Author Archive for Morgan Reeves



Storytime Recap: Welcome Fall

by Morgan Reeves on September 23rd, 2017
Storytime Recap: Welcome Fall Cover Image

It may not feel like it but yesterday was the first day of autumn. To welcome fall (and some hopefully cooler weather) we read a poem and a story about how summer changes into fall and danced like falling leaves. We followed a bear on a hike over a mountain and marched along. Then we read and sang about my favorite part of fall, apples! We learned how an apple tree grows apples throughout the year and then pretended to be apple trees. Finally we watched a movie based on the book by Peter Brown which follows a bear explaining why Children Make Terrible Pets. Check out the list below of books, songs and rhymes.

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Storytime Recap: Labor Day

by Morgan Reeves on September 2nd, 2017
Storytime Recap: Labor Day Cover Image

Today’s family storytime was in honor of Labor Day. We read books about all kinds of jobs and worker’s rights. We sang songs about marching and celebrating together. I told everyone about how workers came together and demonstrated for better pay and working conditions. We talked about how even children used to have hard jobs to do. I asked the children what kind of jobs they have now and what they might want to be when they grow up. We also talked about how a lot of people get Labor Day off of work or school to relax and have a good time. Read the rest of this entry »

Totally Tweens: littleBits Invention Workshop

by Morgan Reeves on August 4th, 2017

This past Tuesday the Library welcomed tween inventors to our littleBits Invention Workshop. We talked about how to use the snap-able circuits to solve problems, like how to wake up in the morning or how to keep someone out of your room.

Each group chose their own problem and brainstormed ways to solve their problem. The kids then got to experiment and try different ways of attaching the bits to create new outcomes, but mostly just for fun.

A frenzy of experiments and prototypes.

A frenzy of experiments and prototypes.

 

Finally each group had created their own invention.

Alarm-o-matic 2000 by Colin

Alarm-o-matic 2000 by Colin

Colin’s Alarm-o-matic 2000 would wake up even the heaviest sleeper with a multitude of flashing lights and loud buzzers. It comes with a convenient dimmer switch if you want to go back to sleep.

Buzzer Fan 8000 by Paul

Buzzer Fan 8000 by Paul

Paul (preferred to not be pictured) put together the Buzzer Fan 8000 in order to keep his brother out of his room. He used a sound sensor and motion sensor to turn on a buzzer and fan, which would alert him if his brother was trying to enter his room.

Volume Volt 2000 AKA Scare-o-matic 4000 by Kaden and Isran

Volume Volt 2000 AKA Scare-o-matic 4000 by Kaden and Isran

Kaden and Isran originally wanted to solve waking up in the morning. They had so much fun experimenting, that they decided to add even more startle power, and created the Volume Volt 2000 AKA Scare-o-matic 4000. With buzzers, fans, and lights triggered by motion sensors, this contraption hit all the senses with sudden stimulation sure to scare your socks off.

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Automatic Art Machine by Lydia and two others

Lydia and two other girls (who didn’t write their names down) created the fantastic Automatic Art Machine. Turn it on, hold it to the paper, and watch art appear with no more effort needed.

Automatic Art Machine by Lydia and two others

Storytime Recap: Our Community

by Morgan Reeves on July 22nd, 2017
Storytime Recap: Our Community Cover Image

Today’s family storytime was all about communities, both large and small. We read books about community helpers, towns, and families. We sang some happy songs about friends and playing together. I talked about the different community events we have in Iowa City, like the Farmer’s Market, Parties in the Park, Stories in the Park, and bookmobile stops.

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Father’s Day at the Library

by Morgan Reeves on June 18th, 2017

It’s Father’s Day and we are celebrating all of our dynamite dads at the library. We’ve put our favorite books about all kinds of fathers on display in the Children’s Room. Come in to the library to check these out and stop in for our Sunday Funday at 2pm to make a Father’s Day craft.

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Learn How to Build a Better World

by Morgan Reeves on June 9th, 2017
Learn How to Build a Better World Cover Image

In conjunction with this year’s summer reading program, “Build a Better World,” read about ways people have made the world a better place, how you can help right now, and the possibilities of the future.

Since witnessing the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, J. J. Keki has been working with his neighbors of different religions to coexist peacefully and grow coffee together. By focusing on what unites them, instead of what divides them, this village has created an example of religious tolerance and harmony for the world. Read about it in Growing Peace by Richard Sobol.

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Mother’s Day at the Library

by Morgan Reeves on May 14th, 2017
Mother’s Day at the Library Cover Image

At the library, we love books and we love our moms. So of course, we love books about moms. Here are some new titles and old favorites about all kinds of mothers. Come in to the library today to check these out and make a a special Mother’s Day treat during our Sunday Funday program at 2pm.

And I Have You  by Maggie Smith celebrates the bond between mothers and babies both animal and human.

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Storytime Recap: Things That Go

by Morgan Reeves on April 27th, 2017

As the new ICPL Bookmobile is starting to make stops around the community, we celebrated all kinds of things that go this week in storytime. Today, as usual storytime began with our welcome song “Clap Everybody and Say Hello.” I talked a little about different ways of getting from one place to another. Read the rest of this entry »

Fresh Picks: Middle Grade Medley

by Morgan Reeves on April 11th, 2017

booksThere’s something for every interest on the New Juvenile Fiction shelves. I’ve collected a few standouts for middle grade readers to showcase today. Fantasy, mystery, sci-fi, adventure, realistic fiction, and even a novel in verse. Check out one of these terrific titles today.

 

 

 

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Fresh Picks: Strong Heroines

by Morgan Reeves on March 9th, 2017
Fresh Picks: Strong Heroines Cover Image

I grew up reading stories filled with strong female characters, from L.M. Montgomery’s Anne to Roald Dahl’s Matilda to Tamora Pierce’s Alanna the Lioness. I also loved reading biographies about my real-life heroines, Susan B. AnthonyEleanor Roosevelt, and Amelia Earhart. Reading about strong female characters is important for both girls and boys, as reading has a strong influence on children’s ideas and opinions about themselves and others. In honor of Women’s History Month, here are some new books full of both fictional and factual heroines.

Fiction

The Crystal Ribbon by Celeste Lim

After being sold as a bride to a wealthy family that treats her poorly, eleven-year-old Jing, with the help of her animal spirit friends, runs away. Her subsequent journey is filled with both magic and adventure.

The Runaway by Kate O’Hearn

In the second installment of the Valkyrie series, Freya and Archie are sent back to Earth by Odin in order to locate a banished Valkyrie and bring her back to Asgard. But Brunhilde has built a life for herself on Earth and has no desire to return. And what Freya learns about that life, changes her understanding of her own family.

Disenchanted :The Trials of Cinderella by Megan Morrison

For generations the Charming men have been cursed, but now that the witch Envearia is dead the curse should be broken–however things are complicated at Charming Palace: King Clement is still nasty, Queen Maud has fled with the help of her son, Prince Dash, and Ella Coach (called Cinderella) would rather be at home sewing than living in the palace at Charming Prep school.

Nonfiction

Hidden Figures : The Untold True Story of Four African-American Women Who Helped Launch Our Nation into Space by Margot Lee Shetterly

In this young reader’s edition of the adult title, discover the stories of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden, a group of dedicated female African-American mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules, and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.

Fannie Never Flinched : One Woman’s Courage in the Struggle for American Labor Union Rights by Mary Cronk Farrell

Fanny Sellins was a union activist who fought and gave her life for equality and labor reform. This biography shines a light on the long and often dangerous fight for worker’s rights, with the period photographs providing stark reminders of the reasons for the fight.


Ten Days a Madwoman: The Daring Life and Turbulent Times of the Original “Girl” Reporter, Nellie Bly by Deborah Noyes

A biography of Nellie Bly, the pioneering journalist whose showy but substantive stunts skyrocketed her to fame. Her exploits included impersonating an inmate at an asylum for the mentally ill and reporting on the terrible conditions, as well circling the globe in 72 days and interviewing a controversial anarchist.

You’ll find these titles on the Children’s Room New Shelf for the next couple of months. While you’re there, you might find other heroines to be inspired by.