Father’s Day at the Library

by Morgan Reeves on June 18th, 2017

It’s Father’s Day and we are celebrating all of our dynamite dads at the library. We’ve put our favorite books about all kinds of fathers on display in the Children’s Room. Come in to the library to check these out and stop in for our Sunday Funday at 2pm to make a Father’s Day craft.

Read the rest of this entry »

Pajama Storytime Returns!

by Casey Maynard on June 12th, 2017

Would you love to bring your children to storytimes at ICPL but don’t have time during the morning? Have no fear, Pajama Storytime is here! Stop by the children’s storytime room from 6:30-7:00 on the second and fourth Monday of the month in June, July and August where we will be getting roudy and loud before we settle back down for bed. Pajamas are encouraged and stuffed friends, blankets and pillows are all welcome to attend this special evening program!

 

Pajama Storytime is designed with the whole family in mind, babies, toddlers and older siblings are all welcome.

Learn How to Build a Better World

by Morgan Reeves on June 9th, 2017
Learn How to Build a Better World Cover Image

In conjunction with this year’s summer reading program, “Build a Better World,” read about ways people have made the world a better place, how you can help right now, and the possibilities of the future.

Since witnessing the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, J. J. Keki has been working with his neighbors of different religions to coexist peacefully and grow coffee together. By focusing on what unites them, instead of what divides them, this village has created an example of religious tolerance and harmony for the world. Read about it in Growing Peace by Richard Sobol.

Read the rest of this entry »

Kids and Families: Earth Friendly Fridays start June 9!

by Anne Wilmoth on June 5th, 2017

We’ll be having lots of fun every Friday this summer – drop in between 1 and 2 p.m. each week for sustainability, conservation, and nature-themed activities for school-age children during a program called Earth-Friendly Fridays!img_0010

Our first week will be spent mixing up homemade suet and making “upcycled” bird feeders out of kitschy coffee mugs.  Later in the summer, we’ll make wildflower seed bombs, rock and bone necklaces, tee shirt tote bags, local food snacks, and much more.

Some special guests will join us from time to time, too!  You won’t want to miss Professor K.W. Therm and his Energy Extravaganza, for instance – plus Johnson County Master Gardener Jackie Wellborn will tell us how to save the honeybees.

Check out the full Earth Friendly Fridays calendar here.

 

 

 

Stories in the Park begins June 5

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on May 31st, 2017

img_7137_1The Iowa City Public Library’s Stories in the Park summertime outdoor reading series begins June 5 and continues through August 4.

Stories in the Park will be held from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the following locations:

  • Monday at Willow Creek Park, 117 Teg Dr.
  • Wednesday at Wetherby Park, 2400 Taylor Dr.
  • Friday at Mercer Park, 2701 Bradford Dr.

Beginning Wednesday, June 7, the Library’s new Bookmobile will be present at all Stories in the Park dates. Children, parents and caregivers should remember to bring their Library Card in order to check out books and DVDs from the Bookmobile. Anyone who doesn’t have a Library Card can sign up at icpl.org/cards. Bookmobile staff also can issue new Library Cards.

In the event of rain, the Monday and Wednesday storytimes will be held at the Library and the Friday storytimes will be cancelled. However, the Bookmobile will still travel to the parks, rain or shine, so visitors can check out items.

Stories in the Park is an outdoor storytime geared toward children between the ages of three and six. All children in attendance need to be accompanied by a parent or adult caregiver.

Stories in the Park is co-sponsored by the Iowa City Parks and Recreation Department and the Iowa City Public Library. For more information, please call the Library at 319-356-5200.

Little Fox in the Forest

by Casey Maynard on May 26th, 2017

Related imageIn the mood for something cute? Stephanie Graegin’s debut picture book as author and illustrator, Little Fox in the Forest, is a wordless triumph. The story is heartfelt and the pacing of the narrative is perfect for younger readers. This is certainly a book that little ones and adults will enjoy perusing over and over with a great message of friendship. Greagin has illustrated a number of other books in our collection so be sure to check them out.

Image result for little fox in the forest

Free Online Magazines For Kids!

by Angela Pilkington on May 20th, 2017

Kids can get in on the fun and read magazines just for them online for free using the Library’s Zinio service. The best part? Unlimited checkouts, unlimited loan period, no fines, and highlightsno chance of miss-placing the magazine or losing pages!

You can read full digital copies of favorite kid magazines on your computer, tablet or mobile device on Zinio. All you need to know is your library card number and PIN.

Your library card number is located on the back of your library card. When entering your barcode number leave no spaces or dashes between the numbers.  If you have forgotten your PIN, you can reset it: Here.

Zinio requires the creation of two accounts – a library Zinio account to view the Digital Johnson County collection and a free Zinio.com account to read magazines online or via the Zinio Reader app on a mobile device. Users can visit their device’s app store to download and install the Zinio Reader app to read magazines, or usamerican-girle a web browser to browse and check out new issues of Library magazines. So kids, get your grown-up to help or if they have questions about Zinio, let us know! If you prefer to drop in with your device so we can help you get set up, look for our Tech Help experts in the Computer Lab.

After you have your account set up, you can sort the collection to only show children’s magazines to choose a magazine to get started! Digital Johnson County currently offers more than 175 digital magazines, 18 which are for just kids, to residents of Coralville, Iowa City, North Liberty, Hills, Lone Tree, University Heights, and rural Johnson County. You must have a library card from your home library to use this service.

 

For more information, please visit the Coralville Public LibraryIowa City Public Library, or North Liberty Community Library websites.

 

Did I mention these will be perfect to load up on for the upcoming travel season? Happy reading!

 

Read to Get Ready for STEAM Fest!: Picture Book Biographies of STEAM Pioneers

by Anne Wilmoth on May 15th, 2017

There’s nothing I love more than a good picture book biography of a little-known historical figure; something that makes you let out a surprised “Huh!” when you turn the final page.

In honor of this week’s STEAM Festival for children (that’s Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) here are a handful of books on STEAM trailblazers that promise to fascinate the adult reading them aloud just as much as the child listening.

ThThumbnaile Boy Who Loved Math: The Improbable Life of Paul Erdos by Deborah Heiligman

When Paul Erdos was four years old, he liked to amuse strangers by asking them their age, then announcing how many seconds they’d been alive, after just a moment of mental calculation.  Paul grew up into a brilliant but eccentric mathematician – “he didn’t fit into the world in a regular way” and needed his mother and friends to see to his basic needs – who traveled the world working with other mathematicians, doing math up to nineteen hours a day, and coming up with new kinds of math.  Numbers are sprinkled throughout this simply-told, charming story.

Thumbnail Who Says Women Can’t Be Doctors?: The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell by Tanya Lee Stone

Society tried to thwart her at every turn, but the first female doctor in America (she graduated from medical school in 1849), wouldn’t be dissuaded.  In a situation that seems laughable today but was all to real in our country’s history, all the other tenants in the building where she opened her first practice were so horrified that they immediately moved out.  Today, more than half of all U.S. medical school students are women, thanks to Elizabeth Blackwell.

Thumbnail Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine by Laurie Wellmark

Who wouldn’t be fascinated by trying to wrap their mind around the leap from the first computer to the sophisticated, lightning-fast information machine that we all now carry around in our pocket?  Women have been instrumental in computer technology since its inception, starting with Ada Byron Lovelace.  This thinker, tinkerer, and girl fascinated by numbers went on to write the algorithm that allowed her colleague’s Thinking Machine to work – making her the world’s first computer programmer.

Thumbnail Mr. Ferris and His Wheel by Kathryn Gibbs Davis

The Ferris wheel, that mainstay of summer amusement parks across America, got its start at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair.  George Washington Gale Ferris, Jr., a mechanical engineer, won a contest seeking a design more spectacular than the Eiffel Tower, which had wowed attendees at the previous World’s Fair.  The fair committee thought his design couldn’t possibly work and refused to give him the money to build it.  George, despite being laughed out of most banks, eventually secured a loan and paid for the wheel himself; he and wife took the first ride.  The story of this feat of engineering and nostalgic piece of Americana is depicted in illustrations washed in blue and purple that evoke twilight at a state fair, alongside text bursting with fascinating bits of detail.

Thumbnail Balloons Over Brodway: The True Story of the Puppeteer of Macy’s Parade by Melissa Sweet

The little boy who designed a rope-and-pulley system so he could feed the family’s chickens while lying in bed grew up to become the entirely self-taught “father of American puppetry,” the man behind those giant character balloons that millions of people watch on TV every Thanksgiving.  When Tony Sarg came to America, he designed mechanical marionettes for a Macy’s window display.  Later, Macy’s asked him to come up with something more spectacular for the parade than live animals, which were frightening the children – and Tony Sarg’s innovative balloons have risen on Thanksgiving Day every year since 1928.

After finding some inspiration in these books, come down to ICPL’s STEAM Festival and do some problem-solving and discovery of your own!  The STEAM Festival takes place on Friday, May 19 from 9:30-2:30 and Saturday, May 20 from 10-4.

Mother’s Day at the Library

by Morgan Reeves on May 14th, 2017
Mother’s Day at the Library Cover Image

At the library, we love books and we love our moms. So of course, we love books about moms. Here are some new titles and old favorites about all kinds of mothers. Come in to the library today to check these out and make a a special Mother’s Day treat during our Sunday Funday program at 2pm.

And I Have You  by Maggie Smith celebrates the bond between mothers and babies both animal and human.

Read the rest of this entry »

ABC’s Saturday: Art, Books & Children 2017

by Mari Redington on May 4th, 2017

childrens-day-2On Saturday June 3rd, 10 am-3 pm, we are celebrating Art, Books and Children, or the ABC’s, during the Iowa Arts Festival!  Mark your calendars now for this annual event, formerly known as Children’s Day, produced by the Iowa City Public Library with Summer of the Arts. This is a great time to sign up for the ICPL’s summer reading program—Build a Better World. Learn about art, music, science and more with activity booths from local groups and enjoy a show on the Family Stage. With live performances, arts and crafts, fun activities, and Planting Day for ICPL’s Children’s Garden, there’s something for everyone! Read the rest of this entry »