Bookmobile Service Returns Monday January 8, 2018

by Kara Logsden on January 4th, 2018

The Bookmobile has enjoyed its time at the Bookmobile Spa (a nice, heated garage) but it’s ready to return to service on Monday January 8. The Winter/Spring 2018 Schedule has a number of new stops as well as a few time changes for existing stops. Some stops stay the same. A full Winter/Spring schedule is available online at www.icpl.org/bookmobile.

During the Bookmobile’s break, we have been collecting Holds at the Library. They will be loaded on the Bookmobile on Monday morning and ready for pick-up at any Bookmobile stop. We hold items for 7 days, so please make sure you pick-up your hold this week.

If the weather is bad and you think there’s a possibility Bookmobile services may have been canceled, please call the Library or check our webpage before heading out. Information about Bookmobile services when there is severe or winter weather can be found at this blog post.

If you have questions about the new Bookmobile schedule, give us a call at 319-356-5200 during regular Library hours or navigate to www.icpl.org/bookmobile.

We’ll see you in the community soon!

Let’s Make Music!

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on January 4th, 2018

If you’ve ever attended Storytime at the Library, you know music is just as important to the program as the stories themselves.

“Music before the program sets the stage and warms up everyone into thinking fun,” Karen said. “At Book Babies, we sing lots of songs and we repeat the songs because research shows that children learn through repetition. Repeating the songs helps babies and toddlers learn words.”

The Children’s Room staff attended Kids First last spring and learned even more about the importance of music education from singer-educator Carole Stephens. One of the facts she shared is that 90 percent of the brain is used when a child actively participates in music.

A parent recently contacted the Library to ask if we have playlists for our Storytime music. The answer is yes and no.

“For the most part, we import CDs from our collection onto our iTunes database and customize our playlists for each storytime,” Mari said. “Every librarian has their favorites that tend to get played more often, though.”

Most Storytimes often start with “Clap Your Hands” by Lisa DeRosia, “Clap Everybody and Say Hello” by Kathy Reid-Naiman, “I’m in the Mood” by Raffi, or “Oh Hi Hello” by Jim Gill. Other songs/artists you’ll often hear include: “The More We Get Together;” Laurie Berkner; Carole Peterson; Raffi; and Old Town School of Folk Music (Songs for Wiggleworms).

So yes, we have playlists for Storytimes, but no, they aren’t something that can be checked out by patrons.

There is a bright side, though.

“We use a lot of music that is in our Children’s CD collection,” Karen said. “I have had many parents ask for the name of the artist or album after Storytime.”

So if there’s a song you and your child enjoy at Storytime, or you want to expand the repertoire of songs you sing at home, ask the Children’s Room staff for their recommendations. Your question might even launch an impromptu singalong.

Hey, those songs are catchy!

ICPL Staff Top Picks for 2017: Best of the Best

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 31st, 2017

It’s here: the Iowa City Public Library’s Top Picks for 2017!

Staff members nominated nearly 100 books released in 2017 as their favorite reads of the year. Those that made this list were nominated by more than one person, which truly makes them the Best of the Best.

  • Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman
  • The Most Dangerous Place on Earth by Lindsey Lee Johnson
  • The Women in the Castle by Jessica Shattuck
  • Golden Hill by Francis Spufford (published in Britain in 2016; released in the U.S. in May of 2017)
  • Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu
  • La Belle Sauvage by Philip Pullman
  • The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
  • Maya Lin: Artist-Architect of Light and Lines by Jeanne Walker Harvey
  • Here We Are: Notes For Living On Planet Earth by Oliver Jeffers
  • Full of Fall by April Pulley Sayre
  • Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk
  • Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz
  • Glass Houses by Louise Penny
  • Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman
  • What Happened by Hillary Rodham Clinton
  • Hunger by Roxane Gay
  • Vacationland: True Stories from Painful Beaches by John Hodgman
  • Janesville: An American Story by Amy Goldstein
  • Pashmina by Nidhi Chanani
  • My Favorite Thing Is Monsters, Volume 1 by Emil Ferris
  • Real Friends by Shannon Hale

Our Best Book Overall for 2017 is The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas.

This debut novel was nominated by more staff members than any other book this year, which makes sense given all the other Best of 2017 lists it has appeared on this month. If you haven’t read it, be sire to check out a copy before the movie is released!

Make those resolutions stick

by Brent Palmer on December 27th, 2017

Every year at this time, media stories begin to surface about the top New Year’s Resolutions based on some survey. But as we all know, making the resolution is easy. Figuring out how to make it sustainable is the tricky part. Maybe ICPL can help.

Bon Appetit Dec 2017

one of many magazine titles available online


Read the rest of this entry »

Holiday recycling

by Jason Paulios on December 19th, 2017

Jane Wilch, the Iowa City Recycling Coordinator, put out a great list of ideas today for reducing landfill waste over the holiday season. Some of these ideas can easily be adapted for ICPL-goers as well!

  • Be creative with gift wrapping

We have a wide variety of things on our Free Shelf area on the 2nd floor that can be reused as wrapping materials. Head to the east side of the building and look for the last row of the Comics area for some unique upcycled wrapping paper ideas like: old maps, advertisements, magazines, damaged books, etc…  If you’re looking for inspiration for making a unique card to go with a gift certificate, try some of the handicraft greeting cards and paper work craft books found here on the 2nd floor.

  • Use reusable bags when shopping

ICPL has two different branded reusable bags for purchase at the Help Desk on the 1st floor, these would work great as gift bags (especially if you filled them with books).

  • Shop secondhand

The Book End always has interesting lightly used books, DVDs, and CDs available for purchase. This is a frugal way to shop for your friends and relatives!

‘Twas the week before Christmas

by Tom Jordan on December 19th, 2017

‘Twas the week before Christmas and all through the bus,

New books were arranged on the shelves with much fuss;

Shawna had placed them, oh with great care,

In hopes they’d be borrowed, for they’re to share;

Children’s books in the back, by young eyes ‘twould be read,

Left open when falling asleep while abed; Read the rest of this entry »

Bookmobile Winter/Spring Schedule Preview

by Kara Logsden on December 18th, 2017

Library staff are finalizing the Bookmobile Winter/Spring schedule which begins on Monday January 8, 2018 and runs through May 24. There are a number of changes to the schedule, so Bookmobile users will want to pick-up a copy of the Winter/Spring schedule flyer. As a reminder, the Bookmobile will not operate from December 25 through January 4, giving staff time to do a deep clean, send the Bookmobile to the spa (maintenance garage), complete training, and update collections.

We are adding a few new stops. The Bookmobile will travel to Iowa City Rehabilitation, Regency Heights and Lemme Elementary on Mondays. Tuesdays we’re adding a Noon stop at the UI College of Medicine’s MERF/PBDB/BSB Courtyard. This is where the mobile food trucks park in the summer on Thursdays, so UI staff should be familiar with where this stop is located. We anticipate delivering many holds to this stop on Tuesdays. On Thursdays the Bookmobile will be at Hy-Vee on First Avenue.

The Grant Wood Elementary stop changes days and moves to just after school on Tuesdays and the UI Community Credit Union stop moves from Thursday to Wednesday.

The Winter/Spring schedule includes two stops where the Bookmobile will meet-up with the Crisis Center’s Mobile Food Pantry. The Bookmobile will be at Regency Mobile Home Community on Thursdays from 5:00-5:30 pm. The Mobile Food Pantry serves Regency the third Thursday of each month from 4:30-5:30 pm. On the 3rd Wednesday of each month, the Bookmobile will make a special trip out to Parkview Mobile Home Court to meet up with the Mobile Food Pantry. The Bookmobile is scheduled to be there from Noon-12:30 pm. Read the rest of this entry »

Reading the Night Away With the Jólabókaflóð

by Amanda on December 15th, 2017

What the heck is Jólabókaflóð? Literally, it means “Christmas Book Flood,” and it’s pronounced “Yo-la-bok-a-flot.” Maybe you’ve heard of it, since all things Nordic are very trendy right now (hygge, Nordic noir, Scandinavian minimalism, et cetera). It’s the Icelandic tradition of exchanging books on Christmas Eve, then spending the night reading those books. In Iceland, the holiday season kicks off in November with the delivery of the Bókatíðindi—the annual Book Bulletin, distributed by the Icelandic Publishers Association for free to each Icelandic home.

This tradition began during World War II after Iceland gained its independence from Denmark. Paper was one of the few commodities not rationed during the war, so books became the gift of choice, as other types of gifts were scarce. Iceland loves its books: 93% of Icelanders read at least one book a year (compared to 73% of Americans), and it is the third most literate country in the world (Finland and Norway are the first and second). In Iceland, one in ten people will publish a book in their lifetime, and in 2011 Reykjavík was designated a UNESCO City of Literature, three years after Iowa City received the same distinction.

Jólabókaflóð is easy to adapt to your family’s needs. While the original tradition is tied to Christmas, yours doesn’t need to be! Simply gather your family together, and enjoy each other’s company while exchanging your favorite books. Check out used bookstores, thrift stores, and library sales to get the best deals on your Book Flood gifts, or use library books for a totally free exchange (just be careful about overdue books). This article has some really fun ideas for creating your own Book Flood tradition.

This sweet tradition is very close to my heart. I grew up in a family of readers—which is probably not surprising, now that I’m working in a library and getting my Master’s in Library Science. For a lot of other families, Christmas day is a loud, boisterous occasion. For my family, it was all about the books. On Christmas Eve, we would gather around the tree and read classic picture books together; the next day was usually spent in pajamas, scattered around the house, reading all the new books we’d received as gifts. To me, there’s almost nothing better than being with people you love, reading.

What books will you give to your loved ones this holiday season?

I need to return my books, but the Library is closed. What do I do?

by Kara Logsden on December 15th, 2017

The holidays are here and that means some changes in Library hours. There is a complete list of Holiday Hours posted on the Library’s webpage.

If the Library is closed, most materials can be returned to our outside book return, on Linn Street, and the two remote book returns, located at First Avenue Hy-Vee and the Mormon Trek University of Iowa Community Credit Union. The remote book returns are emptied about 1:00 PM each day, 365 days a year.

15% of items returned to the Library come back through the two remote book returns. How do we know? Four times a year we count all items returned in a one-week period. Between November 27 and December 3, there were 17,308 items returned to the Library. Of those, 2,610 were items returned in the remote book returns.

Please give us a call if you have questions about Library hours or materials return. We’d be happy to answer your questions or help you renew items that can be renewed. You may also renew items at the “My Account” link on the Library’s webpage or by using the AWESOME Library App.

UPDATE: My Holiday Lights Won’t Work – Now What?

by Kara Logsden on December 15th, 2017

Today I received an update from Jane Wilch, the City of Iowa City’s Recycling Coordinator. There are recycling bins for holiday lights at the following locations. Unless noted, these bins are seasonal.

  • Hy-Vee (1720 Waterfront Dr, Iowa City)
  • Hy-Vee (812 S. 1st Ave, Iowa City)
  • Hy-Vee (1125 North Dodge Street)
  • Hy-Vee (1914 8th Street, Coralville)
  • Stuff Etc. (2818 Commerce Dr, Coralville)
  • Coralville City Hall (1512 7th St, Coralville)
  • Coralville Recreation Center (1506 8th St, Coralville)
  • Iowa City Landfill and Recycling Center (3900 Hebl Ave, Iowa City) (year-round)
  • ReStore donation area (2401 Scott Blvd. SE, Iowa City) (year-round)

Previous post:

‘Tis the season … for frustration with holiday lights. Every year it seems there’s a strand or two that won’t light up. I try checking bulbs, I try changing fuses, nothing works. I don’t what to throw them in the trash. What do I do?

Fortunately, Iowa City Recycles! The East Side Recycling Center at 2401 Scott Boulevard SE accepts holiday lights at the ReStore’s donation area. Lights can also be dropped off at the Iowa City Landfill and Recycling Center at 3900 Hebl Avenue SW. Their hours are 7AM to 4:30PM Monday through Saturday. Lights should be put in the electronic waste bins.

For a comprehensive list of what can be recycled in Iowa City, visit the City of Iowa City’s Recycling webpage. While you are there, check out the information about the new curbside recycling program that begins on Monday December 4th. Recycling becomes much easier because there’s no need to sort recycling materials – just throw everything in the bin together. There’s also a handy Curbside Recycling Guide.