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A new quilt book: No Scrap Left Behind

by Beth Fisher on February 26th, 2017
A new quilt book:  No Scrap Left Behind Cover Image

One of the things I like best about working at ICPL is how easy it is to walk through the new book sections. This week I found a book that I’ve added to my list to buy.

Written by quilt blogger Amanda Jean Nyberg  No Scrap Left Behind – 16 Quilt Projects That Celebrate Scraps of All Sizes made me almost giddy when I saw it.  I love quilts made up of many different fabrics – either true scraps left over from other projects, or quarter yards of fabrics purchase just because I love the fabric.

Every quilt project produces fabric scraps, but not everyone saves scraps.  Those of us who do each have our own definition of what a scrap is. For me a scrap is anything bigger than 2 square inches.  Smaller than than that hits the recycle bag.  (You did know you can recycle/compost cotton fabrics, right?)

scrapsNo Scrap Left Behind starts with a bit about Jean Nyberg herself and her quilting, then she talks about how she organizes and stores her own scraps. She leads you through thinking about a scrap project – from deciding what fabric colors you want to use to how to decide when an individual fabric does or does not work with your project. She explains color values and how context can make or break a fabric (some fabrics just do not go together.)

crazy-mom-quiltThere are all sorts of ways to sew with scraps, and Jean Nyberg has helped simplify scrap quilting by designing projects that focus on one basic shape: squares, strips, triangles or snippets.

A fun read with wonderful photographs No Scrap Left Behind is definitely something to check out if you like colorful scrap quilts.  Nyberg is also the coauthor with Cheryl Arkison of Sunday Morning Quilts (2012) and her blog “Crazy Mom Quilts” is even more fun than her books.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remember your Boy Band obsession?

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on February 25th, 2017
Remember your Boy Band obsession? Cover Image

Mine was New Kids on the Block. Theirs were the first concert I attended (Hilton Colosseum in 1988) and, if I’m being honest, the last one, too. (My friends and I attended one of their reunion shows in Minneapolis in 2015. Nelly and TLC were the opening acts. It was the 90s all over again and it was awesome!)

My point is, you never forget your first boy band obsession. Or, if you’re Stella Samuel in Ali Novak’s The Heartbreakers, you never stop mocking your sister for her boy band obsession, also called The Heartbreakers. Stella is more indie music, not the pseudo-punk her sister loves, yet she’s on a mission to secure autographs of the hottest band around for her sister’s birthday present.

Read the rest of this entry »

Pee-wee’s Big Adventure

by Tom Jordan on February 17th, 2017

One of my family’s Sunday evening rituals is watching a movie after supper.  Finding one we’re all likely to enjoy is a challenge.  The Princess Bride, The Karate Kid, and The Jungle Book are recent winners, so now my children know Mr. Miyogi and Miracle Max – that’s a real feel-good for a parent who grew up in the eighties. miracle-max

This past Sunday, we settled on Pee-wee’s Big Adventure.  It quickly became apparent that I was the only one enjoying it.  While I was laughing out loud, my eleven-year old became increasingly annoyed and started groaning and sighing and saying things like “Why is he talking like that!? Ughhghhh.” The younger two kids seemed mildly amused and said they liked it, but I think they were enjoying their older sister’s annoyance more.  My wife endured stoically…we stopped about half way through to start the bedtime routine.  Read the rest of this entry »

Did you have a super special Valentine’s Day?

by Mary Estle-Smith on February 16th, 2017

If you did, congratulations!!  Now you may be interested in some of the great books we have  to assist you through the exciting but stressful process of planning your wedding.   There are titles to help you with every kind of event from the lavish extravaganza to an intimate and/or budget friendly gathering.

home jacket blogHere  are just a few samples of the many books available to guide you through everything. Lots of information on Dresses and cake,  music and vows,  and even to who  should sit next to whom.

You can also visit this site for venues, and other services available both locally and in the surrounding  area.

 

New Children’s Nonfiction Books to Celebrate Black History Month

by Mari Redington on February 10th, 2017

bhmFebruary has been a busy month for the Children’s Room. Well, it’s pretty much always a busy time for us, but with Valentine’s Day, the 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten anniversary, and the One Book, Two Book festival coming up, we wanted to be sure to offer some great programs and resources for children to learn about black history in our country. For upcoming programs for kids and adults, see our Black History Month series in the calendar. And be sure to check our Black History Month book display and the Behind the Beat: African American Music display by the African American Museum of Iowa, both located in the Children’s Room. Here are some of my favorite newer nonfiction books I’ve been reading this month to learn more.  Read the rest of this entry »

The Couple Next Door

by Heidi Kuchta on February 9th, 2017

If you are feeling a bit blah these February days, why not pick up a thriller? The Couple Next Door by Shari Lapena was just what I needed to get me out of a winter reading rut. The book introduces us to young professionals Anne and Marco, who arcouple-next-doore struggling to adjust to life as new parents. Marco convinces Anne to step out for a dinner party at the couple’s house next door. Begrudgingly, Anne agrees, and goes to the party with her baby monitor and hopes of turning in early. Later that evening when they go home, their baby girl Cora has been kidnapped. From there, events move quickly, unfurling a spiral of secrets. This fast-paced tale is part mystery, part psychological thriller. It is a quick read which you will likely find difficult to put down!

Brooklyn Then and Now

by Elyse Miller on February 9th, 2017

This morning IPR began a “one-day” fundraiser at 6:00 am. One of the musical segues was “How Deep is Your Love,” by the Bee Gees. Corny, and not altogether appropriate for the circumstance, I thought. We are “living in a world of rules breaking us down,” but public radio fundraising is not that world.

And, I could not get the song out of my head. Dylan, my two-year old silver standard poodle, pricked up his ears as I sang out loud, a capella. Not pretty. Not sure he liked it. And I started thinking about the movie from which the song emanated, “Saturday Night Fever.” I came to work, went to the movie area on the 1st floor, retrieved, and checked out ICPL’s copy of the 30th Anniversary Special Collector’s Edition. I plan to immerse myself in the song and eliminate its worminess. At least that is my hope.

I asked a number of staffers if they had seen SNF, and, being alot younger than I, to a person all had not seen the movie. And I was a bit disheartened. I was asked if it was about dancing. And it is about dancing. And it is John Travolta’s breakout role. But it is also, and more importantly, about socio-economics, and finding a way out of the neighborhood, in any way you can. In this case, the neighborhood is Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. In the 70’s. When it was not hipsterish to live there. When it was a place one yearned to leave by whatever means possible. Paint store clerk loser by day, dance floor king at night.

Times have changed. Now Brooklyn (okay, I was born there) represents the arts, and craftiness, and cooldom. But I like to think the spirit of Tony Manero lives on, despite Brooklyn’s renaissance and emergence as the hippest place to be (okay I was born there).

So I’m gonna go home, put on the 30th anniversary edition, remember where I came from, and how it used to be, and dance my a off.

 

 

So Big by Edna Ferber

by Anne Mangano on February 8th, 2017
So Big by Edna Ferber Cover Image

Selina Peake doesn’t have a lot of options when her father, a professional gambler, is killed by a stray bullet in a Chicago gambling parlor. This being the turn-of-the-century, Selina, armed only with an education and enough money for two dresses (one in burgundy cashmere), decides to become a school teacher and takes a position in the Dutch farming community of High Prairie just outside of the city. Let’s Read the rest of this entry »

No-Cry Sleep Training for Noobs

by Melody Dworak on February 2nd, 2017
Budeme všichni spát by Czech artist Barbora Bálková, via WikiMedia

Budeme všichni spát by Czech artist Barbora Bálková, via WikiMedia

A week ago, I begged experienced mom and fellow Info Desk staffer, Jen, for help finding books on sleep-training for new parents like me who don’t know what they’re doing.

“I can’t do Cry It Out!” I cried. We got a Dewey number for me to check the shelf, and she promised to get back to me with a couple titles that would be right up my alley as a tears-adverse bedtime executive. Read the rest of this entry »

The Race for Paris by Meg Waite Clayton

by Kara Logsden on January 30th, 2017
The Race for Paris by Meg Waite Clayton Cover Image

Wednesday Sisters author, Meg Waite Clayton’s, newest novel, The Race for Paris, captures the fictionalized story of two women who served as journalists during World War II. Clayton layers the story between the brutality of war, determination of the women, and the personal toll a war takes on the human spirit. Her research about women journalists in WWII brings their spirit to life and tells a lesser-known story about WWII heroes.

Liv is an Associated Press photographer who is determined to be the first photo journalist in a liberated Paris. She joins forces with Jane, a reporter who is unsure about this challenge but reluctant to abandon her friend. Together they disobey orders, barter for gasoline and supplies, and stay on the outskirts of the press camps as they make their way across France.

I listened to this story and Jennifer Ikeda’s narration is excellent. I was sad when the novel came to an end. It’s always a pleasure to find a book with excellent storytelling, a compelling plot, and solid characters who the reader cares about.




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