Freebies on the Bookmobile!

by Shawna Riggins on January 9th, 2018

The ICPL Bookmobile is officially back on the road! The Winter/Spring schedule runs from Jan 8 – May 24 with lots of new and continued stops for you to check out. To celebrate the New Year and new schedule, we will be giving away magnetic clips, as supplies last, when you stop on the Bookmobile. I am using a clip at my house as a way to display the new schedule on my refrigerator.Bookmobile Clip and Brochure

If you don’t have an up to date Library card, or maybe you’ve never had one, we would love to make you a Library card while on the Bookmobile and tell you all about the ways you can use your library. The free stuff on the Bookmobile doesn’t end with your new fridge clip – Browse our selection of books and movies for all ages or consider placing a hold from the Downtown collection to be picked up on the Bookmobile. Also keep in mind that all children’s materials checked out on the Bookmobile don’t have fines.

Check our schedule on our webpage to see where and when you can find the Bookmobile or call the library for information, 319-356-5200. See you soon!

ICPL History and the Archives Crawl

by Heidi Lauritzen on February 13th, 2018

Coming soon is the Iowa City Archives Crawl, and to get you in the mood we have set up a display of objects from the Iowa City Public Library’s archive.  The display is on the second floor near the Information Desk, and has lot of interesting things in it–but first, some details about the Crawl:

The Archives Crawl is on Saturday, February 24, 2018, from 11:00-3:00 and includes special activities at ICPL, the State Historical Society, the University of Iowa Museum of Natural History, and the University of Iowa Main Library.  (A bonus fifth site has just been added:  a Dada Futures exhibit at UI Memorial Union.)

The website for the Crawl invites you to “snoop in between the pages of historic diaries, read other people’s mail, hold feathers and fossils, and peer into mysteries revealed by historic artifacts like swords and locks of hair kept in remembrance.”  It is sponsored by the UI Obermann Center for Advanced Studies, and you can see a listing of events here.

Iowa City Public Library has short presentations every half hour, on topics such as genealogy, using our local history resources, and “Iowa City’s Most Famous Athlete You Never Heard Of”.  The full, fun list is here.  We have also invited the Johnson County Historical Society, the Friends of Historic Preservation, and Historic Foodies to join us and display information about their organizations.

But back to the display of ICPL history.  It was both a fascinating and frustrating task to choose items from our archive cupboards to include in the display:  frustrating because it was difficult to put things back when I realized I didn’t have room for everything, fascinating because ICPL is 120 years old and, thank goodness, we have saved a lot of interesting stuff.

The oldest object I found dates from around 1870, a book that has a book plate in it from the “Iowa City Library Association,” a proprietary library that loaned materials to Iowa City residents who purchased memberships in the Association.  It was active from 1870-1873, 25 years before the Iowa City Public Library was founded.

Another special book is ICPL’s first accession book, in which the first purchases for the Public Library were recorded.  You can see what those titles were if you take a look at the display (and, we still have copies in our collection of some of those early acquisitions).

We’ve also included the 1926 rules for borrowing materials, a cast iron property stamp embosser, the 1959 dress code for Library employees, a beer box, and a jar of dirt.  Check out the display and find out why!

We hope the displayed objects provide you with an appreciation of just how old this Iowa City institution is, and that the more recent photos will bring back memories of your past experiences at the Iowa City Public Library.  The display will be up until March 4th–and don’t forget the Iowa City Archives Crawl on February 24th.

 

Left:  Checkout desk in new 1963 Carnegie Library addition.

Right:  Checkout desk in the new library at 123 S. Linn St., 1981.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And the Award Goes to…

by Angela Pilkington on February 12th, 2018

The Newbery and Caldecott awards were announced this morning at the American Library Association’s midwinter conference in Denver. Erin Entrada Kelly won the 2018 John Newbery Medal for her novel Hello, Universe. Matthew Cordell won the 2018 Randolph Caldecott Medal for Wolf in the Snow. 

Three Newbery Honor Books were named: Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds; Piecing Me Together by Renée Watson; and Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut by Derrick Barnes, illustrated by Gordon C. James.

There were four Caldecott Honor Books: Big Cat, little cat by Elisha Cooper; Crown: An Ode to the Fresh CutA Different Pond by Bao Phi,‎ illustrated by Thi Bui; and Grand Canyon by Jason Chin.

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas won three prizes, including the William C. Morris Award, for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens, Corretta Scott King Book Award honor, the Printz Honor, and the Odyssey Award, for excellence in audiobook production. Jason Reynolds won both a Newbery Honor and a Printz Honor for his novel Long Way Down.

Coretta Scott King Book Awards recognizing African American authors and illustrators of outstanding books for children and young adults: “Piecing Me Together,” written by Renée Watson, is the King Author Award winner.

ICPL ran a mock Newbery and Caldecott awards this year. We were excited to see some of our choices make the Honors, but our winners didn’t match this year. Our winner for the mock Newbery was Pashmina and the mock Caldecott winner was Little Fox in the Forrest! Thanks to all who participated and voted for your favorites.

To see the entire list of winners go here.  And to find out more about the Youth Media Awards check here.

No Bookmobile President’s Day-Monday February 19

by Kara Logsden on February 12th, 2018

2017-10-homecoming-bookmobile-photoThere will be no Bookmobile service on Monday February 19, 2018 in honor of President’s Day. The Library will be open from 10AM-6PM.

On days when the Bookmobile is not in service, but the Library is open, Holds and ILLs may be picked up at the Library.

For full Bookmobile schedule information, navitgate to www.icpl.org/bookmobile

Happy President’s Day – we’ll see you on the Bookmobile soon.

New Privacy Page

by Brent Palmer on February 7th, 2018

Iowa City Public Library is committed to protecting its patrons’ privacy and confidentiality. We try to keep as little information about our patrons as possible and we don’t share it with others.  We routinely purge information including your checkout history unless you decide to opt-in to keep it.   The information that we do keep is directly related to providing services and delivering content.

We are also trying to be more transparent about the information that we do keep. We have had a publicly available privacy policy for a long time, but we decided to create a new Confidentiality and Privacy Page that is more user-friendly. At the top of the page, we outline some key points that all patrons should be aware of.  If you don’t read anything else, please check this section out.

Below that we also have a chart outlining all the different data that we keep, and how long we keep it.  Finally, we maintain a list of 3rd party vendors and providers that we use with links to their privacy policies.  If you have questions or concerns about these topics, please contact us.

Knope, Knope, Knope, YEP!!

by Kara Logsden on February 6th, 2018

The Iowa City Public Library is in the running for the best library in the United States, advancing to the Sweetums16 Round! KNOPE, we are not kidding! Vote for ICPL at this link and help us advance to the Group of 8. Voting runs through Friday February 9th.

The Sweetums16 Round is a B1G showdown pitting Iowa City Public Library against the public library that serves Penn State.

The Engaging Local Government Leaders (ELGL) group sponsors the Leslie B. Knope Award to highlight “organizations and individuals that motivate, inspire and attract the best and brightest to local government.”

Astute readers and fans of NBC’s “Parks and Recreation” know Leslie B. Knope, played by actress Amy Poehler, is a local government champion in the town of Pawnee, Indiana. Unfortunately, Knope dislikes libraries because of the Pawnee library director, Tammy Swanson, who is the ex-wife of her friend and co-worker. Fortunately ICPL doesn’t employ anyone named Tammy … and we have an awesome Library Director!

One of Leslie Knope’s goals is to make her town more fun. Join in the fun and vote for Iowa City Public Library for Best Library in the United States!

 

 

Experience Ex Libris with Us!

by Patty McCarthy on February 2nd, 2018

You’re invited to join other library friends at a special Iowa City screening of Ex Libris, the award-winning film about the New York Public Library. I think that fans of director Frederick Wiseman’s films and everyone else who loves what public libraries like NYPL and ICPL mean to their neighborhoods and communities will not want to miss this opportunity. We’re partnering with FilmScene and the University of Iowa Libraries to offer the film on Saturday, February 17 at 10am, and again on Sunday, February 18 at 10am. Tickets for this amazing documentary are available at FilmScene (118 E College St, Suite 101, Iowa City) or online at http://www.icfilmscene.org./

Discount tickets are available to supporters of the Iowa City Public Library Friends Foundation. Make a donation and use the Additional Information section to tell me that you’d like to know how to get the discount and I’ll happily share that information. See you there!

 

Deposit Collections from ICPL

by Heidi Kuchta on February 2nd, 2018

 

The Deposit Collections are not a well-known Outreach offering of the Iowa City Public Library, but they provide a fun “mini browsing” experience for residents of Melrose Meadows Retirement Community, Oaknoll Retirement Community, and Oaknoll’s Health Center. Retirement and assisted living facilities in Iowa City, Hills, University Heights, and Rural Johnson County are eligible to borrow 30 Large Print books from our collection every 9 weeks. Community & Access Services works with Maintenance to ensure these temporary browsing collections are delivered and switched out on time.

I love choosing which 30 books get the honor of making the trip to each facility. Since one of the library’s purposes is to provide information and entertainment that appeals to a variety of interests and tastes, I am sure include a variety of popular literary fiction, mysteries, romances, westerns, and nonfiction. I am also careful not to send the same books out over and over, aiming instead to send a new batch each time.

Responsibility for the Deposit Collections rests with the institutions that host them, since they are loaned items and not donations. If a prospective outreach site feels they do not have a controlled enough environment to keep track of loaned books, they may choose to receive gift books instead. For more information about Deposit Collections and Outreach Libraries, you can contact me at Heidi-Kuchta@icpl.org or by calling me at 319-887-6038.

Mock Caldecott Review: Here We Are

by Casey Maynard on January 26th, 2018

Image result for oliver jeffers here we areLast, and last to be published in 2017, but certainly not least in our Mock Caldecott review series is Here We Are: notes for living on planet Earth by acclaimed author-illustrator, Oliver Jeffers.

Written for his son during the first few months of his life, Here We Are is exactly what the title suggests, a guide to life on our planet. With his singular illustration style and tongue in cheek humor, Jeffers takes us through what makes Earth, Earth, and in the process what makes us, human. The overarching theme throughout is respect for our planet, ourselves and one another.

“It looks big, Earth. But there are lots of us on here so be kind. There is enough for everyone.”

Be sure to watch out for characters from other books throughout the illustrations and read the quotations he has chosen for the dedication and copyright pages. Also, don’t forget to vote in our Mock Caldecott awards by January 31st.

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Bookmobile rhymes with Snowmobile

by Stacey McKim on January 19th, 2018

And, just like a snowmobile, the Bookmobile operates all winter!

When the freezing rain started falling last week, we were already at our Mercer Park stop.  The ground was slick and I warily drove it into the empty parking lot to test how our 22,000 pound vehicle would handle on ice.  We were elated to find that it handled surprisingly well!  We made it to the 1st Avenue Hy-Vee stop and back to our downtown parking spot without any trouble.

Bookmobile at Saddlebrook

Here’s the Bookmobile at Saddlebrook

But snow or a different type of ice on the roads might be a different story, so please don’t be surprised if you see the Bookmobile driving slower than usual!  We’re putting safety first until we all figure out how to handle such a large vehicle in adverse conditions.

What else have we done to be ready for winter Bookmobiling?  We carry a shovel and a bucket of ice melt, to make sure you can comfortably walk up to the vehicle’s door.  As you enter and exit the Bookmobile, take a little extra care in case of slush on the stairs.  You’ll be nice and toasty on board, as we have a very powerful heater.  And, finally, we bought a long ice scraper that hasn’t been used yet – cross your fingers that it stays that way for a while!

Mock Caldecott Review: Over and Under the Pond

by Casey Maynard on January 19th, 2018

Image result for over and under the pond messnerThe third installment in a nonfiction picture book series, Over and Under the Pond, is a delightful exploration of freshwater ecology for young readers.

A mother and son spend the day on the water discussing the various forms of life they encounter over the pond and in “the hidden world” below the surface. The mixed media illustrations by Christopher Silas Neal, highlight the childlike sense of wonder conveyed vividly within the delicate prose and examine this brimming ecosystem from varied perspectives. The soothing color palette and gentle text work together to make this a perfect read for quiet times that imparts knowledge without becoming dry or inaccessible. Well researched back matter provides further information about each of the animals highlighted in the book as well as resources for further reading, making this title great for classroom and instructional use as well.

Be sure to take a look at the other two books in the series, Over and Under the Snow, and Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt which are equally lovely. And if you love this title don’t forget to vote in our Mock Caldecott awards before January 31st.

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