, just as families were heading in for Storytime. The experience of hearing music was mesmerizing. People entering the Library stopped to listen and many children were curious about his playing.

Fast forward a couple years, and we are delighted to welcome Anthony Arnone back to the Library as a part of our Music on Wednesday series. Mr. Arnone will play his cello at Noon on Wednesday February 24th. If it is warm outside, he will play in the Lobby. If it is cold out, we’ll move the program to the Gallery on the first floor of the Library.

Cheers to “random acts of music” at the Library!




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