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Displays @ ICPL

by Kara Logsden on April 29th, 2015
Display on the "T-Walls" at the Iowa City Public Library

Display on the “T-Walls” at the Iowa City Public Library

The Library Board recently reviewed and updated the Display Policy that governs displays members of the community host at the Library. More information about display space at the Library may be found at www.icpl.org/displays.

According to Board Policy:

The purpose of the Library’s display facilities is to fulfill the Library’s mission and increase awareness of Library resources. The Library provides display facilities for the public and Library use. Exhibits using these facilities shall further one or more of these purposes:

A. To call attention to a theme related to Library services, collections or programs.

B. To bring together Library materials from several subject areas related to a theme of current interest.

C. To highlight current issues, events or other subjects of public interest.

D. To display original art, crafts, photographs or writings created by Iowa artists or contained in traveling exhibits.

E. To explain the activities of, or issues of interest to, local organizations and agencies engaged in educational, recreational,  cultural, intellectual or charitable activities.

F. To display interesting collections or hobbies of local residents.

The next time you are in the Library, browse through the many displays at the Library. They are constantly changing and the information shared in informative and entertaining. If you would like to schedule a display at the Library, please call the Library at 319.356.5200 and ask to be directed to Stacey in Community and Access Services.

Book Babies – Spirit In Motion!

by Karen Gordon on April 29th, 2015

 

music_programs_babies_and_toddlers_program

On Friday, May 1st at 10:30 am
Come sample Spirit in Motion! Nurturing joy through music and movement.
This is a fun, engaging program offered here at Book Babies. You and your baby will explore activities with guest Deb Singer. This early childhood music and movement program includes singing, cuddling, rocking, and dancing.

http://www.spirit-in-motion.org/creative-movement
This program is free.

Through the Woods

by Casey Maynard on April 27th, 2015

Since I was small I have loved fairytales. It began with the original Grimm’s tales my mother read. I remember the illustrations more clearly than anything: the image of Rapunzel’s prince stumThrough the Woods Coverbling and blinded after being thrown from the tower is one I can conjure readily. Since that time, I have read as many fairytales and retellings as I could get my hands on. It is only as an adult that I recognize the why of this love for, even obsession with fairytales that began as a child.  These traditional stories encompass something innately human that has the capacity to be retold in multifarious ways, thus remaining fresh, somehow unencumbered by its own redundancy.

Recently this passion for all things fabled has led me to the work of Emily Carroll.  With many of her graphic short stories debuting online, it was not until July of last year that Carroll’s first book came into print. Through the Woods is a collection of five short stories all of which find their center in the forest. Definitely not your childhood bedtime stories, each is reminiscent of the archetype while simultaneously obliterating the gap between traditional fairytale and horror.through the woods

Where Grimm’s fairy tales hinted at the horror that awaited villains–red-hot iron shoes come to mind–Carroll’s tales thrust the reader into truly terrifying confrontations with evil.  Evil that not only surrounds each of us but has the capacity to be found within us as well.  It is in this way that Emily Carroll’s Through the Woods, leaves the reader unsettled, searching for a happy ending when we know that the journey will begin all over again tomorrow.Into the Woods

Accompanied by beautiful full color illustrations that bleed into text, Carroll’s graphic novel debut is stunning.  She leaves the reader the space to interpret what is left in the darkness of each page, unsaid and just out of reach.

For more of her stories and for a sneak peek of Through the Woods be sure to check out “His Face All Red” and the rest of her website,

Emily Carroll’s Website

through the woods

 

 

 

 

On Air: The ICPL Podcast Episode 11

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on April 24th, 2015

Episode 11 of On Air: The ICPL Podcast is now available.on-air-the-icpl-podcast-large

This month the gang discusses when to quit an ongoing series, as well as entertainment binge-consuming and book clubs!

00:50: What we’re reading/watching/listening to. Brian- “Fadeout” by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips

01:46: Jason- “Vesper for a New Dark Age” by Missy Mazzoli

03:25: Roomfull of Teeth

04:11: Meredith- “A Little Something Different” by Sandy Hall

06:04: Melody- “Dead Heat” by Patricia Briggs

07:05: When do you quit reading a Series?

18:45: TV Binge-Watching

22:33: Binge Listening Music

26:25: Consuming Comic Books

29:45: Melody- Online Book Clubs

30:00: Facebook, A Year in Books

31:30: Literary Classics Online Book Club

33:23: Good Reads

34:22: Vaginal Fantasy, Led by Felicia Day

36:30: Discussion on Classic, In-Person Book Clubs

On Air: The ICPL podcast can be accessed here, or from iTunes or Stitcher.

 

Pie Plant – What’s that and what’s it have to do with Irving B. Weber?

by Maeve Clark on April 23rd, 2015

Rhubarb- Did you know that rhubarb is also known as pie plant?  I hadn’t heard, (or at least I didn’t remember hearing),  rhubarb called pie plant, (or pieplant), until I lived in Dubuque. However, a little online digging shows that term pie plant has been in written use since 1838.  If you are a Laura Ingalls Wilder fan, you might recall that it from a passage in The First Four Years -Laura was cooking for the threshers, the first dinner in her very own little house, and was running through the menu: “There was pie plant in the garden; she must make a couple of pies.”

A discussion of the term came up last month when I attended a meeting Historic Foodies, a local group with an interest in using recipes from the cookbooks of  yesteryear.  We were using The Iowa City Cook Book, and on page 181 one of our members found the recipe below. Pie PlantThe cookbook dates from 1898 and is chock-full of recipes that will invite much discussion.  You might just recognize the names of prominent Iowa City residents of the past.  In fact, while we at the meeting we consulted Margaret Keyes book Nineteenth century home architecture of Iowa City to see if we could locate the recipe writer’s house. When we did we pulled up the Iowa City assessors website to find out if the house was extant.  It was tremendous fun and we found a good number of the names in Dr. Keyes’ book and many of the houses are still here!

So what does all of this have to do with Irving B. Weber?  First, Weber wrote the introduction to Dr. Keyes book.  Second,  while Weber’s mother doesn’t have any recipes in the cookbook, some of his parent’s neighbors do.  Third, we are just about to celebrate Irving B Weber Days,  webera full month of programming and displays dedicated to local history.  Fourth, the Historic Foodies will be providing refreshments from the Iowa City Cook Book for a program during Weber Days. Make sure you mark your calendar to come to Rachel Wobeter’s talking to tour of Iowa City food history.  Rachel will share her research on what Iowa City folk ate between 1830 and 1900 on Wednesday, May 20 at 7  p.m.  The program will air live on Library Channel 2o.

And finally, what  does pie plant have to do with with Irving Weber?  Well, here’s what I think, I bet you anything Irving ate pie plant in either a pie or as a sauce or maybe even like I did as a child, by dipping the stalk in the sugar bowl and taking a great big bite of sour delight.

 

 

Win a $1000 IRA!

by Maeve Clark on April 23rd, 2015

It’s Money Smart Week and the Iowa City Public Library MSWhas a deal for you.  Money Smart Week is a program of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and one of the activities is Dash for the Stash. DASH for the STASH, is an investor education and protection contest. One participant in Iowa will win $1,000 to open or add to an Individual Retirement Account.

The DASH for the STASH contest works much like a scavenger hunt. But instead of collecting objects, players gather information and leave answers to quiz questions on four posters.  Each poster focuses on one investor education and protection topic, and each poster topic features an associated quiz question to answer. To play, participants read the content on each poster, scan the unique QR code to access that topic’s quiz question (multiple choice), and submit their answer via smartphone, tablet, or computer. Participants must have the QR app (free download) on a mobile device in order to scan QR codes and access the quiz.  The posters are located on the first floor Gallery.  The contest runs through Sunday, April 26 at the Iowa City Public Library.

The contest is being sponsored by the nonprofit Investor Protection Institute (IPI) and, in Iowa, the Iowa Insurance Division’s Securities Bureau.

ICPL Friends Foundation hosts Looking Forward fundraiser

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on April 23rd, 2015

The board of the Iowa City Public Library Friends Foundation invites the public to attend Looking Forward.L

This premiere event will be held on Sunday, May 17, at the Library. It is designed to expand horizons, achieve support through reservations and attendance, and continue to build long-standing camaraderie among the Library’s devotees.

The evening begins at 6 p.m. with “The Future: From Fiction to Fact,” a presentation by Dan Reed, the University of Iowa’s Vice President of Research and Economic Development, and Brooks Landon, author and an University of Iowa Professor of English.

Guests will be treated to appetizers and beverages, and will have the opportunity to learn more about the Library during “behind-the-scenes” tours.

The cost to attend Looking Forward is $125 per person and reservations are required. To make yours, visit www.icpl.org/support/looking-forward. Reservations must be received by May 8.

For more information, contact Patty McCarthy, Director of Development, at (319) 356-5249 or patty-mccarthy@icpl.org.

PLAYING is LEARNING

by Nancy Holland on April 23rd, 2015

This is the phrase you are hearing a lot at ICPL recently. The Children’s Room has a new display that emphasizes the  importance of play in early learning, but this is a philosophy the Library has supported for the many (30+) years that I have worked here. I think Hazel Westgate was the first Children’s Librarian to provide toys and activities to engage ICPL’s youngest patrons while parents or caregivers selected books.Nancy blog photo

Since that time the Children’s Room has gone through many transformations and many, many well-used and loved toys. I couldn’t resist snapping a photo of the new playhouse we recently acquired.

New toys are fun for us all! Opportunity for play in the Children’s Room encourages language development and socialization skills. Our staff often share with each other the cute conversations we overhear throughout the day.

Of course providing play opportunities for children requires a constant effort to keep those items safe, clean and attractive. During our most recent remodeling of the children’s area we were able to acquire two sturdy play tables. One is used for train play and the other for Duplo block construction, and they are in use pretty much every hour the library is open.

Check out these and other opportunities for early learning through play at ICPL.

 

Driveway Moments and Talking to my Disc Player

by Kara Logsden on April 21st, 2015
Driveway Moments and Talking to my Disc Player Cover Image

I love listening to recorded books. I often listen in my car and the stories sweep me away. Too often I arrive at my destination and don’t remember the drive there because I’m so wrapped up in listening to a great story. It reminds me of my childhood and my love of being read to.

Currently I’m listening to what I’d typically characterize as a “page turner” – although I don’t think I can call it that when I’m listening. C.J. Box’s new book, Endangered, is set in Wyoming and centers on a crime committed against Joe Pickett’s adopted daughter, April. I’m finding myself talking back to my car’s disc player (“JOE – That’s a clue. Pay attention!”) or sitting in my driveway not wanting to turn the car off without knowing what happens next. The narrator of the story, David Chandler, is perfect and his performance enhances the story.

As you plan your summer road trip vacations, remember to include a trip in to the Library to find a great book for your family to listen to. Library staff are happy to recommend good stories for road trips. And if you see me sitting in my driveway or talking to my car’s disc player, just smile and wave … and remember to ask me which book I was listening to.

 

Video Staff Picks: Rachael Raps!

by John Campbell on April 17th, 2015

Need a fun, musical way to learn United States history? Rachael presents the book Hip-Hop U.S. History, by Flocabulary. Look out for a special presentation of the Bill of Rights rap!




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