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Holds @ ICPL

by Kara Logsden on March 2nd, 2016

2015 12 don't forgetWhat did Iowa City Public Library patrons do 146,917 times in Fiscal Year 2015? They placed a HOLD on a Library material. You may place a hold by logging into your account online or Library staff are happy to help you place a hold.

Holds, also known as “Reserves” are a convenient way to access Library materials. At the Library there are two different kinds of holds: Holds on materials checked out to other patrons and Holds on materials checked in and available (we’ll pull the items from the shelf for you!). You may have 10 free holds on your Library Account at any given time and, as a convenience, items stay on the Holds Shelf for 6 days to give you time to come in and pick them up.
Unfortunately, some holds are not picked up. We understand … sometimes plans change, sometimes you forget, or sometimes you are out of town. We have a new service to help you better manage your holds: FREEZE a HOLD.

2016 01 Freeze a HoldFREEZE a HOLD – what does that mean? If you requested an item, but want to delay when it is ready to be picked up, you can log in to your account and freeze the hold on that item. For example, if you are going on vacation and don’t want to miss getting your requested items, you can freeze the holds before you leave and then unfreeze them when you return. You will do this by logging into your account and indicating which holds you wish to freeze or unfreeze. There are some times when a hold may not be frozen – if you received a notice the hold was available for pick-up it is too late to freeze it at that point.

If you have questions about this new service, please stop by or give us a call.

B.Y.O.Book: Spring dates set, books picked–we just need you!

by Candice Smith on February 26th, 2016
B.Y.O.Book: Spring dates set, books picked–we just need you! Cover Image

B.Y.O.Book, the Library’s books-in-bars group, is ready to welcome the spring–it’s time for a few good books, some good food and drink, and a lot of great conversation! In recognition of the 100th anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize awards, we’ve picked three past winners. We hope you can join us to read and discuss one, or all, of them.

March 22, 6-7 p.m., is our first meet-up; join us at Share Wine Lounge & Small Plate Bistro, in the Sheraton to discuss The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, by Junot Díaz. Winner of the Pulitzer for Fiction in 2008, the book follows Oscar — a Dominican American, an overweight, geeky teenage nerd–as he tries to navigate his everyday life, fulfill his dream of becoming a writer and, more important, finding love — all in the face of a family curse that has haunted the Wao’s for generations.. I think Michiko Kakutani said it best, in a review for The New York Times: “…a wondrous, not-so-brief first novel that is so original it can only be described as Mario Vargas Llosa meets “Star Trek” meets David Foster Wallace meets Kanye West.” Readers, how can you resist?

You can register for the event, and check our catalog for a copy of the book–we’ve got print copies as well as CD, ebook and eaudio. We will also have a bookclub kit at the Info Desk soon, so give us a call to see if there are any available copies.

Future dates and titles are April 26 (Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner, at Northside Bistro) and May 24 (The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo by Tom Reiss, at the Mill). We hope to see you there!

 

 

Music on Friday School of Music Program

by Kara Logsden on February 24th, 2016

2016 02 ui school of music logoUniversity of Iowa School of Music students will present a wonderful noon-time program on Friday, February 26, 2016 in Meeting Room A. Please join us for an hour of enjoyment.

This program is free and open to the public. For a complete list of Music is the Word programs, visit www.icpl.org/mitw

Friday’s program will include:

Horn Trio in E flat Major Op.40                                  Johannes Brahms (1833 – 1897)

  1. Andante
    II. Scherzo (Allegro)
    III. Adagio mesto
    IV. Allegro con brio

Performed by: Three Oakes (Ethan Brozka, horn, Jenna Ferdon, violin, Max Tsai, piano)

Sonata No.23 Op. 57 F minor “Appassionata”      Ludwig van Beethoven  (1770 – 1827)

  1. Allegro Assai

 

Etude Op. 25 No. 10                                                            Frédéric Chopin (1810 – 1849)

Maple Leaf Rag                                                                     Scott Joplin (1868 – 1917)

Performed by: Hana Song, piano

Music on Wednesday: Anthony Arnone

by Kara Logsden on February 19th, 2016

2016 01 Anthony ArnoneA few years back I received an interesting telephone call. An Associate Professor at the University of Iowa, Anthony Arnone, wanted to play his cello in our Lobby. Arnone explained he was getting his car serviced and, instead of the waiting room magazines or donuts, why not play the cello during his wait? He had such a positive response, he started a project called “Bach to Work-Random Acts of Music,” playing his cello in unexpected locations.

We scheduled Mr. Arnone to play at 10:15 on a Monday morning, just as families were heading in for Storytime. The experience of hearing music was mesmerizing. People entering the Library stopped to listen and many children were curious about his playing.

Fast forward a couple years, and we are delighted to welcome Anthony Arnone back to the Library as a part of our Music on Wednesday series. Mr. Arnone will play his cello at Noon on Wednesday February 24th. If it is warm outside, he will play in the Lobby. If it is cold out, we’ll move the program to the Gallery on the first floor of the Library.

Cheers to “random acts of music” at the Library!

Tune It Up!

by Brent Palmer on February 8th, 2016
tuneitupshots

Moles popping up in the garden theme

As part of ICPL’s year-long Music is the Word program, we have commissioned a new game for Mabel the Table in the Children’s room, called “Tune It Up!”.  It was developed by Virtually Competent, a local independent gaming company. This group created one of the original games for the table called Ship Shape. Virtually Competent teamed up with a local musician to build a musically-themed game for the table.

tuneitupshots5

Notes as ships in the Space Theme

In this game, multiple players can contribute to a looping composition. The game features 3 different themes that cater to different tastes: Garden, Space and Cookies. For example, in the garden theme, players plant various seeds that turn into musical flowers in the garden. Each type of flower represents a different instrument. It is a cooperative game.

tuneitupshots4

Touching the bee speeds up the tempo

Anyone can step up and help with the composition and here are no winners or losers. Tune It Up! also features a mini-game within each theme.   For example the garden has an infestation of moles that can be whacked and the space theme has asteroids that have to be destroyed. Also each theme has a character that can speed the tempo up or slow it down.  The Children’s staff can save compositions created by kids and used as demos.

Come try it out on Mabel the Table in the Children’s Room.

Music on Wednesday: Music from the Heart

by Kara Logsden on February 5th, 2016

2016 02 Preucil LogoFebruary is Love Your Library month and there’s a lot to love at Iowa City Public Library! From the 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten kickoff to Black History Month programs & displays, and continuing Music is the Word programs, there’s a lot of love for reading, connecting, and life long learning.

And now there’s more to love because we heard from Preucil School of Music today and they are preparing a wonderful “Music from the Heart” program for our Music on Wednesday series next week. Stop by Meeting Room A at Noon on Wednesday February 10th to hear an hour of Music from the Heart. Preucil faculty and students will be playing their favorite violin, viola, cello and piano pieces. Faculty performers will be Laura Shaw, cello and William Preucil, Sr., viola.

While you are here, stop by the 1st Floor Gallery and make a Valentine for the Library or browse the Blind Date with a Book or Blind Date with an Album display. Who knows, you may find a new love!

Or send us a note and let us know why you Love Your Library.

PS – Why do I love My Library? Because it’s an awesome place to work, t2014 02 Love your Libraryhere’s always something new going on, I see many friendly people each day, and I get to check out and enjoy great books.

What’s up with the wrapped books and CDs?

by Stacey McKim on February 2nd, 2016

You know how you’re always judging books by their covers? Of course, we all do. For the month of February, though, we want you to see past those stereotypical cover images and go home with a book where the author’s name is way bigger than the title (or vice versa).

BlindDateAlbumLibrary staff members have selected our favorites and, based only on our descriptions, we hope you’ll find something you love, too. Blind Date with a Book was so popular last year that we’ve expanded it to music CDs. Pick up your Blind Date with an Album over by the music CDs on the 1st floor.

Blind Dates can be checked out at either a Self Check station or the Help Desk. (Avoid looking at the receipt, though, if you want to keep it a surprise until you get home.) Inside each package, you’ll find a Rate Your Date card to fill in your first impression and let us know how the date went. Return the card to the Help Desk to be entered in a drawing for $25 worth of Molly’s Cupcakes (for books) or $25 in the Iowa City Downtown District (for albums). Many thanks to our generous sponsors!

No Roads Lead to Buxton

by Maeve Clark on February 1st, 2016

Southern Iowa was once the site of a thriving coal mining industry and one of the most interesting coal mining communities was Buxton.  The library bluff creek townshipis hosting a display, No Roads Lead to Buxton, from the African American Museum of Iowa on the first floor of the library during the first week of Black History Month, February 1 – February 7.

BuxtonShaft10Buxton, a once prosperous coal mining community in Bluff Creek Township in northern Monroe County,  holds a special place in Iowa history as a predominantly  black town. Beginning in the 1890s Ben Buxton, the President and principal stockholder of the Consolidation Coal Company and North Western Railroad of Chicago,  recruited black laborers to work in the coal mines of Iowa following strikes by white miners. The majority of the recruits settled in the town of Buxton, founded by the company in 1895 to house the new arrivals.   Most of the miners were from the Virginia and West Virginia coal mining regions. By 1905, Buxton had nearly 2,700 African Americans and 1,990 Europeans, mostly of Swedish, Welsh, and Slovak descent. At its peak in 1910, Buxton’s population was between eight and ten thousand people.

The majority of the leadership roles in Buxton were held by African Americans -the postmaster, superintendent of schools, most of the teachers, two justices of the peace, two constables and two deputy sheriffs. Buxton’s most prominent early resident, E.A. Carter, the son of a black miner who arrived in the 1890s,  is believed to be he first black graduate from the University of Iowa, Medical College, in 1907. Dr. Carter returned to Buxton where he became assistant chief surgeon for Consolidated Coal.  In 1915 he was appointed chief surgeon for the company.  Prominent attorneys and one-time Buxton residents George H. Woodson and Samuel Joe Brown were among the co-founders of the Niagra Movement, a predecessor to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), in 1905.

Schools in Buxton were racially integrated and taught by both black and white instructors. The Consolidated Coal also treated blacks and whites equally, with regards to housing and employment matters. Buxton changed during the start of World War I in France. Coal production had peaked and the black population began to slowly decline. Fires destroyed buildings and homes in Buxton, and by 1919, there were only a few hundred of people left. In 1923, the coal company moved its headquarters and sold out to  the Superior Coal Company in 1925. The Buxton mine  closed in 1927.

Drop by the library to learn more about Buxton, a fascinating chapter in Iowa history.

Mary Cassatt; Extraordinary Impressionist Painter

by Katherine Habley on January 27th, 2016
Mary Cassatt; Extraordinary Impressionist Painter Cover Image

In a new picture book biography by Barbara Herkert, a brief text in language appropriate for K-3 grades tells about the strong-willed girl born in 1860 who wanted to be an artist. At 16 she enrolled in art school and studied at the Academy with all the male students.  She next traveled to Paris to study against her father’s objections.  Like many artists, she copied the Old Masters paintings found in the Louvre Museum.  When her artwork was rejected by the Salon, the impressionist painter, Degas, invited Cassatt to join an independent painters’ group and they broke all the rules by using brilliant tones and splashes of white, pastels and soft blurry images.  She captured on canvas what she saw around her.  For Mary, art was life and life was art.  Although she never married, Cassatt painted many beautiful pastels of mothers and babies.  When her family moved to Paris, she used them as subjects of her heartfelt paintings.  Her art now hangs in museums all over the world.  This book will be encouraging to young artists to pursue their artistic dreams.  Cassatt’s paintings continue to inspire, inform, and uplift people today. The illustrations in this picture book are done by Gabi Swiatkowska of France.  An author’s note and list of sources are included in the back of the book.  Before a trip to the Art Institute of Chicago, check out this title and share it with your youngster.

Dig the Detectorists

by Brent Palmer on January 27th, 2016
Dig the Detectorists Cover Image

I just discovered  a new TV series that has become one of my all-time favorites: The Detectorists.  As the two protagonists keep having to explain, “We’re not metal detectors, we are detectorists”.  That is: they are the guys who operate the metal detectors;  and they take it very seriously.  The show surrounds the efforts of hobbyist treasure hunters who are convinced they are about to discover the lost burial of a Saxon king.  It’s high stakes among the hobby clubs in the area to secure the rights to a farm that is rumored to be a hot prospect.  The show was written and directed by Mackenzie Crook, who you might know as the gung-ho assistant on the British version of The Office.  It is very funny and the dialog is great as is the music and filming.  This is an easy one to binge-watch, so take it easy.  Only watch a couple at a time; there are only six in the first season.




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