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Author Archive for Meredith Hines-Dochterman



ICPL announces October Classes for Adults

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on October 1st, 2014

The Iowa City Public Library wants to encourage creativity in the month of October. The computer classes offered in October will introduce patrons to free software and free online tools which can make creating a personalized card or editing a video easy and fun. Each class will last two hours, giving patrons time to ask questions and create on their own.

The Library will start things off with Beginning Graphic Design at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, October 4. Learn how to use GIMP, a free, graphic design and photo editing software, to make invitations, cards, or other graphics.

Want to enhance or correct your digital photos? Join us from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Monday, October 13, for Digital Photo Editing. Find out how to make basic corrections like red-eye removal, cropping, and sharpening blurred images.

Digital Photos: Organizing, Sharing, and Basic Editing will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, October 24. Getting all of your digital photography organized and in print worthy condition can be pretty daunting. Bring in your digital photos and learn how to batch process and tag items to quickly and easily edit and organize your images.create_interface_image

Our digital devices make it easy to capture the great moments of our lives, but making keepsakes you can share with others out of these videos can be tricky. Bring in your digital video and learn to upload and use YouTube to safely edit and share your videos online. Join us from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 28 for Editing Digital Video.

All classes for adults are held in the Library’s Computer Lab on the second floor. Classes are free, but space is limited to 10 people per program, so patrons should register early. Visit www.icpl.org/classes to register online. You can also register by calling the Library at (319) 356-5200.

Visit the Iowa City Public Library for a Historical Tour of the Longfellow Neighborhood

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on September 25th, 2014

Local history buff Tom Schulein will share the secrets of one of Iowa City’s oldest neighborhoods at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8, in Longfellow-PosterMeeting Room A.

Schulein’s “Historical Tour of the Longfellow Neighborhood” presentation will include information and images about an 1855 railroad line, a Civil War camp, streetcars, Moffitt homes, and other historical places and events that make the Longfellow neighborhood rich in local history.

Sponsored by the Iowa City Public Library and the Iowa City Johnson County Senior Center, this presentation is free and open to the public. It also will broadcast live on The Library Channel, Iowa City cable channel 10.

For more information, call the Library at (319) 356-5200.

Teen Homework Help Wednesdays at the Iowa City Public Library

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on September 25th, 2014

Teens, do you need help with your homework?Essay-Writing-Help-for-College-Students

Beginning Oct. 1, the Iowa City Public Library offers drop-in Teen Homework Help from 6 to 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Koza Family Teen Center.

Tutors from the University of Iowa will give one-on-one assistance to students in seventh- through 12th-grades. Teens are expected to bring all materials needed to complete their assignments.

Teen Homework Help won’t be offered when the University is not in session.

For more information, call the Library at (319) 356-5200.

Iowa City Book Festival Celebrates Books and Literature

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on September 24th, 2014

The Iowa City Public Library is thrilled to be one of the sponsors of the 2014 Iowa City Book Festival, which will be held Oct. 2 through Oct. 5.ICBF-logo_webheader1

Now in its sixth year, the annual celebration of books and writing leverages the unique mix of local resources that helped Iowa City earn the UNESCO City of Literature designation.

The festival will include readings and discussions at multiple locations throughout Iowa City. Below is a list of events that will be held at the Library:

Panel: Writing in a Country at War

12:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 3, in Meeting Room A

What are a writer’s duties, privileges and obligations when his or her country is at war? What should writing be when a day is measured in units of life and death—whether in the place one lives, or, as importantly, when the writer is safe from the ongoing fighting? Panelists are International Writing Program participants Mujib Mehrdad (Afghanistan), Sadek Mohammed (Iraq), and Boaz Gaon (Israel).

Author Reading: Scott Phillips and Jon McGoran

10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 4, in Meeting Room A

Authors Scott Phillips (Hop Alley) and Jon McGoran (Deadout) read from and discuss their latest books.

Author Reading: Sean Strub and Terrence Holt

11:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 4, in Meeting Room A

Authors Sean Strub (Body Counts) and Terrence Holt (Internal Medicine) read from and discuss their new books.

Irish Poetry Reading

1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4, in Meeting Room A

In this second of three programs presented in partnership with the Dublin City of Literature, three Irish poets — Siobhan Campbell, Joseph Woods, and Stephen James Smith — will read from their work.

Author Reading: Edward Carey

1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4, in the Teen Center

Edward Carey reads from and discusses his new YA novel, Heap House.

A Tribute to Donald Justice

2:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4, in Meeting Room A

Ten years after his passing, the work of Donald Justice continues to resonate. A panel of poets, led by 2013 National Book Award winner Mary Szybist reads from and discusses the work of the late poet in this special event.

Author Reading: Jessie Ann Foley

2:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4, in the Teen Center

Jessie Ann Foley will read from and discuss her 2014 Helen Sheehan YA Book Prize-winning novel, The Carnival at Bray.

Author Reading: Paddy Woodworth and Jeff Biggers

4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4, in Meeting Room A

Paddy Woodworth (Our Once and Future Planet) and Jeff Biggers (Reckoning at Eagle Creek) will read from their work and discuss the idea of regeneration as it relates to climate change.

Panel: At Language’s Edge

3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 5, in Meeting Room A

International Writing Program participants Natasha Tiniacos (Venezuela) and Sabata-Mpho Mokae (South Africa) join poet Marilyn Chin and Waukon-based translator Mary Jane White in a discussion about what it means to translate, and to have their work translated into other languages.

Panel: Religion and Writing

4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 5, in Meeting Room A

International Writing Program participants Binayak Banerjee (India), Gerður Kristný (Iceland), Enrique Serrano (Colombia), and Abdullah Al Wesali (Saudi Arabia) discuss how religious heritage shapes an author’s writing.

For a full schedule of events, visit www.iowacitybookfestival.org/schedule/.

ICPL Presents “The Name is Bond … James Bond”

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on September 22nd, 2014

Tap into your inner spy in October with the Iowa City Public Library’s “The Name is Bond … James Bond” film series.

During October, a free screening of a James Bond movie will be shown every Thursday in Meeting Room A.

Thursday, Oct. 2: Dr. NoJamesBond

Released in 1962, the first James Bond movie remains one of the best. Starring Sean Connery as James Bond, watch as the M16 agent is called to Jamaica where a colleague and secretary have been mysteriously killed. With an American CIA agent, portrayed by Jack Lord, they discover that Dr. No (Joseph Wiseman) is scheming to blackmail the U.S. government with a device capable of deflecting and destroying U.S. rockets launched from Cape Canaveral. Directed by Terence Young; 110 minutes.

Thursday, Oct. 9: Goldfinger

Sean Connery returns as James Bond in this 1964 film. This time, Bond must go to Fort Knox and stop Auric Goldfinger and his henchman from obliterating the world economy. Goldfinger not only contains many of the series’ most memorable scenes, it is the film that introduces Desmond Llewelyn as Q. Directed by Guy Hamilton; 110 minutes.

Thursday, Oct. 16: The Spy Who Loved Me

Roger Moore dons James Bond’s tuxedo in this 1977 film that introduced the steel-toothed Jaws (played by Richard Kiel) as one of the most memorable Bond villains. In this movie, Bond teams up with yet a Russian agent (Barbara Bach) to track a pair of nuclear submarines that the nefarious Stromberg (Curt Jürgens) plans to use in his plot to start World War III. Directed by Lewis Gilbert; 125 minutes.

Thursday, Oct. 23: GoldenEye

This 1995 film was a box-office success, thanks to Pierce Brosnan’s portrayal at the suave, danger-loving 007. When a deadly satellite weapon that can fire a devastating electromagnetic pulse toward Earth falls into the wrong hands, only James Bond can save the world from certain disaster, but he is up against an enemy who anticipates his every move. Directed by Martin Campbell; 130 minutes.

Thursday, Oct. 30: Casino Royale

This series reboot released in 2006 established a new timeline and narrative framework to show a less experienced and more vulnerable Bond, portrayed by Daniel Craig. On his first mission as a 00, Bond travels to Madagascar, the Bahamas and eventually to Montenegro to face Le Chiffre, a ruthless financier attempting to recapture funds in a high-stakes poker game at the Casino Royale. Directed by Martin Campbell; 144 minutes.

All films begin at 7 p.m. and popcorn will be provided.

Iowa City Public Library Celebrates Banned Books Week

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on September 22nd, 2014

Celebrate the freedom to read during Banned Books Week.

The annual event was launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, book stores, and libraries. Banned Books Week brings together all members of the book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers –- in support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas.

This year’s Banned Books Week celebration will be held September 21 through September 27.

According to the American Library Association, more than 11,300 books have been challenged since 1982. There were 307 challenges reported to the Office of Intellectual Freedom in 2013. A challenge is defined as a formal, written complaint filed with a library or school requesting that a book or other material be restricted or removed because of its content or appropriateness.

The 10 most challenged titles of 2013 were:banned_books_week

  • Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group, violence
  • The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence
  • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  • Fifty Shades of Grey, by E.L. James
    Reasons: Nudity, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  • The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group
  • A Bad Boy Can Be Good for A Girl, by Tanya Lee Stone
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit
  • Looking for Alaska, by John Green
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  • The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
    Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  • Bless Me Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya
    Reasons: Occult/Satanism, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  • Bone (series), by Jeff Smith
    Reasons: Political viewpoint, racism, violence

The Iowa City Public Library has Banned Books Week buttons for sale through September 27. They are available at the Help desk for $1 each. The Library also invites patrons to share photos of them reading banned books on twitter and Instagram, using the #caughtreadingatICPL hashtag.

Teens in grades seventh through 12th can celebrate Banned Books Week by participating in an online scavenger hunt about young adult books that are challenged and/or banned. Teens with the most correct answers will be entered into a drawing to win a Downtown District Gift Card. The scavenger hunt can be accessed at: http://goo.gl/0qB85W

For more information about Banned Books Week, visit www.bannedbooksweek.org.

ICPL’s Sunday Fun Day Presents: October Improv! The Story’s the Thing

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on September 18th, 2014

The Iowa City Public Library invites children interested in the performing arts to join them every Sunday in October for October Improv! The Story’s the Thing. Drama-Club-poster2

Using a variety of drama techniques to bring popular children’s stories to life, October Improv! will explore the many ways there are to tell stories, and how actors can experience the character, action, and themes inside of stories.

These weekly drama sessions will be led by AmyRuth McGraw and students from the University of Iowa’s “Drama in the Classroom” course. AmyRuth has a Master of Fine Arts in Theatre for Youth from Arizona State University. She spent four years as the Associate Director of Education for Geva Theatre Center in Rochester, New York, and was an Outreach Specialist for Sunshine, Too, a touring theatre company sponsored by the National Technical Institute for the Deaf.

Caps for Sale, designed for children in grades kindergarten through second grade, will be held from 1 to 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 5 in the Storytime Room, in conjunction with the Iowa City Book Festival. Children are invited to take on the role of monkeys and experience this well-loved story in a new way. They’ll also learn to build a story with their bodies, voices, and an empty room.

The Legend of the Shooting Star, designed for students in third through sixth grades, will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 12 in the Storytime Room. Participants will explore how storytelling devices prepare them for drama work, music inspires movement, and playing broadens the creative mind.

The Little Engine That Could, designed for children in grades kindergarten through second grade, will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 19, in the Storytime Room. Participants will use their bodies as building blocks, creating machines and exploring how to give trains personalities.

Stone Soup, for students in third through sixth grades, will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 26, in the Storytime Room. Participants will explore the difference between drama and reader’s theatre, learning how an actor communicates character and action by blending narration, vocal work, and limited movement.

October Improv! The Story’s the Thing is free to attend, but registration is required. To register, call the Library at (319) 356-5200.

Iowa City Public Library Presents Totally Tweens

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on September 15th, 2014

After a successful summer of tween-focused events during the Summer Reading Program, the Iowa City Public Library is pleased to present Totally Tweens, a once-a-month program featuring hands-on activities specifically for students in third through sixth grades. free-knitting-patterns-2

Totally Tweens begins Tuesday, Sept. 16, with Knit-In. This program will teach beginners how to knit. Already know how? Experienced knitters will be on hand to help you with your current knitting project.

Yarn will be available along with a limited number of knitting needles for those who don’t own their own. Knitting books will be available for check-out and refreshments will be provided.

Knit-In will be held from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 16, in the Storytime Room. The event is free and registration is not required.

For more information, call the Library at (319) 356-5200.

Iowa City Public Library Presents “Why are so Many Towns Named Waverly?”

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on September 12th, 2014

Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley: or ‘Tis Sixty Years Since was published anonymously in 1814, although his identity didn’t remain secret for long. The success of what some call the first historical novel in the western tradition led to Scott’s writing a series of works on similar themes, collectively called the Waverley Novels.waverley

Join Anne Stapleton, Lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Iowa, from noon to 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 19, in Meeting Room A as she presents “Sir Walter Scott’s Legacy in the Midwest: Why are so Many Towns Named Waverly?”

Come learn why Scott’s fiction captured the imagination of nineteenth-century readers across the globe, including citizens in our own Waverly, Iowa. This wee bit of background will pave the way for the Scottish literary and musical extravaganza to be held at The Englert Theatre at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 5. This event will feature readings, music, songs, and dances from and inspired by Scott’s work.

“Sir Walter Scott’s Legacy in the Midwest: Why are so Many Towns Named Waverly?” is a free event and is open to the public. It will be broadcast live on The Library Channel, Iowa City cable channel 10.

For more information, call the Iowa City Public Library at (319) 356-5200.

Iowa City Public Library Celebrates Intellectual Freedom

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on September 11th, 2014

The Iowa City Public Library will celebrate the 2014 Carol Spaziani Intellectual Freedom Festival Sept. 22 through Sept. 26.

This annual celebration is named for former librarian Carol Spaziani in honor of her 26-year career at ICPL and for her life-long commitment to the freedom of ideas. This year, the Library is collaborating with University of Iowa Obermann Center for Advanced Studies, the Reading Aloud Group from the Iowa City/Johnson County Senior Center, the University of Iowa Library and the Departments of English, Cinematic Studies, and Journalism and Mass Communications and the University of Iowa International Writing Program to present a series of programs designed that celebrate our right to think.

Monday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m.: A screening of “Diagram or Delinquents.” This documentary captures the zeitgeist of late 1940s and early 1950s America, and investigates how comics went on trial.IFF Poster 2014

Wednesday, Sept. 24 at noon: The Reading Aloud Group from the Iowa City Johnson County Senior Center will read the poetry of Edgar Allan Poe, some of whose poems were censored until well after his death.

Wednesday, Sept. 24, at 7 p.m.: Carol L. Tilley, an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will present “When Comics Almost Died – Readers, Censors, and Innovation.” Tilley’s lecture is based on her research regarding Fredric Wertham, who blamed juvenile delinquency on reading comics.

Thursday, Sept. 25 at 7 p.m.: A screening of “Dixie Chicks:  Shut Up and Sing.” This documentary follows the Dixie Chicks over a period of intense public scrutiny, fan backlash, threats, and pressure from both corporate and conservative political elements after lead singer Natalie Maines publicly criticized then President of the United States George W. Bush during a live 2003 concert in London.

Friday, Sept. 26 at 10 a.m.: An adult education class, Social Media Safety: Protecting Your Online Privacy, will be held in the Library’s second floor Computer Lab. This class focuses on the advantages and disadvantages of using privacy settings on several social networking sites.

Friday, Sept. 26, 7 p.m.: Maureen Freely, a 2014 Ida Beam Visiting Professor at the University of Iowa International Writing Program, will speak on censorship. Freely also is the president of English PEN, a global literary center that defends and promotes free expression.

Whenever possible, the Festival coincides with Banned Books Week, an annual event celebrating the freedom to read sponsored by the American Library Association, the American Booksellers Association and the American Society of Journalists and Authors, among other groups and associations.

During Banned Books Week, Sept. 21 through Sept. 27, teen patrons will be able to complete an online scavenger hunt. The scavenger hunt is designed to increase awareness of young adult literature that is challenged and banned in the U.S.

Teens with the most correct answers will be entered into a drawing to win a Downtown District Gift Card. The scavenger hunt will be accessible at teens.icpl.org beginning Sunday, Sept. 21.

For more information on the Iowa City Public Library’s Carol Spaziani Intellectual Freedom Festival, visit icpl.org/iff.

For information about Banned Books Week, visit www.bannedbooksweek.org.




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