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2015 Adult Summer Reading Program

by Beth Fisher on June 9th, 2015

ICPL has a great Summer Reading program every year.  But it’s not just for kids.

The Adult Summer Reading program “Everyday Heroes” runs from June 1 to August 9th, (just like the kids’ and teens’ programs.)  Simply read 5 books – or read 3 books and attend 2 of our Summer Reading Program events – before August 9th to be eligible for a free book and an entry into our Grand Prize drawings. (*see the bottom of this post for a list of prizes).

Signing up is easy:  click  HERE  to register, and then HERE to print your game card – or stop by either the Help or Information Desk next time you’re in the building and we’ll sign up up in person and grab a preprinted game card.

We have some great events scheduled for this summer.  The fun kicks off this Wednesday night, June 10th at 7:00 p.m.

ForeverGR Be An Environmental Hero  Managing Storm Water/Create a Rain Garden. Managing Storm water to protect our water resources has hit home in our communities. The goal of storm water management practices is to capture rain fall and allow it to absorb into the ground reducing runoff, pollution, and the risk of flooding. Lucy Hershberger, founder of Forever Green Garden Center, will be here to teach us what we can do in our yards to help reduce flooding, protect our drinking water and improve water quality in our rivers, streams and lakes.

Other events scheduled for this summer:

monuments menWed., June 24 7:00 p.m.  Monuments Men Movie Screening.   Starring George Clooney, Matt Damon, and Bill Murray, Directed by George Clooney, this film follows a group of every day men who joined the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program during WWII. Their mission was to find and save pieces of art and other culturally important items before their destruction or theft by the Nazis during WWII.

 george stoutWed., July 1, 7:00 p.m.  Iowa’s Own Monuments Man: George Stout.  During WWII, Winterset, Iowa native George Stout was a member of the U.S. Army’s “Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program” devoted to recovering art and other items of cultural importance that had been stolen by Nazis or hidden for safekeeping.    In 2014 these men and their mission became known world-wide with the release of the film “The Monuments Men,” directed by and starring George Clooney, who’s character Frank Stokes was based on George Stout.  Our guest speaker, Nancy Trask, Director of the Winterset Public Library, Winterset, Iowa has spent years researching George Stout and the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program.  She’ll be here to share all that she’s learned.

unsungWednesday July 8, 7:00 p.m.  Documentary Screening:  Unsung Heroes – The Story  of America’s Female Patriots.   Every woman that has ever served in the American military has volunteered to do so. These are women who, despite the hardships of military service, are proud of their long-standing commitment to the patriotic ideals of the United States. This new documentary, written and directed by Frank Martin with executive producers Ron Howard, Richard Rosetti, and Louisa Velis, is currently airing on PBS stations across the nation.  See it here first!

gable brandsMonday, July 13, 7:00 p.m.  What it Takes to Become A World Champion – with Dan Gable and Tom Brands. Spend and evening with Olympic gold metalists – and former and current Iowa hawkeye Wrestling Coaches Dan Gable and Tom Brands as they talk about what it takes to become an Olympic competitor.

open sesameWednesday July 22, 7:00 pm  Documentary Screening: Opene Sesame – The Story of Seeds.   This documentary by M. Sean Kaminsky follows the history of seeds, from their shift from a shared, local and cultureal resource, into patented, privately and coporately owned property.  Open Sesame details this history and presents some of the challenges faced today by organic and small growers, seed savers, and seed freedom advocates.

 seed savers decorahWednesday, July 29th 7:00 pm  An Evening with Seed Savers Exchange.   Staff from Seed Savers Exchange in Decorah, Iowa will be here to talk about saving seeds and theimportance of preserving heirloom seeds.  Seed Saving makes us all heroes.  This event is sponsored by ICPL and New Pioner Coop.

 

*Grand Prize Choices for the 2015 Adult Summer Reading Program:  A single one-year membership to Film Scene; one $50 Downtown Iowa City gift card; one $50 gift certificate to A&A Pagliai’s Pizza; and a pair of 2-hour Paddle Passes at the Terry Trueblood Recreation Area.

 

 

Finish Summer Reading Program with Short Audiobooks

by Bond Drager on June 29th, 2015

I find I can get a lot more reading done by using audiobooks. I may not have time to sit down and read a book every day, but I can listen to them during my commute and while doing other things. It’s the halfway point in our Summer Reading Program, so here are a few short reads (4 hours or less) to help you finish your list strong.

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (2 hours, 46 minutes) (Available on Overdrive or Fiction on Disc)
Alice is wondering what to do one day, when a talking rabbit steals her attention. She is so intrigued that she follows him into his hole, and tumbles down into Wonderland. Alice soon discovers that reality and logic, as she knows them, do not apply here. In an attempt get out of the hole and into, “the loveliest garden you ever saw”, she eats a cake to grow large enough to reach the key to the garden.

Animal Farm by George Orwell (3 hours, 11 minutes) (Available on Overdrive or Fiction on Disc)
George Orwell’s classic satire of the Russian Revolution has become an intimate part of our contemporary culture, with its treatment of democratic, fascist, and socialist ideals through an animal fable. The animals of Mr. Jones’ Manor Farm are overworked, mistreated, and desperately seeking a reprieve. In their quest to create an idyllic society where justice and equality reign, the animals of Manor Farm revolt against their human rulers, establishing the democratic Animal Farm under the credo, “All Animals Are Created Equal.” Out of their cleverness, the pigs—Napoleon, Squealer, and Snowball—emerge as leaders of the new community. In a development of insidious familiarity, the pigs begin to assume ever greater amounts of power, while other animals, especially the faithful horse Boxer, assume more of the work. The climax of the story is the brutal betrayal of Boxer, when totalitarian rule is reestablished with the bloodstained postscript to the founding slogan: “But Some Animals Are More Equal than Others.”

This astonishing allegory, one of the most scathing satires in literary history, remains as fresh and relevant as the day it was published.

Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote (2 hours, 52 min.) (Available on Fiction on Disc)
In this seductive, wistful masterpiece, Truman Capote created a woman whose name has entered the American idiom and whose style is a part of the literary landscape. Holly Golightly knows that nothing bad can ever happen to her at Tiffany’s. Her poignancy, wit, and naivete continue to charm.

The Breathing Method by Stephen King (2 hours, 50 minutes) (Available on Overdrive)
The Breathing Method, from Stephen King’s bestselling collection Different Seasons, takes place in an exclusive gentleman’s club in New York, where no one pays any dues. Membership is based upon a telling of tales, and one nightmarish tale about a disgraced woman determined to give birth—no matter the consequences—pays for them all.

The Call of the Wild by Jack London (3 hours, 20 minutes) (Available on Overdrive or Fiction on Disc)
The adventures of an unusual dog, part St. Bernard, part Scotch shepherd, that is forcibly taken to the Klondike gold fields where he eventually becomes the leader of a wolf pack.

The Death of Ivan Ilych by Leo Tolstoy (2 hrs., 45 min.) (Available on Fiction on Disc)
As an unusual illness plagues Russian public official Ivan Ilyich, his life is forever changed as he deals with doctors who cannot diagnose or treat him, as well as a certain death sentence.

Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill (3 hours, 10 minutes) (Available on Overdrive or Fiction on Disc)
Dept. of Speculation is a portrait of a marriage. It is also a beguiling rumination on the mysteries of intimacy, trust, faith, knowledge, and the condition of universal shipwreck that unites us all. Jenny Offill’s heroine, referred to in these pages as simply “the wife,” once exchanged love letters with her husband, postmarked Dept. of Speculation, their code name for all the uncertainty that inheres in life and in the strangely fluid confines of a long relationship. As they confront an array of common catastrophes–a colicky baby, bedbugs, a faltering marriage, stalled ambitions–the wife analyzes her predicament, invoking everything from Keats and Kafka to the thought experiments of the Stoics to the lessons of doomed Russian cosmonauts. She muses on the consuming, capacious experience of maternal love, and the near total destruction of the self that ensues from it, as she confronts the friction between domestic life and the seductions and demands of art. With cool precision, in language that shimmers with rage and wit and fierce longing, Jenny Offill has crafted an exquisitely suspenseful love story that has the velocity of a train hurtling through the night at top speed. Exceptionally lean and compact, Dept. of Speculation can be read in a single sitting, but there are enough bracing emotional insights in these pages to fill a much longer novel.

Hatchet by Gary Paulsen (3 hr., 42 min.) (Available on Overdrive or Fiction on Disc)
The adventures of an unusual dog, part St. Bernard, part Scotch shepherd, that is forcibly taken to the Klondike gold fields where he eventually becomes the leader of a wolf pack.

A Load of Hooey by Bob Odenkirk (2 hours, 27 minutes) (Available on Overdrive)
Bob Odenkirk is a legend in the comedy-writing world, winning Emmys and acclaim for his work on Saturday Night Live, Mr. Show with Bob and David, and many other seminal television shows. This book, his first, is a spleen-bruisingly funny omnibus that ranges from absurdist monologues (“Martin Luther King Jr.’s Worst Speech Ever”) to intentionally bad theater (“Hitler Dinner Party: A Play”), from avant-garde fiction (“Obit for the Creator of Madlibs”) to free-verse poetry that’s funnier and more powerful than the work of Calvin Trillin, Jewel, and Robert Louis Stevenson combined.

Odenkirk’s debut resembles nothing so much as a hilarious new sketch comedy show that’s exclusively available as a streaming video for your mind. As Odenkirk himself writes in “The Second Meeting of Jesus and Lazarus,” it is a book “to be read aloud to yourself in the voice of Bob Newhart.”

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway (2 hrs., 45 min.) (Available on Fiction on Disc)
The story of an old Cuban fisherman, down on his luck, and his supreme ordeal, a relentless, agonizing battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream.

A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler

by Katherine Habley on June 25th, 2015
A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler Cover Image

Consummate storyteller Anne Tyler has written her 20th novel to great reviews. This is the story of four generations of Whitshanks who lived in a house in Baltimore beginning in the 1920′s.  Recounting her romance with Red that began on a glorious “yellow-and-green afternoon” in July of 1959, the matriarch, Abby, relates all their complicated lives full of love, jealousy, and secrecy.  The author touches on her insights into assumptions about class, gender, race and age and the story is told with humor and great dialogue.  Her family is now trying to figure out how best to care for Abby and Red in their old age and some wish to sell the old homestead.  The novel switches back and forth in time as it unfolds the family’s history and this may be a bit confusing for some readers.  The conversations, the stream of consciousness, the wisdom and wit all make for a great choice for Book Group discussion.  The three-dimensional characters are memorable such as Linnie Mae, Junior’s wife; Stem, Red and Abby’s adopted son who still feels like he plays second fiddle; Denny, who can’t be counted on and comes in and out of everyone’s lives bringing his young daughter into the mix; and sharp-tongued Amanda.  A Spool of Blue Thread is a story about family–the good, the bad, and the ugly.  Tyler’s prose is as touching and truthful as ever when dealing with a family in all its complexity–something most of us can surely relate to in our own families, especially those of use in the sandwich generation. Bravo, Anne Tyler, you’ve done it again.

Video Staff Picks: Children’s and Young Adult Summer Reading Recommendations

by Bond Drager on June 25th, 2015

Don’t let your kids lose steam in their summer reading! Here are some picks from library staff for kids of all ages.

Express Scanner

by Brent Palmer on June 22nd, 2015

New Express Scanner

We have a new express scanning service at ICPL. You don’t have to have a library card, get a guest pass, log in to a computer or learn how to use software. Simply step up and get started. You can scan a document and send it to yourself (or someone else) via email, save it to a flash drive or upload it to dropbox. It is quick and painless. The flatbed scanner handles up to 11×17 sized pages and makes scanning pages from books easy. There is a also a fast document scanner if you need to scan a stack of papers for some reason. The express scanner is on the second floor. We hope you get a chance to try it out.

Video Staff Picks: Celebrity Biographies with Terri

by Bond Drager on June 18th, 2015

Terri shares some of her favorite (and not so favorite) celebrity biographies, memoirs, and retrospectives.

A Dangerous Place by Jacqueline Winspear

by Katherine Habley on June 14th, 2015
A Dangerous Place by Jacqueline Winspear Cover Image

Jaqueline Winspear’s latest Maisie Dobbs novel is an intriguing mystery sure to engage readers even if not familiar with the popular series.  The title comes from a quote by Albert Einstein, “The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don’t do anything about it.”  Set in 1937 at the precipice of World War II, the psychologist/private investigator’s life has been turned upside down with the untimely death of her husband and subsequent miscarriage four years earlier.  After a trip to India to find solace, Maisie is still grieving and just not ready to return to London and her concerned father and stepmother.  She disembarks in Gibraltar where the Spanish civil war is happening just across the border.  There she comes across the body of a man, Sebastian Babayoff, while out walking one night.  He was a photographer and Sephardic Jew, and the circumstances surrounding his murder cause Maisie to want to find out the truth about his death. Having something meaningful to sink her teeth into helps lift Maisie out of her depression and suicidal thoughts. She begins her investigation in the British garrison town full of refugees trying to piece together the bits of information she gathers from Babayoff’s family and the Jewish community.  Complications arise when she herself comes under scrutiny and she finds herself being investigated by the British Secret Service.  The period detail is descriptive and accurate about life and times on “the Rock.” This novel will be appealing to readers of historical fiction and followers of the intrepid protagonist.

 

11 TV Shows to Binge Watch on Maternity Leave

by Bond Drager on June 10th, 2015

I’ve just come back from a maternity leave, and here’s my advice for new parents everywhere: get some fun, light things to watch while you’re feeding your kid. You’ll spend a crazy amount of hours parked on the couch, not able (or unwilling) to focus on anything with much depth. The library makes a great first outing for a new family – there are changing tables and a private lactation room in the children’s area, and parking is free at the Sheraton for an hour. Here are a few shows I’d recommend grabbing the next time you’re here.

Alias – College student is super secret spy on her days off. Bradley Cooper takes his shirt off. ‘Nuff said.

Arrested Development – Dysfunctional formerly rich family loses everything when their dad goes to jail. This show lends itself to binge watching because jokes build on themselves throughout the episodes.

Broad City – If you want some very adult humor to keep you going, this is your show. It is modern and totally funny.

The Good Wife – Former attorney who’s been a stay at home mom for years has to start over when her husband, the State’s Attorney for Cook County, Illinois, gets caught up in a sex scandal and is sent to jail. Surprisingly high quality for a “murder of the week” type show.

IT Crowd – British sitcom about three lazy people who work in an IT department. If you’re a little bit nerdy, you’ll love this show.

Louie – A comedian aptly named Louie lives in New York and shares custody of his two young daughters. As the seasons have gone on, this relatively simple show from standup comedian Louis CK has matured and now each episode is almost a short film.

The Mindy Project – a lighthearted sitcom about Dr. Mindy Lahiri, a single gynecologist who lives in New York. Of course there’s a will they/won’t they plot with her handsome colleague.

Orange is the New Black – suburban girl/former drug smuggler goes to prison. Kind of a comedy, kind of a drama. It’s easy to get hooked on this show.

Parks and Recreation – The main character is a woman who accomplishes terrific things for a small town using her brain and with the help of her friends. This show is terribly funny and the kind of thing I would be okay with my daughter watching one day. Skip the first season and start with the second.

Scandal – A DC “fixer” who is also secretly the President’s former mistress. This show is plot heavy and full of overacting. Lots of twists and mysteries without being super deep. Just the thing for a sleep deprived parent.

Silicon Valley – A comedy about a brilliant programmer who comes up with an algorithm that’s going to “change everything” and how he and his friends try to build a start-up company. Again, over-the-top adult humor (This show aired on HBO), but very funny.

Summer Food Rocks! Program

by Kara Logsden on June 3rd, 2015

It’s summer and for many this means relaxed days, vacations, and no school. For others this means long days, no school breakfast or lunch, and being hungry. Fortunately our community has a Summer Food Rocks! program. From June 15th through July 30th on Mondays through Thursdays, breakfast and lunch are served at Fairmeadows Park and the Pheasant Ridge Neighborhood Center.

Summer Food Rocks! is open to all children 18 and younger. There is no enrollment and no cost. Breakfast is served 9-9:30 AM and lunch is served Noon-12:45 PM.

Here’s a link to more information: 2015 SummerMeals_flyer_2015

Feel free to print this PDF and post it where students might find it. If you know a student who could benefit from this program, please pass along the information.

For more information, contact Alison Demory, RD/LD, Director of Nutrition Services, Iowa City Community School District, 688-1021.

Three cheers for summer!

Library Links Golf Classic set for June 26

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on June 2nd, 2015

It’s almost tee time!

The Third Annual Library Links Golf Classic will be held Friday, June 26, at Finkbine Golf Course in Iowa City, beginning with lunch at 11:30 a.m., followed by shotgun at 1 p.m.

This annual fundraiser on the green is held to raise green for the Annual Fund of the Iowa City Public Library Friends Foundation. This year, the Library is focused on growing its Summer Reading Programs to keep children and teens reading and learning throughout the summer months.

Visit https://icplff.ejoinme.org/librarylinks to register or learn more about sponsorship opportunities. Registrants can sign up as a foursome or individual player.

Forms can also be downloaded at http://www.icpl.org/pdfs/Library_Links_2015.pdf and returned to Patty McCarthy, Director of Development, at the Iowa City Public Library, 123 S. Linn St. in Iowa City, or dropped in the donation box on the Library’s first floor, next to the book return.

For more information, contact Director of Development Patty McCarthy at patty-mccarthy@icpl.org or (319) 356-5249.




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