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Bus and Books

by Kara Logsden on July 30th, 2015

2017 07 BusA recent viral story on social medial tells the story about a 12-year-old boy in Salt Lake City who asked his mailman for junk mail because he wanted more to read. The mailman posted the story on social media hoping to find some books for the boy to read. This paragraph from the Huff Post article tugged at my Mom/Librarian heart:

“Today while delivering mail to his apartment complex, I saw him reading ads, and then he asked me if I had any extra mail he could read,” Lynch wrote. “He told me his wish is to have books to read. I told him the library had many, but he said they don’t have a car, and couldn’t afford the bus.”

At the Library we have worked very hard over the years to help people access the Downtown Library. Through community surveys conducted before creating each new strategic plan (every 3-5 years) we know our community has concerns about parking downtown. We’ve addressed these concerns in a number of ways. One of the most proactive responses is our Library Bus program in partnership with Iowa City Transit.

The Library offers two great programs for riding Iowa City Transit buses to and from the Library.

Ride and Read: Your Iowa City Public Library Card is your ticket to ride an Iowa City Transit Bus FREE two times each week all year long. Present your Library Card at the Help Desk, Information Desk or Children’s Desk to receive your free pass. There’s a limit of two free passes each week and a Library Card must be presented to receive a pass.

Summer Library Bus: An Iowa City Public Library card is a child’s ticket to ride an Iowa City Transit bus free each summer. The Library will provide free bus rides to children through 12th grade, and any adult caregivers who are with them, on any Iowa City Transit bus route, from the day after Iowa City Schools dismiss until the weekday before school starts (This summer = Friday August 21), on weekdays between 9:00 am and 3:00 pm. Eligible bus riders should show their Iowa City Public Library card to the bus driver to gain free access to the bus.

In June 2015 our patrons rode an Iowa City Transit bus 1,007 times as a part of this program. In FY15 we provided 5,406 rides on a bus and last summer (June – August) 2,943 rides were provided. It’s not in our Midwest nature to boast, but I have to say this is an awesome program and a testament to our community’s dedication to our youth and Library. Thank you!

 

 

On Air – The ICPL Podcast: Episode 12

by Bond Drager on July 29th, 2015

Get the podcast here or from iTunes or Stitcher

“Summer Livin/Easy Reading and Over Hyped Releases”

In which the gang goes off the rails. This month we have a special guest, Anne from Collection Services. It’s summertime and the livin is easy, and so are the things we are reading, watching, and listening. Also Anne brings a segment on “Go Set a Watchman” and other over hyped releases. Spoiler alert: Brian loves Star Wars. 01:10 What we’re reading/watching/listening to -Anne: Penderwicks Series -Jason: The Wire -Melody: As If: The Oral History of Clueless -Brian: More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera -Meredith: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. 11:34 Easy Reading/Watching/Listening -Brian: Weezer, Dune Books -Melody: The Spymaster’s Lady by Joanna Bourne, Road Warrior, The Dresden Files Series Audiobooks -Anne: Girl Walks Into a Bar by Rachel Dratch, This is the Story of a Happy Marriage by Ann Patchett, Jaws -Jason: Kurt Vonnegut novels, Hot Chip’s album Why Make Sense, Back to the Future trilogy -Meredith: The Great Outdoors 30:52 Go Set a Watchman and other over hyped releases -Brian: Star Wars prequels -Jason: Elliot Smith’s posthumous album From a Basement on the Hill -Melody: Grand Budapest Hotel -Anne: Louisa May Alcott’s A Long Fatal Love Chase -Meredith: Maeve Binchy’s Chestnut Street

Summer Relief at the Library

by Brent Palmer on July 28th, 2015

I was recently at a cookout and met a guy who grew up in Iowa City.  He has since moved on and lived in many places around the country but he was home visiting his parents.  He never had central A/C as a kid and had fond memories of spending the long hot days of summer at ICPL.  He talked about watching movies at the A/V stations in the children’s room including the first time he saw TRON.   He also remembered the exact location in the stacks where he could find all TinTin books .  Even though he no longer lives in Iowa City, he still carries his ICPL library card that he received in 1982 and whipped it out to show me.  libcard2Are the dog days of summer getting you down?  Come on down, there is always plenty to do here at the library.

Live music @ IC Farmer’s Market

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on July 21st, 2015

The Iowa City Parks and Recreation Department and the University of Iowa Community Credit Union announced the line-up for this month’s live music at the Iowa City Farmer’s Market several weeks ago, which could make this post seem outdated, but it’s not.

Tomorrow’s Market Music performers are the Awful Purdies. If you don’t get the chance tlmpo see them perform from 5 to 7 p.m., you can check out their music through the Library’s Local Music Project.

The Local Music Project is a collection of albums by eastern Iowa musicians available for free download to your computer. We also have music by David Zollo in this collection. He performed at the market on July 8.

The musical line-up for the rest of July is as follows:

  • Wednesday, July 22: Awful Purdies
  • Saturday, July 25: Ryne Doughty
  • Wednesday, July 29: Lew Knudson

Market Music is scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays and 9 to 11 a.m. on Saturdays.

Teachable moments @ the IC Farmer’s Market

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on July 15th, 2015

Now that my kids are teenagers (insert clichéd “Where did the time go?” mental photo montage here), I don’t experience as many teachable moments as I did when they were little. Don’t get me wrong, we still have teachable moments, but now they are more “OK, time to practice parallel parking” and “No one knows how to fold fitted sheets; you’re fine” instead of “What color is the apple?”

Visiting the Iowa City Farmer’s Market is a great activity for families because the place is filled with teachable moments. Preschoolers can show off their color knowledge, older students can practice their math skills, and babies can take in the scenery and, hopefully, be so exhausted by the time they get home, they take a long nap.

But what about teens? What teachable moments can they have at the farmer’s market?Farm to table pic1

A lot, actually.

My daughter accompanied me to the market last fall as part of her social studies’ world hunger unit. She had a BINGO card of activities she needed to complete and one was to go to a local farmer’s market and interview a vendor. She had to ask about what they sold, how they grew and/or made it, how far they traveled to get to the market, etc.

It was fun to watch her approach a vendor, explain the purpose of her assignment and go through her list of questions. Not only did she learn something new, she was able to practice her interview and note-taking skills, and patience, as their conversation was interrupted several times so the vendor could help a customer.

I’m teaching my children how to cook this summer. Correction. I’m teaching them how to cook something besides toast and hot dogs. They recently visited the Library’s cookbook collection (check out our Farm to Table cookbook display on the second floor), found recipes they want to try, and then went to the farmer’s market to buy their ingredients.

I took photos. I was told not to put them on Facebook. When I said it was for work, I got the look. If you have (or had) teens, you know what look I’m talking about.

Here’s a teachable moment for parents: pick your battles.

Community IDs and Library Cards

by Kara Logsden on July 11th, 2015

Community IDThe Johnson County Auditor’s Office will begin accepting applications for Community ID cards Friday July 17 at 1:00 PM.

UPDATE 7/14/15: Here’s a link to the online application for the new Community ID Cards.

We are excited about the program and hope this will encourage members of our community to use their Community ID card to get at Library Card.

It’s easy to get a Library Card and only takes a couple minutes. The online application is available at http://www.icpl.org/cards/get-a-card/ It works great to sign-up online at home or you can complete an online application at the Library at any of the catalog terminals.

Once you’ve registered online, stop by the Help Desk to pick up your Library Card.

Adults and students in 7th grade and older should be prepared to show photo identification and proof of your residence address. A Community ID card or Driver’s License fulfils the requirement for both if the current address is listed. Other documents that work for proof of address include a lease, voter registration card, mail with a current post mark or pre-printed checks from a bank.

Students in 6th grade or younger should be accompanied by a parent or guardian who will be asked to show a photo ID and proof of current address.

Three Cheers for the new Community ID program and everyone who made this possible! We look forward to seeing these ID cards at the Library.

Return to Augie Hobble

by Casey Maynard on July 9th, 2015

One of my favorite books I remember getting from a grandparent when I was just learning to read was TAugie Hobblehe Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales by Jon Scieszka, illustrated by Lane Smith. I still have it and it’s still one of my favorites.  Having been a life long fan of Lane Smith it’s no shocker that I still adore his picture books and am glad to see that he’s received plenty of recognition for his fantastic body of work, as author/illustrator and illustrator.

I was especially excited for his new and first novel, Return to Augie Hobble. I devoured this book, reading it in a total of three sittings over the course of twelve hours. The seamless blending of myth, fairy tale and reality through poignant text and interactive images brought me right back to my first readings of Stinky Cheese Man. 

It’s summer, school is out. AAugie Hobble nd yet Augie Hobble has to work on a project for his Creative Arts class, a project that he failed the first time around. Balancing work at his father’s fairy tale themed amusement park, spending time with his best friend, Britt, and trying to finish his make-up project is no easy task. Throw in mysterious pet disappearances, clairvoyance, lycanthropy, messages from the beyond as well as government agents poking about and you’ve got one hot season.

Augie Hobble is a triumphant debut and will definitely leave parents and children alike eager for more from Lane Smith.Augie Hobble

 

Arts and Crafts @ the IC Farmer’s Market

by Kara Logsden on July 7th, 2015

Bird Houses from the Iowa City Farmer’s Market

One of my favorite parts of the Iowa City Farmer’s Market is not the produce or the yummy food, but the arts and crafts available at the Market. I have some awesome garden art purchased at the Market as well as sweet-scented soap and bird feeders.

One of my favorite Market purchases was bird houses. We had a beautiful weeping cherry tree in our front yard. We think it may have been struck by lightning because there was suddenly a big, gaping split down one side of the tree. Then the tree started look a bit sickly, the leaves shriveled up and the tree died. We trimmed the beautiful bent branches back to near the tree trunk and then had an inspiration. What if we turned our beloved tree into a bird colony?

We had a pin oak tree in the back yard that died about five years ago. As we were cutting off the branches we realized the post that was left would be great for a bird house. We purchased an awesome bird house at the Iowa City Farmer’s Market to put at the top of the trimmed-up trunk. The birds love it and we enjoy watching the birds come and go.

But … I digress. Back to the weeping cherry tree. The trimmed tree looked a bit like it was from a Dr. Seuss book and maybe some Who’s from Whooville may want to move it. Once we added birdhouses from the Farmer’s Market, though, it became a bit of an art installation in our yard.

First Bird House

First Bird House

The good news is the birds also love it. This year we have many bird families living in these new houses. We thoroughly enjoy the birds singing in the morning and are happy our weeping cherry tree was re-purposed without leaving an empty spot in our yard.

If you have questions about yard art, bird houses, or feeding wild birds, remember the Library has great books on these topics and many more!

See you at the Market!

 

Alice’s Influence over 150 Years

by Stacey McKim on July 2nd, 2015

It’s the 150th anniversary of the publication of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” and we’re marking the occasion with a display of books and movies influenced by the book. You’ll find titles like “Alice in Zombieland” and “Alice in Quantumland” as well as graphic novels featuring characters from Wonderland, movies with allusions to Alice, music CDs, and non-fiction books about the real Alice Liddell.

aliceNot all of the nonsense in the story is baseless, as I learned after I bought a 1966 copy of “The Annotated Alice” in a used bookstore in Hay-on-Wye (a small town in Wales famous for its dozens of bookshops, claiming the highest ratio of books per person on earth).

For years, I’ve enjoyed pretending that the “For copyright reasons, this edition is not for sale in the U.S.A.” note on the back cover meant that I was the only American with access to the excellent footnotes explaining all the math jokes, cultural allusions, and more. Well, of course not. Preparing for this display, I learned that a new edition was widely published in the year 2000 as “The Annotated Alice: the definitive edition,” and I invite you to out-footnote me with one of ICPL’s two copies. More speculations about the “Why is a raven like a writing-desk?” riddle have accrued in between editions — for example, “Because a writing-desk is a rest for pens and a raven is a pest for wrens” — even though I know from the same footnote that Carroll intended it as a riddle with “no answer at all.”

Revisit an old favorite in a new form or have a crack at reading the book for the first time during this special anniversary year.

Finish Summer Reading Program with Short Audiobooks

by Bond Drager on June 29th, 2015

I find I can get a lot more reading done by using audiobooks. I may not have time to sit down and read a book every day, but I can listen to them during my commute and while doing other things. It’s the halfway point in our Summer Reading Program, so here are a few short reads (4 hours or less) to help you finish your list strong.

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (2 hours, 46 minutes) (Available on Overdrive or Fiction on Disc)
Alice is wondering what to do one day, when a talking rabbit steals her attention. She is so intrigued that she follows him into his hole, and tumbles down into Wonderland. Alice soon discovers that reality and logic, as she knows them, do not apply here. In an attempt get out of the hole and into, “the loveliest garden you ever saw”, she eats a cake to grow large enough to reach the key to the garden.

Animal Farm by George Orwell (3 hours, 11 minutes) (Available on Overdrive or Fiction on Disc)
George Orwell’s classic satire of the Russian Revolution has become an intimate part of our contemporary culture, with its treatment of democratic, fascist, and socialist ideals through an animal fable. The animals of Mr. Jones’ Manor Farm are overworked, mistreated, and desperately seeking a reprieve. In their quest to create an idyllic society where justice and equality reign, the animals of Manor Farm revolt against their human rulers, establishing the democratic Animal Farm under the credo, “All Animals Are Created Equal.” Out of their cleverness, the pigs—Napoleon, Squealer, and Snowball—emerge as leaders of the new community. In a development of insidious familiarity, the pigs begin to assume ever greater amounts of power, while other animals, especially the faithful horse Boxer, assume more of the work. The climax of the story is the brutal betrayal of Boxer, when totalitarian rule is reestablished with the bloodstained postscript to the founding slogan: “But Some Animals Are More Equal than Others.”

This astonishing allegory, one of the most scathing satires in literary history, remains as fresh and relevant as the day it was published.

Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote (2 hours, 52 min.) (Available on Fiction on Disc)
In this seductive, wistful masterpiece, Truman Capote created a woman whose name has entered the American idiom and whose style is a part of the literary landscape. Holly Golightly knows that nothing bad can ever happen to her at Tiffany’s. Her poignancy, wit, and naivete continue to charm.

The Breathing Method by Stephen King (2 hours, 50 minutes) (Available on Overdrive)
The Breathing Method, from Stephen King’s bestselling collection Different Seasons, takes place in an exclusive gentleman’s club in New York, where no one pays any dues. Membership is based upon a telling of tales, and one nightmarish tale about a disgraced woman determined to give birth—no matter the consequences—pays for them all.

The Call of the Wild by Jack London (3 hours, 20 minutes) (Available on Overdrive or Fiction on Disc)
The adventures of an unusual dog, part St. Bernard, part Scotch shepherd, that is forcibly taken to the Klondike gold fields where he eventually becomes the leader of a wolf pack.

The Death of Ivan Ilych by Leo Tolstoy (2 hrs., 45 min.) (Available on Fiction on Disc)
As an unusual illness plagues Russian public official Ivan Ilyich, his life is forever changed as he deals with doctors who cannot diagnose or treat him, as well as a certain death sentence.

Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill (3 hours, 10 minutes) (Available on Overdrive or Fiction on Disc)
Dept. of Speculation is a portrait of a marriage. It is also a beguiling rumination on the mysteries of intimacy, trust, faith, knowledge, and the condition of universal shipwreck that unites us all. Jenny Offill’s heroine, referred to in these pages as simply “the wife,” once exchanged love letters with her husband, postmarked Dept. of Speculation, their code name for all the uncertainty that inheres in life and in the strangely fluid confines of a long relationship. As they confront an array of common catastrophes–a colicky baby, bedbugs, a faltering marriage, stalled ambitions–the wife analyzes her predicament, invoking everything from Keats and Kafka to the thought experiments of the Stoics to the lessons of doomed Russian cosmonauts. She muses on the consuming, capacious experience of maternal love, and the near total destruction of the self that ensues from it, as she confronts the friction between domestic life and the seductions and demands of art. With cool precision, in language that shimmers with rage and wit and fierce longing, Jenny Offill has crafted an exquisitely suspenseful love story that has the velocity of a train hurtling through the night at top speed. Exceptionally lean and compact, Dept. of Speculation can be read in a single sitting, but there are enough bracing emotional insights in these pages to fill a much longer novel.

Hatchet by Gary Paulsen (3 hr., 42 min.) (Available on Overdrive or Fiction on Disc)
The adventures of an unusual dog, part St. Bernard, part Scotch shepherd, that is forcibly taken to the Klondike gold fields where he eventually becomes the leader of a wolf pack.

A Load of Hooey by Bob Odenkirk (2 hours, 27 minutes) (Available on Overdrive)
Bob Odenkirk is a legend in the comedy-writing world, winning Emmys and acclaim for his work on Saturday Night Live, Mr. Show with Bob and David, and many other seminal television shows. This book, his first, is a spleen-bruisingly funny omnibus that ranges from absurdist monologues (“Martin Luther King Jr.’s Worst Speech Ever”) to intentionally bad theater (“Hitler Dinner Party: A Play”), from avant-garde fiction (“Obit for the Creator of Madlibs”) to free-verse poetry that’s funnier and more powerful than the work of Calvin Trillin, Jewel, and Robert Louis Stevenson combined.

Odenkirk’s debut resembles nothing so much as a hilarious new sketch comedy show that’s exclusively available as a streaming video for your mind. As Odenkirk himself writes in “The Second Meeting of Jesus and Lazarus,” it is a book “to be read aloud to yourself in the voice of Bob Newhart.”

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway (2 hrs., 45 min.) (Available on Fiction on Disc)
The story of an old Cuban fisherman, down on his luck, and his supreme ordeal, a relentless, agonizing battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream.




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