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Author Archive for Todd Brown

Rabbit hole of enlightenment

by Todd Brown on April 30th, 2015

Have you ever watched a video on Youtube, which then led you to another and another. Then you realize you have fallen down the rabbit hole. I sometimes do that with books. I will be reading a book which references a person, a subject or another book. So I will run out to the stacks to see what we have on that. This leads to having multiple partially read books, which I may or may not ever finish.

10% Happier

10% HappierIt started when I saw this author on one of the morning talk shows and ads for it kept popping up on websites. He suffered from PTSD, drug abuse and a lot of bad choices, leading to an on-air panic attack during a live news broadcast. The book is about his search for a way get his head on straight. Along the way he meets people like Eckhart Tolle, Depak Chopra, and Ted Haggart.





Full Catastrophe living

Full catastrophe livingThis is one of the authors and books mentioned in the previous title. Kabat-Zinn started the Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, to help people dealing physical and mental traumas. I made it about half way through this book before…






The Obstacle is the way

The Obstacle is the wayWhile reading, online either about Kabat-Zinn or meditation in general, I found this title on the Tim Ferris book club list. It is a collection of stories about a lot of successful historical figures and they would turn losses into wins. It leans heavily on the stoic philosophy of Seneca and Marcus Aruelius. I actually didn’t read this, I listened to it in the car. I feel like I miss things because I am not entirely focused on listening while I am driving.





Meditations and The stoic philosophy of Seneca

The Stoic philosophy of SenecaMeditationsThe previous book had a lot of quotes from these two men so I thought I would checkout more of what they actually said. Sadly, I am not sure if I opened either of these books. Maybe some day.





A guide to the good life

A Guide to the good lifeSince I wasn’t going to read the previous two I thought I would at least try to find something else which would summarize their works. The cover looks sort of depressing but it really isn’t. It starts with a brief history of Stoicism, followed by general psychological techniques such as negative visualization and meditation. It also gives advice on  specific problems like handling anger, dealing with insults, and death.





The Nerdist way

The Nerdist wayReading through all of the above books I saw a lot of things which I thought would be helpful for teens, I have two of them. But I knew mine would not have any interest in investing the time in those books. I stumbled across this one which seemed like it might be a little more appealing to them. I don’t know if I would put them in the nerdist category, but they are both gamers so I thought that aspect might draw them in. Plus the Body section has illustrations of a bear with a headband doing exercises! It is divided into three sections Mind, Body and Time. I made it through most of the Mind section before I passed the book on to my son. He seemed interested in at least looking at it.



5 books that I have not read

by Todd Brown on April 24th, 2015

At least I haven’t read them in the way that most people read books. I mostly read nonfiction, usually how to do or make something instead of just facts. I rarely read books cover to cover. I skim them and find the parts that either have the information I am looking for or a part that grabs my attention. That makes writing about books a little more difficult for me. While searching through my Reading History to find something to write about I noticed a few recurring themes.

I have always been fascinated by patterns. One small thing repeated over and over can create something big and beautiful. This has been a repeating pattern in my reading history. I would check them out, head to the craft store for supplies and see what I could make. Below are a few of many I have checked out and have not read.


The complete book of decorative knots

knotMy parents were a little confused when I asked for a book about Turk’s head knots for Christmas a few years ago. But it came with a little, adjustable tool and hundreds of knot patterns to make. The Library doesn’t own that book, but we do have several about knots. The complete book of decorative knots is one I have checked out several times. It is well illustrated and covers Turk’s heads as well as globe knots, mats and a variety of other knots which look pretty cool when done.




Chain maille jewelry workshop

chainFor a little while I was slightly obsessed with chain mail, as well as Viking knitting. The Library has several books which cover the basics of making chain mail. I think all of them have projects that they work through step by step. Most also have gallery sections to show what various artists have created with chain mail to help you find some inspiration.




Origami tessellations

tessI liked this so much that I bought my own copy. This involves a LOT of paper folding to make grids and then making patterns by folding the grid in different ways. These look great and if you put a light behind it you get a totally different pattern. Twofer! I adapted one of these patterns to make a lamp shade for a lamp I built.




Unit polyhedron origami

unitThis is another one that I bought. Also another one that I used for two lamp shades. Basically this is folding a piece of paper into a interlocking shape and then doing that over and over until you have enough of these shapes to assemble them into a variety of larger geometric shapes.




Arm and finger knitting

armBefore the Library owned this book I made a great infinity scarf for my significant other. I was kind of excited to find out we had purchased this book. Personally I didn’t care much for most of the projects in it but it does still show how to arm knit in general. Once you know that you can go out and find or make your own patterns to knit.



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Return of the Sheep Man

by Todd Brown on March 27th, 2015
Return of the Sheep Man Cover Image

I saw an online review for the latest book by Haruki Murakami called The Strange Library. It has been several years since I have finished one of his books. I have started a few but never followed through and read the whole things. I didn’t even read the review, just the title of it, but that was enough. How could I, or anyone for that matter, resist a book involving a cannibalistic librarian?

Murakami’s fiction frequently falls into the genre of Magical Realism. A lot of odd things happen in his books. Most of the time the bizarreness of the situations are not really addressed. We never find out exactly why these supernatural and surreal events are happening. If not having all of the answers bothers you then his books might be frustrating for you. I  like the lack of explanation. This is the world where the events take place and there is no need to explain it all. 

As I began reading this short story I started feeling a bit of nostalgia for the first books of his I read: Dance, Dance, Dance and A Wild Sheep Chase. I remember very little about the books but I know I enjoyed them at the time. I remember that the main character like to iron clothes, which I can relate to, and I remember there was a character called Sheep Man. I had forgotten about Sheep Man until he reappeared when I read this fairy tale last week.

Don’t worry, we can help you find information about tax collection in the Ottoman Empire and none of our staff have cannibalistic tendencies. At least not that I know of. 



Now with twice the searching power!

by Todd Brown on February 5th, 2015

Did you know that you can search for articles directly from the catalog, without retyping your search into a separate database?

From the catalog’s homepage,, make sure you are using the default “Catalog Pro” tab. Type in your search and press Enter.



The search results screen will display the first three results for materials in our collection which you can check out. Directly below them is a section labeled “Top results for articles:”. This will display the top 3 articles matching your search terms. Depending on which formats the articles are available, there will be buttons labeled “PDF” and “Full Text”.


If you are here in the Library you will be taken directly to the article. If you are not in the Library you will be asked to log in with your Library card number and the password that you created for your card, then you will be taken to the article. If you do not have a password or cannot remember what yours is, you can fix that on this page,


If those three articles are not enough, you can view more results in a couple of different ways. One way is by clicking on the link under the third article.



Another way is to click on the “Articles” tab beneath the search box and next to the “Catalog” tab.



Once you are viewing the Articles tab, there are a variety of ways that you can narrow your search. On the left side of the screen you can narrow your results to magazines, newspapers or books by choosing the appropriate database. This is also where you can also narrow your search by subject, title and place.



By using this tool you will be able to locate articles much faster and without having to leave the catalog.

Happy Searching!

Carcosa and The Yellow King

by Todd Brown on August 30th, 2014

King In Yellow

Fans of True Detective have heard of Carcosa and The Yellow King but might not know where they are originally from. I did not until Candice pointed it out to me.

Carcosa was first mentioned in the short story “An Inhabitant of Carcosa” by Ambrose Bierce in 1891. A few years later Robert W. Chambers used Carcosa, and a few other locations that Bierce mentions. It was in a collection of connected short gothic horror stories, “The King in Yellow”, published in 1895. Four of the stories are connected by references to a work of fiction also titled “The King in Yellow”. In the stories anyone who reads the this meta-book is purported to go completely insane.

The stories have a very gothic, Lovecraftian feel to them. They are tales of supernatural powers which are just out of sight and the madness that it brings. This little known book has influenced a lot of authors (as well as RPG game developers). Many authors have either mentioned Carcosa or expanded upon the Carcosa mythos. It has been used by H.P. Lovecraft and many writers of the Cthulhu  Mythos. Other writers like Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore and George R. R. Martin have locations named Carcosa in their works.

Here is a short excerpt from the book within the book, hopefully it will not drive you mad. You may recognize it from the journal of Dora Lange, one of the characters from True Detective.

“Along the shore the cloud waves break,
The twin suns sink behind the lake,
The shadows lengthen
In Carcosa.

Strange is the night where black stars rise,
And strange moons circle through the skies,
But stranger still is
Lost Carcosa.

Songs that the Hyades shall sing,
Where flap the tatters of the King,
Must die unheard in
Dim Carcosa.

Song of my soul, my voice is dead,
Die thou, unsung, as tears unshed
Shall dry and die in
Lost Carcosa.”

—”Cassilda’s Song” in The King in Yellow Act 1, Scene 2


Lesson Learned

by Todd Brown on June 2nd, 2014

Did you know that you can take college level classes from universities around the world for free?! Lifehacker University

This past Spring I read an article on Lifehacker which listed many free online classes. I was like a kid in a candy store. I signed up for multiple classes since the dates they were being offered were staggered. I signed up for  project management, Plato, programming adroid mobile devices, music production and maybe a few more.  Unfortunately, I attempted to take too many and as a result ended up not completing any of them. I learned my lesson and am now retaking the music production class and nothing else.

All of the classes I tried were free (unless you wanted a certificate of completion). They involved videos, readings, quizzes and some form of assignments. They generally ran for 4-8 weeks. There was also some form of community which allowed students to discuss the coursework and collaborate on some projects.

There are a lot of places to sign up for classes. I have used FutureLearn, Coursera, Udacity, Open2Study and Play With Your Music. At Class Central you can search for a topic at multiple online schools. It is really amazing how many classes are available out there and the range of topics that they cover. Go take a look at some of these sites and I bet you will find something that you are curious to learn more about.

While writing this post and looking at the sites again I have found several more classes that I want to take. Maybe I didn’t really learn my lesson.