Summer Reading is for Adults too!

by Beth Fisher on June 7th, 2017

build-a-better-world

ICPL’s Summer Reading Program “Build A Better World” began on June 1st and runs through August 11th.  And it’s just not for kids – adults can participate too!  To get entered in the grand prize drawing, all Adults have to do is read 5 books between now and August 11th.  Or read 3 books and attend 2 of the special SRP events.  The events are listed in the ICPL calendar, found on the back of the SRP game card, and listed below.

There are two ways you can participate:  online through our SRP website or with a paperbased game card.   You can pick up a game card at any service desk in the library and you can register for the online version here too or by going to  srp.icpl.org and clicking the Register Now button.

By participating online you’ll also be able to see a variety of book lists made especially for this years Adult SRP and information about the upcoming special Adult Summer Reading Program events:

The Front Porch Music Festival

Wednesday June 7, 7pm, Meeting Room A

The Longfellow neighborhood’s Front Porch Music Festival is a celebration of music-making, inspired by the Water Hill Music Fest in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Now in its third year, the festival includes musicians of all ages and experiences, performing in a wide range of musical styles and traditions, including jazz, classical, folk and rock. Trevor Harvey, Ph.D., Lecturer in Ethnomusicology from the UI School of Music, and one of the co-founders of the Front Porch Music Festival will share the Front Porch story, discussing the value of music in building and sustaining communities. He will be joined by other festival organizers and neighborhood musicians to get us in the mood for the 2017 Festival happening this weekend!

 

All Iowa Reads Book Discussion: Bottomland by Michelle Hoover

Saturday, June 10  10:30am, Meeting Room B

The 2017 All Iowa Reads selection is Bottomland by Michelle Hoover. Glenn Ehrstine, UI Associate Professor of German and International Studies will be here to lead a discussion of Bottomland and Susan Craig, ICPL Director and member of the All Iowa Reads book selection committee, will tell us how the AIR books are chosen each year. Based on the real life story of the author’s grandmother, Bottomland begins in Iowa in the wake of World War I. It follows the Hess family as they attempt to rid themselves of the Anti-German sentiment that left a stain on their name. When the youngest two daughters vanish in the middle of the night, the family must piece together what happened while struggling to maintain their live on the unforgiving Iowa Plains. ‘ In the weeks after Esther and Myrle’s disappearance, their siblings desperately search for the sisters, combing the stark farmlands, their neighbors’ houses, and the unfamiliar world of far-off Chicago. Have the girls run away to another farm? Have they gone to the city to seek a new life? Or were they abducted?

 

Paddling the Iowa River Water – Adventure Awaits

Wednesday, June 14  7:00pm Meeting Room A

The Iowa River Water Trail provides 72 miles of unobstructed paddling from Iowa City to the Mississippi River. Numerous sand bars, campgrounds and communities provide paddlers with opportunities for over night stops and off trail exploration. Learn about this trail and other paddling opportunities in Johnson County and the surrounding area from Brad Freidhof, Conservation Program Manager, Johnson County Conservation Board and member of the Iowa River Friends.

 

Bur Oak Land Trust – Saving our natural areas

Jun 21, 7:00pm Meeting Room A

There is a rich diversity of plant and animal species native to eastern Iowa, but they continue to be threatened by development. Bur Oak Land Trust allows for the effective protection of natural habitats and is a non-profit 501(c)3 corporation whose mission is to protect and conserve the natural areas of Johnson and surrounding counties for future generations. Tammy Wright, Executive Director of Bur Oak land Trust will be here to tell us about the organization and give us an overview of their properties, including Big Grove which we will be touring on Saturday, June 24th.

 

Tour/Hike at the Big Grove Preserve in Solon, IA

June 24, 10:00am at the Big Grove Preserve

As part of the Adult Summer Reading Program, two members of The Bur Oak Land Trust will be leading walking tour of the Big Grove Preserve, a forty-acre woodland adjacent to the Coralville Reservoir off Sugar Bottom Road. The Preserve is part of the original “Big Grove” noted by the first settlers to describe Johnson County’s landscape. The Big Grove was acquired by the Bur Oak Land Trust in 2004 .. In addition to its ownership of the Big Grove, Bur Oak Land Trust holds a conservation easement on eight and a half acres of each ten-acre lot in the Natural Woodlands development. While these easements are not open to public access, they have the effect of increasing the area of protected land and will contribute to the preservation of the area’s ecosystem. Directions: Preserve address is 3999 Starry Night Lane, Solon. Take Prairie du Chien north to Newport Road. Turn right on to Newport Road and continue north to Sugar Bottom Road. Go left onto Sugar Bottom Road, and continue to 245th St NE. Turn left on to 245th and continue onto Starry Night Road/Starry Night Court to a turn-around located at the entrance to the Preserve. (approximately 10 miles/22 minutes from downtown Iowa City) GPS: 41.747830, -91.539481

 

Replacing Ash Trees and Growing Healthy Shade Trees

Jun 28, 7:00pm Meeting Room A

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) damage was discovered in Iowa City in 2016. Tree loss from EAB will increase greatly in the area over the next 5 to 8 years as the damage becomes more extensive. What species of trees are good replacements for Ash trees? How will increasing the diversity among our tree species help avoid this problem in the future? Mark Vitosh, Iowa DNR District Forester will lead us through this discussion and give us suggestions for promoting good health and growth of newly planted trees.

 

Gaia’s Peace Garden – Healing Happens Here

July 5, 7:00pm Meeting Room A

Blair Frank, owner and keeper of Gaia’s Peace Garden will be here to tell us the story of his community garden. The one acre garden, originally created by Blair and his wife Mary Kirkpatrick, was designed form the start to be not only a community gathering place but an example of permaculture practices and chemical free gardening. The garden contains a labyrinth, prairie, butterfly garden, culinary and medicinal herbs, an orchard, and picnic areas to enjoy. It is open daily from morning through evening and is located at 2066 Bristol Drive in Iowa City.

 

Build Your Own Little World – Terrarium Workshop for Teens & Adults

July 8, 10:30am Meeting Room A

Ever wanted to build your own world? Are you fascinated by terrariums or succulents? Join ICPL staffers Beth and Mari for a terrarium workshop for adults. We’ll supply the containers, the succulents, and the rest of the supplies. All you need is your imagination and the willingness to get a little dirty. Attendance at this event is limited to 25. Registration is required, so we know how many plants and containers to purchase.

 

Habitat For Humanity – Building a Better World

July 12, 7:00pm Meeting Room A

Founded in Americus, Georgia, in 1976, Habitat for Humanity today operates around the globe and has helped build, renovate and repair more than 1 million decent, affordable houses sheltering more than 3 million people worldwide. Iowa Valley Habitat for Humanity was founded by a small group of committed volunteers in 1992, and serves low-income families in Johnson, Cedar, Iowa and Washington Counties. Iowa Valley Habitat built its first home in 1994, and today they have helped more than 100 families move into homes of their own. Mark Patton, Executive Director, Iowa Valley Habitat for Humanity will share the Iowa Valley Habitat story and information about their current project in Hills, Iowa and their smaller one-day projects that are a great way to get involved.

 

National Advanced Driving Simulator: Driver distraction

July 19, 7:00pm Meeting Room A

As vehicle technology has become more complex and mobile devices more prevalent, the potential for driver distraction has increased. Dr. John Gaspar, Research Associate with the National Advanced Driving Simulator at the University of Iowa will explore the history and present state of driver distraction research and present a framework for considering distraction in vehicles. The National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS) is a self-sustained transportation safety research center at the University of Iowa. Begun in 1996 by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, NADS utilizes its suite of world-class driving simulators and instrumented vehicles to conduct research studies on the connections between humans and vehicles. From its inception, the mission of NADS has been to help save lives and reduce the costs of vehicle crashes by better understanding the impact of technology, pharmaceuticals and other factors on driving performance.

 

Engineers Without Borders USA At The University Of Iowa

July 26,  7:00pm Meeting Room A

In the world’s toughest places, Engineers Without Borders USA (EWB-USA) is partnering with communities to meet their basic human needs and equip leaders to solve the world’s most pressing challenges. EWB-USA Student Chapter at the University of Iowa partners with communities and organizations in Nicaragua to promote sustainable water development. Craig Just, Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering at UI is the Faculty Advisor for EWB-USA at Iowa. He’ll be here to give us an overview of developing relationships in Nicaragua and the process of developing and implementing water projects there.

 

National Advanced Driving Simulator: The History And Future Of Automated Driving

Aug 2, 7:00pm Meeting Room A

Dr. Daniel McGehee, Director of the National Advanced Driving Simulator and Associate Professor in Mechanical & Industrial Engineering at the University of Iowa will discuss the history of automation in vehicles. While the Google car steals many headlines, automated systems have been in production for decades. How these technologies have matured over the years paints an interesting story – one today’s drivers can learn from. The National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS) is a self-sustained transportation safety research center at the University of Iowa. Begun in 1996 by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, NADS utilizes its suite of world-class driving simulators and instrumented vehicles to conduct research studies on the connections between humans and vehicles. From its inception, the mission of NADS has been to help save lives and reduce the costs of vehicle crashes by better understanding the impact of technology, pharmaceuticals and other factors on driving performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you have a historic archive for the Cedar Rapids Gazette? (Part 2)

by Melody Dworak on July 19th, 2017

Boy, do we ever! In my last post, I directed you to how you can get to the same archives The Gazette website uses, but for free. But that’s just a text-based archive, what if you want to see what the actual newspaper pages look like? Read the rest of this entry »

Themed Book Lists for the Adult Summer Reading Program

by Beth Fisher on June 30th, 2017

booklist-covers-wide

Are you a fan of book lists?  Are you looking for some book suggestions for the 2nd half of the Adult Summer Reading Program?  One of the neat features of our Summer Reading Program software is that it lets us create book lists on any topic we want.

This year’s Summer Reading Program theme is “Build a Better World” which lends itself to all sorts of lists. Some were created by ICPL staff, and other lists we borrowed from other sources because they were really good lists.

To find the book lists, log into the software at srp.icpl.org and click on the Recommendations tab at the top.  There you can choose from the Book Lists or the list of  Adult SRP Events.

booklists

Here are the book lists you’ll find:

All Iowa Reads – 2003 -2017   (14 books)

Best Summer Reads 2017 from Publishers Weekly  (13 books)

Books Becoming Movies in 2018  (9 books)

Build a Better World: Volunteer!  (8 books)

Can One Book Change Your Life? (7 books)

Environmentalists Trying To Make A Difference  (10 books)

Explore Iowa (17 books)

Gardening with Native Plants (7 books)

National Park Guidebooks (11 books)

NPR’s Book Concierge 2017 Best Biographies & Memoirs (21 books)

Top 10 LGBTQ Books – The 2017 Over the Rainbow List   (10 books)

We Can Build It Better (12 books)

Women in Science (11 books)

 

 

 

 

Shaping our roadways : I-380 Planning Study

by Maeve Clark on June 28th, 2017

i380Do you drive to Cedar Rapids? Do you have an opinion about I-380 and the traffic flow between Highway 30 and I-80? Of course you do, everyone does and the Iowa Department of Transportation wants you to share your opinions with them.

The first section of I-380  was opened to traffic on September 19, 1973, connecting the Eastern Iowa Airport to I-80 near Coralville.

I-380 1973 IDOT map

The website Iowa Highways tells the story of when additional miles of I-380 were added.

  • September 19, 1973: First segment, from I-80 to the Cedar Rapids airport exit (#13), then IA 84, opened
  • December 16, 1975: Segment between 5th Avenue SW and 33rd Avenue SW in Cedar Rapids opened
  • June 25, 1976: Segment between 33rd Avenue SW in Cedar Rapids and the airport exit opened
  • June 11, 1979: Segment between 5th Avenue and 7th Street NE in Cedar Rapids opened
  • December 4, 1981: Segment between 7th Street NE and Glass Road/32nd Street NE in Cedar Rapids opened
  • November 17, 1982: Segment between Glass Road/32nd Street and Boyson Road in Hiawatha opened
  • August 9, 1984: Segment from Mitchell Avenue in Waterloo to the end of the US 20 multiplex opened
  • August 14, 1984: Segment from Hiawatha to IA 150 near Urbana opened
  • September 13, 1985: Last segment, between US 20 and IA 150, opened

For true enthusiasts of road history, the website interstate-guide.com give much more detail about I-380 including current photographs of the entrance signs to the I-380 from I-80 as well as historical ones.

 

Come Create a Digital Scrapbook

by Jennifer Eilers on June 28th, 2017
Learn how to take an image and give it polish in Photoshop!

Learn how to take an image and give it polish in Photoshop!

 

In the first class, learn how to use Photoshop to correct and edit any issues with either scanned or digital images. Once some basic skills are covered, the editing fun will begin.  Easy-to-use, portable scanners will be offered for those that would like to include printed photos they have yet to digitize.

Organize and add metadata to the edited images that have been edited in the second class. This process makes the book layout process easier and adds important information to the digital files of the photos that can be important for posterity.

Albums come to life as we learn how to use the book module in Adobe Lightroom in the final class. Albums will be made into PDFs or JPEGs which can be sent to a local printer or shared electronically with family.

If you are interested in making a digital scrapbook, please attend all three sessions. In July we are offering a night class for those of you who can’t get to the library during the day. To register for the classes, you need only enter your information into event registration fields on Wednesday, July 12th or Friday, August 4th. Please contact me if you have specific questions or concerns. I look forward to creating with you!

Want to Pick Up Your Hold on the Bookmobile?

by Anne Mangano on June 7th, 2017

You’re in luck! You can choose the bookmobile as a hold pickup location right in the catalog.

To put a book on hold (or a movie, cd, art print, etc.), click on the Place Hold button. If you are not logged in, the catalog will ask for your library card number and password. The pop-up window will prompt you to choose a pickup location (downtown for the library building and the bookmobile).

catalogholds-for-patronsIt works very similar if you are looking to put a hold on a specific volume, like the second disc in a television season or the third volume in a comic series. In the same window you pick the volume you want and choose your desired pickup location.

volumeholdsencore

Want to make a change to your hold pickup location? You can do that in the catalog too! Log into your account and click on HOLDS. Under PICKUP LOCATION each hold has a drop down menu listing the place you are currently set to pick up your hold. To change a location, use the drop down menu to pick the desired location and click on UPDATE LIST. ***You can make this change as long as the title doesn’t say “In Transit” or “On Holdshelf.”*** Once we’ve set aside an item for you, it has made it to its final destination.

changeholdspatronsFind more information about the bookmobile and its stops on our website: icpl.org/bookmobile.

Pox in the park

by Candice Smith on May 26th, 2017

pesthouseThere are many reasons to take some time and visit Hickory Hill Park: have a picnic in the shelter at the Bloomington St. entrance, take a leisurely stroll and see some native wildflowers, go for a run and get a good workout on the hill up to Pappy Dickens’ Preserve, or go and have a nice, quiet sit at one of the many benches that have been installed recently. But hey, maybe you prefer a little disease and/or history when you’re in the park? If so, then I’ve got a walk for you…we’re going to visit the pest house in Hickory Hill Park!

Pest houses were used for a number of years to provide quarantine of patients who were infected with communicable diseases such as small pox and tuberculosis; this was the solution during a time when many hospitals did not have isolation wards and vaccinations had not been implemented to such a degree that the disease was wiped out. It may seem incredibly antiquated, but even Iowa City had a number of pest houses during the years of 1881-1920s; the one in Hickory Hill was the last. While there is very little to see there, we will be able to fill in the picture a bit with information from old Press Citizen articles and a few pictures from Margaret Beck, Assistant Professor in the UI Anthropology Department, who did a mapping project of the site in 2011. If you can’t make the walk with us, but are interested in learning more, stop by the Info Desk at the Library to use our databases, microfilm, and other historical resources.

Celebration(?) of Spring

by Mary Estle-Smith on May 1st, 2017

The great thing about spring  every year, is the window of super ambition to get after projects around my house and yard.  While this window is sometimes remarkably small,  I do want to take advantage of it while I can.  There are always things I have been either wanting to do, or more likely, putting off for a long time that need attention.

If you are in project mode,  there  many materials that will help you get started and guide you through your various projects.  You can do a search for “home improvement” and come up with a bunch of choices. I have listed a few to get you started.

The Homeowners Ultimate Tool Guide is a good place to start.  My husband always stresses the right tool for right-toolthe job,  my skills used to lean toward a hammer and duct tape for way too many things.  I have now seen the error of my ways!  Also power tools are cool!

 

 

chix-fixChix can Fix   is a catchy title that I was attracted to.   I aspire to be a fixer.

 

 

refreshIf you have lower impact projects in mind Refresh Home can provide some inspiration for you.

 

I want to become a runner. Where do I start?

by Melody Dworak on April 25th, 2017
Running icon by Dillon Arloff, from The Noun Project (retouched).

Icon by Dillon Arloff.

Good question! It’s been such a beautiful spring so far, why *wouldn’t* you be inspired to start running? I, myself, have started running again and am happy to point out a free resource to take someone from the couch to a 5K.

Read the rest of this entry »

Finding Sophie Scholl in the ICPL databases

by Jennifer Eilers on March 30th, 2017

68d0608718321ac4308fdeb0094bb925This morning a crowd of very excited middle schoolers from a local school bounded up to the second floor of the library to do research. Having other excited researchers flooding up the quiet, second floor stairs buoys the heart of a librarian like nothing else. I spoke with their teacher about the project they were working on. The students wanted to know how media played a role in the resistance movements against the Nazi party in WWII.

The group of girls I talked to were going to put on a play about the White Rose Movement. I had never heard about this movement before or Hans and Sophie Scholl. Before even coming up to the desk, the girls had basically cleaned the library out of all obvious available books and DVDs we had on the subject, so, my challenge was to see what else I could find about the group to point them to. Read the rest of this entry »