Mock Newbery Nominees 2019: Amal Unbound and The Journey of Little Charlie

by on January 16th, 2019

 Mock Newbery round four is here! Today brings us to two titles that explore slavery and bravery. Aisha Saeed’s “Amal Unbound” shines a light on modern slavery as Amal must find the bravery to stand up to injustice. “The Journey of Little Charlie” by Christopher Paul Curtis is the story of a boy forced to pay off a debt by helping to hunt down runaway slaves.

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Numbers Numbers Numbers

by on January 15th, 2019

Our community LOVES the Library! I’m looking at the report of use of the Library between July 1 and December 31, 2018 and it’s amazing to see the numbers. I know there are many stories about how the Library enriched lives woven through these numbers. Here’s a few snippets that made me smile 🙂

An average of …

208 people walk into the Library every hour we are open.

22 people visit the ICPL Bookmobile each hour it is in service (up from 14 last year!)

378 items were checked out every hour the Library was open.

In addition to this …

The Library hosted 716 non-Library meetings with an estimated 13,708 people attending.

2,847 individuals/groups used one of our Study Rooms on the 2nd Floor.

1,973 Ride and Read Bus Passes were distributed.

eMaterials checkouts were up 66% to 107,207 checkouts of 27,770 items.

Drop-In Tech Help answered 334 tech related questions.

The Info Desk answered 8,104 questions in person and the Switchboard answered 3,018 questions on the phone.

Our ICPL Mobile App was used 63,510 times. It’s available in the Apple App Store and in Google Play.

We mailed 995 packages of Library materials to our At Home patrons.

We sent 1,020 items to collections we support at retirement residences, neighborhood centers and other community sites.

17% of all items returned to the Library were returned at our two remote Book Return locations at First Avenue Hy-Vee and University of Iowa Community Credit Union on Mormon Trek. Library staff empty the Remote Book Returns 365 days a year!

2,549 teens attended 176 programs.

17,514 children attended 376 programs in the Library and 2,820 children attended 135 programs hosted in the community.

3,524 people got new Library Cards.

If you have a story about how the Library enriched your life or what these numbers mean to you, we’d love to hear from you!

No Bookmobile Service on Monday, Jan. 21

by on January 14th, 2019

The Iowa City Public Library Bookmobile will not be in service on Monday, January 21. The Downtown Library will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The Bookmobile’s holiday hours are always available on the Library’s website.

Even though the Bookmobile won’t be on the road, online services are available 24/7 at www.icpl.org. This includes account access and, for those who live in our service area, access to ICPL’s Digital Library including eBooks, eAudiobooks, eMagazines, The New York Times and Kanopy video streaming.

We’ll see you back on the Bookmobile or at the Downtown Library on Jan. 22

Early season tax information

by on January 11th, 2019

Due to the federal government shutdown and tax code changes enacted last year, we are not sure what to expect with regards to receiving our regular order of federal paper tax forms for individuals and businesses. If you are hoping to pick up free federal forms from ICPL you can keep checking our Tax Programs information page and we will update the red notice box at the top when they arrive.

The Iowa Department of Revenue does not provide us with free individual state forms but we can print them for 10 cents per page at the second floor Info Desk.

VITA free tax help events happening at ICPL are also listed at the bottom of our Tax Programs information page as calendar entries. For eligibility, what to bring, as well as other times and locations visit Beta Alpha Psi’s VITA page.

Iowa Rent Reimbursement forms are now available for download via the Iowa Department of Revenue’s page and we will provide free copies of this for those that ask at the Info Desk.

Books and Music Benefits Child’s Brain Development

by on January 11th, 2019

Singing – is one of the Five Early Literacy Practices, and preschoolers, toddlers, and babies love to sing! We Children’s librarians love to sing in all our storytimes! We encourage parents to sing with their children and remind parents that kids don’t care how their parents sound, they love their parent’s voices, so sing! And, not only are songs fun, but they also serve as a learning tool for children as they reinforce early childhood concepts.

Singing is a natural way to learn about language and helps children develop listening skills and pay attention to the rhymes and rhythms in spoken language. Picture books can be read by being sung. I like to model singing picture books in Book Babies whenever I can.

I also sing books with toddlers and preschoolers during my outreach visits.  I’ve noticed that when I sing using a book, it has a wonderful way of focusing and calming kids down. Sing songs more than once, because children learn by repetition. Singing with children helps them to hear different parts of words, slows language down so they notice how syllables are alike and different, and songs help boost vocabulary and general knowledge. Here are several books to share with your little ones. Check them out and have fun singing!

 

One of my favorite illustrators is Tim Hopgood. Tim’s bright and colorful pictures make these songs come alive. If you never knew the lyrics to these songs, here’s your chance and guaranteed to get stuck in your head.

Here’s a list of books you can sing along to.

Imagine!

by on January 11th, 2019

ImagineThis week we are taking a look at Raúl Colón’s wordless title, ‘Imagine’. Following a young boy as he travels to and through the Museum of Modern Art, ‘Imagine’ is a visual fantasy tour of New York and of individual creativity.

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New Year, New Bookmobile Schedule

by on January 8th, 2019

After our seasonal service break the Bookmobile is back in action! Our Winter/Spring schedule began on January 7, 2019 and extends through May 23, 2019. The newest stops that we have added to our route include weekly visits to Shimek Elementary, Good Shepherd Center, Pheasant Ridge Neighborhood Center, and Hills Elementary. Keep in mind, all ICPL Bookmobile stops are open to the public and all (excluding the UI College of Medicine Courtyard) offer free, nearby parking.

If you’ve considered visiting the Bookmobile, but have not yet stopped in maybe now is the right time! Don’t have a library card (or lost your old one)? Not a problem! We can issue new cards on the Bookmobile – Adults, just bring a photo ID and we can set you up with library services in a matter of minutes. More information about getting a library card can be found here.

While we feel ready for Spring weather, our calendars tell us Winter is still going strong. Now is a great time to make note of our weather policy. The Bookmobile will not operate on days when inclement weather would result in hazardous driving or service conditions, including any day the Iowa City Community School District cancels due to weather. If this were to occur, public web announcements will be able to be found on our website.

Cheers to a great new Bookmobile season. I hope to see you on the road!

Drop In Tech Help Times Changed

by on January 7th, 2019

ICPL’s Popular Drop-In Tech Help times are changing.  The new times are:
Tue: 11 am – 2 pm
Wed: 11 am – 2 pm

At Drop-In Tech Help, we try to help patrons with just about any kind of Tech-related question.  We often help people with questions related to using the web, setting up email or getting more from their mobile devices. There are a few things we can’t help with: device repair, setting up routers and getting rid of malware.  As always the service is free but we encourage users to be patient and respectful of others while waiting their turn.

Note: Senior Tech Zone time is still Thu: 10:30 am – 12:30 pm.

 

Dreamers

by on January 4th, 2019

DreamersThis week’s mock Caldecott title is Yuyi Morales’s “Dreamers”. Part memoir, part ode to reading, books, and libraries–I’ve been casually referring to this one with other staff as ‘medal bait’ with good reason. In telling us her own immigration story, Morales reveals the power that stories, libraries as institutions, and librarians as people have to impact our communities and the world in meaningful ways. And she does so resplendently.

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The Best Books I Read in 2018

by on January 3rd, 2019

As a new reading year dawns, I’d like to recommend some of my favorite reads of the past year. Mind you, these are books not necessarily published in 2018, but all are books that I eagerly devoured during 2018.

Adult books: 38 nonfiction; 29 fiction

Juvenile/YA books: 3 nonfiction; 44 fiction

Total: 114

Because it’s impossible to judge adult and children’s books on the same plane, I have to enthuse about my favorites in each category.

Top 5 Adult Fiction I Read This Year:

ThumbnailNine Perfect StrangersLiane Moriarty (2018)

In Moriarty’s newest book, nine strangers meet on a remote Australian health retreat. Each chapter is told from the perspective of a different guest, and we learn incrementally about the background of each and their reasons for joining the retreat. This book is laugh-out-loud funny and then becomes creepy – Moriarty is a master of the slow-building thriller. Events become more and more outlandish as the plot builds but in a completely delicious way. The ending is a little weak but by that point you don’t care because the roller coaster has been so exciting.

ThumbnailEligible Curtis Sittenfeld (2016)

I feel defensive of this book because I don’t want people to dismiss it as fluffy “chick lit.” The cover image doesn’t help, but please believe me when I say that Sittenfeld has some of the most sharp, incisive, crisp (and hilarious) writing you’ll ever read here. (If a man writes a book about relationships, it’s taken for granted as valuable literature appropriate for the edification of all, whereas if a woman writes about relationships, it’s frivolous, idiotic “chick lit” that would only appeal to other women [i.e., no one important]…okay, that’s a whole other blog post.) Anyway, this is a modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice, in which the five single, adult Bennet sisters return to their childhood home in Ohio after their father’s health scare and their mother obsesses about marrying them off.

ThumbnailThe Underground RailroadColson Whitehead (2016)

Despite the fact that this book won the National Book Award, the Pulitzer Prize, and was an Oprah’s Book Club pick, I was skeptical when I heard that in this book, the Underground Railroad is a real, literal train operating underneath the ground. BECAUSE I DON’T LIKE MAGICAL REALISM. However, I gave it a try anyway, and I was so glad I did, because my mind was absolutely blown by this book. Protagonist Cora endures unthinkable suffering in bondage before her daring escape North, state by state, on the Underground Railroad, launching a twist-filled, page-turning narrative (and the train thing just works). It’s difficult to read, to say the least, but the sanitized version of slavery that fills school history books is not enough to understand our American legacy.

ThumbnailClock DanceAnne Tyler (2018)

Tyler has written 22 novels, but this is the first of hers I’d ever read. This book’s protagonist is Willa, and the book is divided into four sections that describe the four defining periods of her life. In the final section, her son’s ex-girlfriend (who Willa barely knows) is temporarily sidelined with an injury and Willa ends up moving in with the ex-girlfriend and her young daughter in an unfamiliar city. Tyler’s style is fairly understated, in that the details are richly observed, the characters are deeply developed, and the reader is left to largely draw her own conclusions. Some conclusions: women’s choices have been constrained in different ways throughout history; women have been taught to be quiet and not make a fuss about anything; in the modern world, you might have to actively create your own community.

ThumbnailMrs. FletcherTom Perrotta (2017)

In case you haven’t noticed, I like female-driven fiction. In this book, Eve Fletcher is a middle-aged single mother of one son. When he leaves for college, Eve is at loose ends. Then she experiences something of a sexual reawakening when she receives an anonymous late-night “sext,” at the same time she is trying to decide how to address her son’s casual misogyny. Her fixation on this digital overture begins to affect other areas of her life – this book is filled with ethical dilemmas and has much to say that is timely and relevant about gender relations and expectations.

Top 5 Adult Nonfiction:

ThumbnailNomadland: Surviving America in the 21st CenturyJessica Bruder (2017)

You know how you see older adults rambling down the highways of America in their RVs, and you think they’re taking it easy now that they’ve retired, seeing the sights on a great road trip? Well, that might not be the case. This book describes a new, low-cost labor pool exploited by America’s corporations: transient older adults, who lost everything in the Great Recession or simply can’t afford to retire at all, who live full-time in vehicles and work as campground hosts, seasonal Amazon warehouse workers, Adventureland ride operators, or at other short-term, scattered hustles across the country, many of which offer poor working conditions. Prepare to have your eyes opened by this stunning work of investigative journalism, in which author Bruder spent months living in a camper van to document this group, hidden in plain sight.

ThumbnailStranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True HermitMichael Finkel (2017)

This book tells the shocking true story of Christopher Knight, who unceremoniously took to the woods in 1986, when he was 20 years old, and reemerged almost three decades later. During that time, Knight lived alone, year-round, without once seeing or speaking to another human being, in the woods of Maine. Knight had no real agenda or statement to make – he just really, really preferred to be alone. So much so that he stole from nearby summer cabins and camps to survive and evaded law enforcement for thirty years. This is a fascinating account of one man’s dedication to life on his terms.

ThumbnailThe Not Quite States of America: Dispatches from the Territories and Other Far-Flung Outposts of the USADoug Mack (2017)

This was the first book I read in 2018, and it stuck with me the whole year. If, like me, you know nothing about America’s territories beyond a vague awareness that they exist, you will find this book incredibly enlightening. There is a section dedicated to each of America’s five inhabited territories, and interesting facts abound – for example, I didn’t know American Samoa has the highest rate of military enlistment of any U.S. state or territory. (This is despite the fact that those born in American Samoa, unlike those born in any of the other five inhabited territories, are considered U.S. nationals, not U.S. citizens). This book is written as an exciting travelogue, as Mack travels to each territory and writes about the culture, landscape, and history of each location.

ThumbnailSmall Animals: Parenthood in the Age of FearKim Brooks (2018)

It all started when Brooks ran briefly into a suburban Target and left her three-year-old son alone in the car. After she was arrested and battling child-endangerment charges, Brooks began researching the modern-day hysteria surrounding child safety. (Spoiler alert: kids have a literally one-in-a-million chance of being snatched by a stranger off the street.) Brooks, self-deprecatingly and with humor, examines how parenting has changed over the years and the role fear plays in modern parenting.

 

ThumbnailNorthland: A 4,000 Mile Journey Along America’s Forgotten BorderPorter Fox (2018)

Fox travels by canoe, car, foot, and steamship along the longest land border between two countries in all the world: the border between the U.S. and Canada. Along the way, Fox examines the history of the border region, including the indigenous peoples and European exploration; how climate change has affected the Great Lakes region; the political climate’s influence on borderlands; and the modern culture of those who live along the border. Fun fact: though the vast majority of American resources go to protecting our border with Mexico, the only two known terrorists who have crossed overland into America have come in from Canada. Also, Fox lovingly describes the breathtaking landscapes so you’ll want to go canoe and camp in the Boundary Waters immediately.

Top 5 Juvenile/YA Fiction:

ThumbnailThe Watsons Go to Birmingham, 1963 Christopher Paul Curtis (1995)

I have never laughed so hard while reading a book! This multi-award-winning book by autoworker-turned-author Curtis describes one summer in the life of 10-year-old Kenny, a kid tortured by his teenage brother Byron, who is an “official juvenile delinquent” in early-1960s Flint, Michigan. In an attempt to straighten Byron out, the Watsons embark on a road trip to Alabama to visit an intimidating older relation. Some poignant moments hint at what’s to come, but the stunning ending will take your breath away.

 

ThumbnailLong Way Down Jason Reynolds (2017)

In another multi-award-winner, Will’s older brother is shot and killed in an act of gang-related violence, and Will, consumed by with shock and grief, grabs his brother’s gun from their home and goes to avenge his death. However, on the elevator ride down from their apartment to the street, the elevator begins stopping at every floor to admit the ghost of a person from Will’s life who was killed previously by gun violence. They all have a story to tell that influences Will’s understanding of the code of the streets by which he’s always abided – in the end, what will Will choose to do? This book is written in staccato verse, takes place over just 60 seconds, and will leave you reeling. A good choice for reluctant readers, as it can be read quickly and the story is extremely compelling.

ThumbnailMidnight Without a MoonLinda Williams Jackson (2017)

This work of historical fiction describes a summer in the life of Rose Lee Carter, who lives a harsh existence with her grandparents on a sharecropper plantation in Mississippi in 1955. When Emmett Till is murdered nearby, fear and anger reverberate through the community, ultimately leading to some hard choices for Rose Lee. What I enjoyed most about this book are the fully-developed, multi-faceted characters, the nuanced – never simplistic – portrayal of conditions in the American South in this period, and the bold dialogue.

 

ThumbnailThree Times LuckySheila Turnage (2012)

Strong female protagonist Moses LeBeau, a “rising sixth grader” in the tiny town of Tupelo Landing, North Carolina, has a mystery to solve. When a local eccentric turns up dead, Mo and her best friend Dale (named after Dale Earnhardt), find themselves evading a smooth-talking, out-of-town lawman while they attempt to pinpoint the killer themselves. Mo’s own existence is something of a mystery, seeing as she washed ashore in a hurricane and is being raised by two more eccentrics, who own the local cafe. Mo’s Southern voice is delightful here, and wisdom and wit fill every page (“I’m Baptist. So far, Fast or Never is the only speeds I got with forgiving.”) The book is funny, and the suspenseful mystery keeps the pages turning.

ThumbnailA Case in Any CaseUlf Nilsson (2016)

I don’t know why, but any children’s book translated from the Swedish is a pure delight, and this book is no exception. The third in a series (the first two were just as good), lovable curmudgeon Detective Gordon (a frog) and his deputy Detective Buffy  Then, when two mouse children go missing during a class outing, Gordon and Buffy must find them! A sweet and gentle mystery perfect for reading aloud to children ages three and up, this book is so cute and funny that I had to read certain bits over several times, just to let the pleasure sink in. (“It was all the forest children from the kindergarten on an expedition. Buffy saluted the teacher mouse at the front of the line. The children all wore flowery tops and backpacks.”) The messages of kindness, community, and looking out for one another were welcome, too.

Happy reading! Did you have a reading goal in 2018? What were some of your favorites?