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ICPL Celebrates Katherine Habley’s Retirement

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on March 25th, 2016

Katherine1For more than 25 years, Katherine Habley has been a staple at the Iowa City Public Library. From storytime to outreach visits, Totally Tweens programs to organizing the annual children’s chess tournament, Miss Kathy has helped countless children in and around Iowa City discover their love of reading.

Katherine will retire from ICPL on Friday, April 1. To honor her achievements, the Library will have a special celebration with the public during her final storytime.

Join us from 10:30 to 11 a.m. on Wednesday, March 30, as we wish Katherine luck on her next adventure. Refreshments will be served.

For more information, contact the Library at 319-356-5200.

Crazy 8’s Math Club

by Angela Pilkington on March 3rd, 2016

Yesterday afternoon the ICPL hosted it’s first Crazy 8’s Math Club for K-2 grades. The concept for the day was Glow-In-The-Dark Geometry! After the program the kids knew more than I ever did about geometry and had a blast doing it.

What’s glow-in-the-dark geometry, you ask?  Simple -the kids made geometric shapes out of glow sticks-what could be better, or more fun? The kids made all different sizes and shapes of triangles and quadrilaterals. We talked about area, regular polygons and more!  Towards the end of the program, we worked together to lay out the sticks in mystical repeating patterns on the floor, and as they can tell you now, its called a lattice.  We tried triangles, squares and then the tricky hexagons. The best part? When we had our lattice just the way we wanted, out went the lights to reveal our masterpiece!

Crazy 8s was created by the Bedtime Math Foundation to get kids fired up about math. Participants will build things, run and jump, make music – even make a mess – while making friends and increasing their understanding of math. First launched in the winter of 2014, there are currently more than 6,000 clubs nationwide serving 80,000 kids.To find out more information or to participate in their daily math question visit their website at here.

Up next week? Let’s Get Loud!

glowtrikids               Glowtri

Crybaby by Karen Beaumont

by Katherine Habley on February 29th, 2016
Crybaby by Karen Beaumont Cover Image

Karen Beaumont’s newest picture book is a sure-fire hit!  The simple plot in this story is about a baby who wakes up in her crib and does not want to go back to sleep. The family, relatives, and even neighbors try to quiet her down by changing her diaper, tickling baby’s tummy, giving her a bottle, burping her, etc.  But the more they tried, the more she cried.  The old retriever named Roy knows that the baby wants her toy sheep to help her get back to sleep.  However, nobody else is paying any attention to the dog except a tiny mouse seen in most of the humorous illustrations by Eugene Yelchin.  The dog is being chastised when he barks….”No, Roy!  Down, boy!  Baby doesn’t want that toy.” Of course, that is exactly what baby wants and when Roy brings baby’s white and woolly little sheep to her, she grasps it and snuggles down to sleep in her crib immediately.  There is so much more going on in the picture book, Crybaby, than the text alone would indicate. The reader will enjoy discovering funny details through the delightful watercolor illustrations that extend the story.  We see the clock ticking away the time beginning around 1:00 in the morning until 6:00 a.m. as the story progresses.  The repetition of various sounds as the people try to get baby back to sleep is cumulative and makes for a great read-aloud.  But the best part of this fun book are the expressions on the dog’s face throughout the story.  Crybaby will invoke laughter and giggles as you and your little one pour over the pages.  The next time I do storytime about babies I will definitely reach for this title as it begs to be read aloud!

A Bear’s Year by Kathy Duval

by Katherine Habley on February 29th, 2016
A Bear’s Year by Kathy Duval Cover Image

While putting together a winter storytime for preschoolers about hibernation I came across a new book I think is a winner: A Bear’s Year by Kathy Duval and illustrated by Gerry Turley.  This picture book was on the New Book Shelf in the Children’s Room and it is a simple story done in rhyming couplets that explores all four seasons with Mama and her two bear cubs.  Beginning with winter, “Winter Bear drifts into sleep,/ Earth’s snowflake blanket soft and deep.” We see how bears experience each season of the year.  In the spring, “Springtime Bear wakes at last;/ her springtime cubs are growing fast.” Then the Summer Bear “Cubs catch fish, find bees that swarm,/ and dig for roots when days are warm.”  Finally in the autumn, “Coats grow thick, bodies strong./ Soon bears will doze all winter long.”  The artwork is appealing and the book format is large enough for group sharing.  Geared for children 3-6 years old, this title provides accurate information about the lives of bears in the wild, but also helps young children learn about the four seasons of the year.  Turley’s simple but effective illustrations were rendered using drawing and screen printing, which were then pieced together digitally. Duval’s new book would make a lovely gift and children would enjoy cuddling up with Mommy to listen to this story in rhyme.

 

The Goblin’s Puzzle by Andrew S. Chilton

by Morgan Reeves on February 29th, 2016
The Goblin’s Puzzle by Andrew S. Chilton Cover Image

Diversity in middle grade fantasy is hard to come by, particularly high fantasy featuring dragons, goblins, princesses, and kings. The Goblin’s Puzzle by Andrew S. Chilton provides all of these, as well as a good dose of humor and plenty of logic puzzles.

A dark-skinned slave boy with no name finds himself suddenly free, and for the first time in his life able to choose how to live his life. His choice to free a similarly enslaved goblin may provide him with more adventure than he bargained for, as goblins are notoriously tricky creatures. When the goblin tells him that it was not the boy’s fate to be a slave, he sets off to find his true destiny. With the goblin in tow, he learns many things along they way, including how to catch bats with a sling.

At the same time, a dragon has kidnapped Plain Alice, a case of mistaken identity, as he meant to capture Princess Alice. As the dragon goes off to rectify his mistake, Plain Alice begins doing what she does best, thinking. The soon-to-be-captured Princess Alice is at the center of a royal mess, as her father is trying to make her his heir to skip over the obviously evil Duke Geoffrey. To pay for the costly process, Princess Alice is to be married to a suitably wealthy person, to be decided upon by everyone but Princess Alice. All of these plans go literally out the window when Princess Alice is captured by the dragon. If ever there was a need for a nameless hero in search of his destiny, it is here in the Kingdom of West Stanhope.

The boy volunteers to rescue both Alices, though finds he needs their help just as often as they need his. The multiple threads of the story are finally and carefully woven together in a rooftop duel, a royal declaration, and one last trick from the goblin. In another rarity in recent middle grade fantasy, the story ends without a cliff-hanger to lead us to a sequel. Final word: A fantastic, thought-provoking, stand-alone fantasy adventure.

ICPL to Host Crazy 8s Math Club for Kids

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on February 24th, 2016

What do you get when you add hands-on activities plus fun-loving kids? Crazy 8s Math Club!Crazy8sLogo

The Iowa City Public Library is joining the national movement to make math the cool thing to do after school by hosting a Crazy 8s Math Club for kindergarten through second grade students. Beginning March 2, this fun and educational program will meet from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the Storytime Room every Wednesday for eight weeks.

Crazy 8s was created by the Bedtime Math Foundation to get kids fired up about math. Participants will build things, run and jump, make music – even make a mess – while making friends and increasing their understanding of math. First launched in the winter of 2014, there are currently more than 6,000 clubs nationwide serving 80,000 kids.

The Library’s club is open to any child in kindergarten through second grade ready to have fun. Registration isn’t required and participants don’t need to attend every club meeting – but they’ll probably want to! Here’s what we have planned:

March 2: Glow-in-the-Dark Geometry. Join us as we make geometric shapes with glow sticks, including a gleaming Egyptian pyramid!

March 9: Let’s Get Loud. We’ll experiment with water and straws to create different sounds, then build a working flute out of milkshake straws. Find out exactly how loud you are down to the number!

March 16: Time of Your Life. Are you ready to find out what makes you tick? Get ready to race through some crazy stunts, “be” a clock, and see if you have the winning birthday!

March 23: Toilet Paper Olympics. Test your Olympian skills in the shot put, long jump and relay race!

March 30: Spy Training. See if you have what it takes to be a spy. Work to break the clues to find the hidden treasure!

April 6: Flying Marshmallows. Send marshmallows flying through the air using Popsicle sticks and rubber bands. You’ll need to figure out what positions work best and then measure the flight to prove it.

April 13: Zip Line Zoo. It’s time to build a zip line for brave stuffed animals and race them across the room. Measure the distance and time their rides to see how fast they can go!

April 20: Bouncy Dice Explosion. This is your chance to throw things because you’re supposed to! Find out your chances of rolling a 2 or a 5, and then try to be the winning chip on a giant human Bingo board.

For more information, call the Library at 319-356-5200.

Storytime Recap: Black History

by Morgan Reeves on February 21st, 2016
Storytime Recap: Black History Cover Image

Saturday’s family storytime was in honor of Black History Month. We started off by singing a favorite welcome song, “If You’re Happy and You Know It.” After clapping, stomping and saying hello, I talked to everyone about how February is a month full of celebrations. We have Valentine’s Day, President’s Day, plus Black History Month. This is a time to honor the many historic accomplishments and current contributions of black Americans.

The first book we read was We March by Shane W. Evans. This simple story follows a family as they join in the crowds marching to Washington, D.C. to demonstrate for civil rights.

Next we all stood up and moved together as we did the action rhyme “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes.” One time slow and one time fast is always a fun way to repeat these.

Head, shoulders, knees and toes, knees and toes
Head, shoulders, knees and toes, knees and toes
And eyes and ears and mouth and nose
Head, shoulders, knees and toes, knees and toes

Then I introduced our next book by talking about how many contributions black Americans have made to music styles over the years. This Jazz Man by Karen Ehrhardt takes the tune of “This Old Man” and adapts it to a swinging jazz band counting from one to ten. This is a joy to read with the rhythmic beat and scat-style interjections.

Next I asked everyone to join me in singing and moving to “Mr. Sun”

Oh Mr. Sun. Sun. Mr. golden sun. Please shine down on me.
Oh Mr. Sun. Sun. Mr. golden sun. Hiding behind a tree.
These little children are asking you. To please come out so we can play with you.
Oh Mr. Sun. Sun. Mr. golden sun. Please shine down on me

Then I reminded everyone that black or white or somewhere in between, we all start out as babies, so our last story was Please, Baby, Please by Spike Lee and Tonya Lewis Lee. This is a sweet and funny story about a parent asking their mischievous baby to behave.

Then we finished up with our call and response goodbye rhyme.

GoodbyeSong

Our movie today was the animated version of This is the Rope by Jacqueline Woodson, which follows a rope’s uses as it travels with a family from South Carolina to Brooklyn.

 

ICPL children’s event celebrates George Washington Carver

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on February 9th, 2016

The Iowa City Public Library invites students in kindergarten through third grades to celebrate botanist and inventor George Washington Carver during a special Black History Month event from 4 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 16, in the Storytime Room.

George Washington Carver was born into slavery in the 1860s. After slavery was abolished, he attended several schools before earning his high school diploma in Minneapolis, Kansas. He studied botany at Iowa State Agriculture College in Ames. He was the college’s first black student and, eventually, its first black faculty member before serving as Director of Agriculture at the upstart Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

Carver is famous for his agricultural discoveries and inventions. He introduced the idea of crop rotation in the rural South, in which farmers would rotate cotton, which depleted the soil of nutrients, with peanuts, which replenished them, from year to year. Carver devised more than 300 uses for peanuts, including dyes, paints, plastics and gasoline.

Using books, music, artifacts and toys, the Library will celebrate the life and accomplishments of George Washington Carver in an engaging program designed to make history fun.

For more information, call the Library at 319-356-5200.

Just what is 1000 Books?

by Angela Pilkington on February 2nd, 2016

The 1000 Books Before Kindergarten initiative is set to launch in Iowa City this Friday, February 5th! The program is based on an idea that other libraries across the nation are doing, with great success. The program encourages parents of newborns to 5 year-olds to read a wide range of books to their child to help them get a jumpstart on learning and school. Every word you say builds your child’s brain!

The concept is simple, the rewards are priceless. Read any book to your newborn, infant, or toddler. The goal is to have read 1,000 books before your little one starts kindergarten. Does it sound hard? Not really if you think about it. If you read just 1 book a night, you will have read about 365 books in a year. That is 730 books in two years and 1,095 books in three years. If you consider that most children start kindergarten at around 5 years of age, you have more time than you think! The best part? You can repeat books and books they hear at storytimes count too!

The key is perseverance. The program was specifically designed to give babies and toddlers the best start on lifelong reading and learning skills, as well as to help parents and children get in the habit of reading on a regular basis. Doing so will improve kids’ language skills before they enter kindergarten. Can you and should you read more than 1,000 books? YES! Again, this is aimed at getting your child in a good routine of reading every day! So once you hit the goal of 1,000 books, keep on reading!

According to Reading Rockets, a national literacy program, many students enter kindergarten performing below their peers and remain behind as they move through the grades and confront more-challenging reading material. Many children entering Kindergarten are facing up to a 30 million word gap.

I believe that literacy is the cornerstone of learning and reading aloud to children – from the very beginning of a child’s life – creates the best environment for success in school. It’s a gift parents can give to their children that will pay off their whole lives!

The Iowa City Public Library’s new early literacy program 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten will encourage parents to make the time necessary for this essential building block of learning. As children move through the program, they will receive special incentives that have been bought through a generous grant from Pearson. The program will kick off this Friday, February 5. Join us in the Children’s Room for our kick-off event. For more information, log onto our website at: www.icpl.org/1000books or from our press release.

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ICPL to Debut 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on January 29th, 2016

Sharing books and stories is important to a child’s brain development, which is why the Iowa City Public Library is pleased to partner with Pearson for our new 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program.1000 Books Before Kindergarten_GeneralPoster.indd

1,000 Books Before Kindergarten encourages parents and caregivers to do just that: read 1,000 books before the child starts kindergarten. In doing so, they strengthen a child’s language skills and build their vocabulary — two important tools for beginning readers. With the support of a $10,000 Employee Challenge Fund for Literacy grant from Pearson, the Library will assist and encourage parents and caregivers as they help children become lifelong readers.

The program will launch at 11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 5, following Book Babies. Staff from the Library and Pearson will be on hand to register children for 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten. Children also can register at the Children’s Desk during regular Library hours after Feb. 5.

Each participant will go home with a bookmark to track their first 250 books. Once it’s complete, children can bring it to the Children’s Room for their next bookmark, each one in 250 increments, until they’ve read 1,000 books. Children also will receive a prize after completing each level of the program: a book bag after 250 books; a book plate to be inserted in any children’s book in the Library’s collection after 500 books; a growth chart after 750 books; and a new book of their own at 1,000 books.

“We’re so excited to bring this program to our community and want to thank Pearson for their help in making it an experience that will benefit our young patrons for years,” Library Director Susan Craig said.




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