Storytime Recap: Royal Wedding Celebration

by on May 23rd, 2018

Children’s storytimes over the weekend and early this week were designed to celebrate the wedding of Prince Harry and Miss Meghan Markle on May 19 in Windsor, with books, songs and rhymes focused on princes and princesses, British culture, and fairy tales.

We read the Robert Munsch classic The Paper Bag Princess, in which a princess saves her prince from a dragon, only to be rejected by him for not looking princess-like enough, prompting her to call him a “bum” and happily skip off into the sunset alone. Children also enjoyed hearing The Queen’s Handbag by Steve Antony, in which the Queen chases a swan who has made off with her handbag around the United Kingdom, stopping in at such vaunted British landmarks as Stonehenge, Oxford, and Edinburgh Castle.

We sang songs that allowed us to practice bowing and curtsying like princes and princesses; recited Mother Goose rhymes about serving and drinking tea; marched like the Grand Old Duke of York; tapped our boots like knights; made hats out of scarves; and had some color identification and math practice with flannel stories about a rainbow of sparkly crowns and a troupe of multicolored dragons.

The British library recently put two medieval manuscripts on display that feature stunning images – gold and ermine, gifts and feasting – of royal weddings of the past. Take a look and compare royal weddings then and now. Also, in case you missed it, enjoy the best candid photos of the recent royal wedding published by Harper’s Bazaar and view the official photographs shared by CNN.

ABC’s Saturday: Art, Books & Children 2018

by on May 22nd, 2018

 

The Arts Fest is the unofficial kick-off of summer in Iowa City, so be sure to bring your whole family down to Clinton Street for all of the fun, free activities perfect for children of all ages.

On Saturday June 2nd, 11 am-3 pm, we are celebrating Art, Books and Children, or the ABC’s, during the Iowa Arts Festival!  Mark your calendars now for this annual event, formerly known as Children’s Day, produced by the Iowa City Public Library with Summer of the Arts. Due to construction in the Ped Mall, all of the children’s activities will be concentrated on Clinton Street between the College Street crosswalk and Washington Street, with the Family Stage at the south end and the bookmobile at the north end. This is a great time to sign up for the ICPL’s summer reading program—Libraries Rock! and visit the ICPL bookmobile!

 

Learn about art, music, science and more with activity booths from local groups and enjoy a show on the Family Stage. With live performances, arts and crafts, fun activities, and the ICPL Bookmobile, there’s something for everyone!

The fun doesn’t end on Saturday! On Sunday, check out the Children’s Global Village, featuring activity booths representing different countries and cultures. Find out more about the Arts Festival, ABC’s: Art, Books and Children on Saturday and Children’s Global village on Sunday from Summer of the Arts!

 

Renowned children’s musician Dino O’Dell

 

Family Stage Schedule:

11:00 AM      After School Specials

11:45 AM      Dino O’Dell

12:30 PM     Herky and the Hawkeye Cheerleaders

1:15 PM         Dream Divas

2:00 PM       Family Folk Machine

 

 

 

 

Activity Booths:

  • ICPL Bookmobile and Summer Reading Program Sign-up
  • Recycled Craft and Games with the 100 Grannies
  • Mason Bee Habitats with Green Iowa AmeriCorps and Iowa City Park and Recreation
  • Furry Friends with Iowa City Animal Care and Adoption Center
  • Rock Painting with the Iowa City Public Library
  • Make Your Mark with the City of Literature
  • Tiles for a Mural with Big Picture Young Artist Studio
  • Paint the Town with ICPL and Blick Art Materials
  • Making Music Together with the Preucil School of Music
  • Girl Scouts of Eastern Iowa and Western Illinois
  • Iowa Children’s Museum
  • Spin Art with Johnson County 4-H
  • Jingle Bracelets with West Music
  • Summertime Shrinky Dinks with ICPL

What is that in the 1868 Bird’s Eye View of Iowa City?

by on May 18th, 2018

While researching the horse racing scene of early Iowa City, my eye moved from the first county fairgrounds to something in the Iowa River—that something being a steamboat. Steamboats in Iowa City in 1868? Didn’t the railroad, reaching Iowa City in 1856 make these boats unnecessary? I always thought that steamboats didn’t make much headway (so many nautical phrases to use) on the Iowa River.

Steamboat depicted in the 1868 Bird's Eye View of Iowa City

Steamboat depicted in the 1868 Bird’s Eye View of Iowa City

And that is somewhat true.

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Storytime Recap: Mother’s Day

by on May 12th, 2018

Tissue paper flowersTomorrow is Mother’s Day, so we had to have a storytime all about how great moms are. There are lots of stories about all kinds of mothers, but today we read about animal moms, new moms, and monster moms. We learned some songs to sing to our mothers to show them how much we love them. We finished up storytime by watching a movie based on the book Is Your Mama a Llama? by Deborah Guarino. Check out the list below of books, songs and rhymes. Don’t forget to come by the library on Sunday to make a special bouquet of paper flowers for the moms in your life.

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No Bookmobile Service May 25 through June 3

by on May 11th, 2018

2017-07-bookmobileThe Bookmobile Spring Schedule concludes on Thursday May 24 and the Summer Schedule begins on Monday June 4, 2018. We’ve had a great Spring and look forward to a busy summer including Stories in the Park programs.

A break between schedule periods gives us time for vehicle maintenance, deep cleaning, and restocking the Bookmobile with great new Library materials.

On days when the Bookmobile is not in service, but the Library is open, Holds and ILLs may be picked up at the Library. We will not capture any holds when the Bookmobile is not in service, so there may be a period of time when the Bookmobile is on break when holds will be at the Library waiting for pick-up. Don’t worry, though, because the 7 day waiting period for picking up a hold does not begin until we “trap” the hold. That’s when we send the eMail, call you on the telephone, or mail your Hold Pick-up Notice.

For full Bookmobile schedule information, navigate to www.icpl.org/bookmobile

Garlic Mustard – an invasive species. See it, pull it!

by on May 10th, 2018

Spring has finally arrived in Iowa City. That means it’s time to keep an eye out for Garlic Mustard. According to the Iowa DNR “Garlic Mustard is a rapidly spreading, highly invasive non-native plant. It was introduced from Europe in mid-1800s for medicinal and herbal uses and came to the U.S. without predatory beetles or other natural controls. Garlic Mustard threatens to rob Iowa of healthy, diverse native woodlands.”

Garlic Mustard is a woodland plant that favors shade or dappled shade, but it will also grow in sun given enough moisture.  Unfortunately wildlife do not eat Garlic Mustard. Human intervention is the only way to control it.

The Iowa Wildlife Federation suggests that if you’re going hiking in your favorite woods take along a big garbage bag and load it up with Garlic Mustard plants before they get a chance to set seed.  Garlic Mustard is not difficult to pull, especially if there has been recent rain. If you wiggle the plant a little then pull at a slight angle, you’ll be less likely to break off the stem leaving the roots to re-sprout.

Do not compost Garlic Mustard in your home compost pile.  Home compost piles do not get hot enough to destroy garlic mustard seeds.  However the City of Iowa City Landfill’s compost piles reach a much higher temperature than needed, so you may put garlic mustard in your City yard waste containers to be picked up with your regular garbage. Read the rest of this entry »

Weber Days Book Display–Read Like It’s 1897

by on May 6th, 2018

A fun piece of Iowa City history lives in our Library’s archives:  the accession books that show the book purchases that the Library made in its early years. The Iowa City Public Library opened on January 21, 1897, and the first 1,050 entries in the first accession book were recorded on January 14, 15, and 16, 1897.  The best part is, we still circulate some of those original titles.

A book display on the first floor gathers together a sampling of the more than one hundred titles that you can still find at ICPL.  Many of the titles are what we call “classic fiction”, and you can probably guess some of the authors represented:  Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Bronte, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Jonathan Swift, William Thackeray, Jules Verne, and William Shakespeare.

There’s a sprinkling of children’s fiction as well: Black Beauty by Anna Sewell, The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling, Little Women and Little Men by Louisa May Alcott, and  Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll to name just a few.

A few entries in the accession book particularly caught my eye: Looking Backward, 2000-1887 by Edward Bellamy (first published in 1888—when the year 2000 must have seemed impossibly far away, and is now in our past); and Confessions of an English Opium-Eater by Thomas De Quincey (still a timely issue, alas). In the publishing norms of the time, the author entry in our accession book for Cranford is written as “Mrs. Gaskell”.  Our catalog today does give the author her full name, Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell.

With poetry, we do not have an exact match in title in many cases, but we still provide collections from authors represented in the Library’s opening day collection. Elizabeth Barrett Browning, John Keats, Henry Longfellow, Alexander Pope, Alfred Tennyson, and William Wordsworth continue to be found at ICPL.

Kick off our month of Weber Days activities by reading a classic book that’s been in circulation in Iowa City for 120 years! And for a full listing of Weber Days events at the Library, look here.

Storytime Recap: Intergenerational Storytime at Emerson Point Assisted Living

by on May 4th, 2018

In honor of National Children’s Book Week, a special storytime was held this week at Emerson Point Assisted Living.

Children of all ages came with their parents and arrayed themselves on the floor in the activities room. Behind them, care facility residents sat in a large half-circle of chairs.

We started with books, songs, and rhymes, focusing on classics that all ages were likely to know – we read oversized book versions of Little Red Hen and The Three Little Kittens, recited some nursery rhymes with the help of flannel board pictures, and sang “Old McDonald,” “The Grand Old Duke of York,” “Row, Row, Row Your Boat,” and others. Erin Moore, the activities director at Emerson Point, accompanied the singing on her guitar.

After enjoying stories together, snacks were laid out. A May basket craft incorporating watercolors and sparkly pipe cleaners was also available. Parents, children and residents mingled, chatted, and made connections as they felt comfortable – though there was no pressure to do so. Simply being together with community members in all phases of life offered social benefits to all in attendance.

Around the country, a handful of public libraries hold periodic storytimes at nursing home facilities. There are even several preschools located within the walls of an elder care facility. A 2017 documentary film, Present Perfect, explores one such intergenerational learning center. Filmmaker Evan Briggs points out how “generationally segregated” American society has become – a phenomenon the preschools and events like this week’s Intergenerational Storytime are trying to combat.

According to The Atlantic, “Numerous studies have linked social interaction with decreased loneliness, delayed mental decline, lower blood pressure, and reduced risk of disease and death in elders. Socializing across generations has also been shown to increase the amount of smiling and conversation among older adults, according to one Japanese study from 2013.”

It was clear at ICPL’s Intergenerational Storytime that the Emerson Point residents found the children a source of joy, and the parents, too, were enthusiastic. One mother commented that without grandparents living nearby, this was a rare and valuable opportunity for her toddler to have meaningful interaction with the elderly. Residents, in turn, were already asking if the children could come back another time.

Free streaming movies!

by on May 2nd, 2018

The Iowa City Public Library is now offering streaming movies from Kanopy.  All you need is a Library card and to be a resident of Iowa City, Hills, Lone Tree, University Heights, or rural Johnson County.
Kanopy set up is easy.  Go to http://icpl.kanopy.com to get started.

You’ll be greeted by this screen:

After clicking “Continue,” click on “Sign Up”:

Kanopy wants your first and last name and an email–you’ll want to use a real email because they have you verify it. Create a password as well:

Kanopy will send you an email to verify your account:


After you have verified your email, it will ask you to add your Library card:

Almost there! You’ll get screen that lets you know how much you can stream per month:

Now you can click on a movie and start watching!

CHOMP on a Good Book

by on May 1st, 2018

No time to pick-up your Holds at the Iowa City Public Library? CHOMP Delivery service can help! Beginning Tuesday May 1, CHOMP will deliver Iowa City Public Library holds to your door.

Once your Holds are ready for pick-up at the Downtown Library, login to www.chomp.delivery and schedule your delivery. CHOMP delivery charges for this service begin at $2.99 plus a $1.49 convenience fee. The total cost depends on how close you live to the Library. CHOMP delivers to Iowa City, Coralville, North Liberty, University Heights, Hills and Tiffin.

CHOMP is a locally-owned delivery service. Although CHOMP traditionally delivers food, they are offering the convenience of delivering Holds from the Downtown Library during regular Library hours. A CHOMP account is required for this service and delivery fees apply.

For more information, navigate to www.chomp.delivery or contact staff at the Iowa City Public Library.