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Video Staff Picks: New & Favorite Cookbooks for Fall 2016

by Bond Drager on November 7th, 2016

More Animal Facts! The Illustrated Compendium of Amazing Animal Facts

by Maeve Clark on November 3rd, 2016
More Animal Facts! The Illustrated Compendium of Amazing Animal Facts Cover Image

¨Let’s have an animal fact a day. Melody posted on Tuesday about “Weird Animal Facts” and right next to it on the nesea ottersw shelf is “The Illustrated Compendium of Amazing Animal Facts” by Maja Safstrom. Well, it was on the shelf until I snatched it up and checked it out. This delightful little book written and illustrated by Safstrom.   Every page contains an illustration and one or two or three animal facts.  Safstrom’s Instagram shows her flipping through each page.

Here’s today’s amazing animal fact – badgers dig amazing underground dens that can have up to 50 exits (!) and host several badger families.  And here an animal fact for tomorrow, (you know you can never ever have too many animal facts, said the reference librarian), a group of flamingos is called a flamboyance.   If you want to know more animal facts check out “The Illustrated Compendium of Amazing Animal Facts” or you can call, email or chat or even better visit the Info Desk; we have animal and every other kind of facts at the ready.

Under-the-Radar Read: Sad Animal Facts

by Melody Dworak on November 1st, 2016
Under-the-Radar Read: Sad Animal Facts Cover Image

Here’s another book I came across while cataloging and just had to put on hold: Sad Animal Facts by Brooke Barker. Flatiron Books’ promo line reads “A delightful and quirky compendium of the Animal Kingdom’s more unfortunate truths, with over 150 hand-drawn illustrations,”–and that’s exactly what it is. Delightful illustrations with quirky facts about each animal.

 

 

Facts include the following:

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Speaking American by Josh Katz

by Anne Mangano on October 30th, 2016
Speaking American by Josh Katz Cover Image

Tonight we celebrate the night before Halloween. Well, we don’t. We have no word for such a concept. But if you find yourself in Michigan (Devil’s Night) or northern Vermont (Cabbage Night), or parts of New Jersey (Mischief Night), or other parts of New Jersey (Goosey Night), or even other parts of New Jersey (Gate Night), they are celebrating something, most likely by doing something they shouldn’t, and you’ll need to know what to call it. Josh Katz’s new book, Speaking American is here to help sort that all out for you.

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The Light of Paris by Eleanor Brown

by Kara Logsden on October 28th, 2016
The Light of Paris by Eleanor Brown Cover Image

Weird Sisters author, Eleanor Brown’s Light of Paris is a tale of two women who are bound by the expectations of family, society, and their own personal fears.

Madeleine is in her thirties, stuck in a loveless marriage, and volunteering as a docent at an art museum in Chicago. Youthful dreams of living as an artist are too painful to remember.

Margie is in her twenties and is dispatched to Paris in 1924 to chaperone her cousin. Upon her arrival she is abandoned by her cousin and left to fend for herself. With dreams of becoming a writer and living independently, she gets a job in a library in Paris and falls in love.

The story evolves as the reader switches between characters, decades and cities. Will the women find self actualization or will they conform to the conventions of expectations?

I listened to the book and Cassandra Campbell’s narration is excellent.

Historical Fiction with All the Thrills

by Anne Mangano on October 26th, 2016
Historical Fiction with All the Thrills Cover Image

We are well into autumn and the days are getting shorter, the leaves are falling, and there is a crispness in the air. It is the perfect time to curl up with a good book. This fall, why not transport yourself to a different time and place with a historical thriller?

If you want history with a dose of mystery than Matthew Carr’s The Devils of Cardona is your book. Judge Read the rest of this entry »

Lois Lowry in Iowa City November 16th

by Kara Logsden on October 25th, 2016

2016 10 Lois LowryThe UI Lecture Committee is hosting Lois Lowry at The Englert Theatre on Wednesday November 16th at 7:30 PM. The program is FREE and open to the public. Seating is first come, first seated. More information is available HERE.

Lois Lowry is the author of two of my favorite books: The Giver and Number the Stars. Both are Newbery Award winners. She’s also the author of over forty books and many are perennial favorites of Library readers. Iowa City Public Library hosted Ms. Lowry in 2012 and she presented a wonderful program, which is available to view online HERE via the Library’s Video Stream (video.icpl.org).

Some of my favorite memories growing up in Iowa City include visiting authors and the experience of hearing a beloved author reading from their book. My most memorable experience was hearing Madeline L’Engle read at Old Brick when I was in junior high. L’Engle’s words came alive in my mind as I listened to her read.

Mark your calendars for Wednesday November 16th at 7:30 at The Englert. I’m sure it will be a wonderful program!

 

Fresh Picks: Election Edition

by Morgan Reeves on October 19th, 2016
Fresh Picks: Election Edition Cover Image

It may seem like this election season may never end, but soon enough it will be Election Day (November 8th this year) and we will have a new president. While kids may not be able to have an official say just yet, they can check out some of our newest presidential reads from the jNonfiction section. Read the rest of this entry »

Video Staff Picks: New nonfiction for fall 2016 with Terri

by Bond Drager on October 18th, 2016

American Cake by Anne Byrn

by Anne Mangano on October 17th, 2016
American Cake by Anne Byrn Cover Image

I love history. And I love cake. So Anne Byrn’s new baking book, American Cake spoke to me. Byrn provides a timeline of American history through recipes, from gingerbread and sugar cakes of colonial times to more recent favorites like tres leches or beet velvet cake. Each recipe includes the cake’s significance, whether a change in cooking techniques and ingredients to major societal and technological shifts, as well as an updated recipe.

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