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African American music exhibit

by on August 20th, 2015

BehindTheBeat_500pxJust in time for the Soul Fest next week, check out our Behind the Beat exhibit near the magazine area on the first floor.  On loan from the African American Museum of Iowa, the display explores the development of African American music from its roots in Africa to modern-day hip hop.

Want more on this topic?  I recommend searching the online catalog for music history for books, or search soul music as a subject to find music CDs.

ICPL announces Summer Reading Program prize winners

by on August 20th, 2015

The Iowa City Public Library ended the 2015 Summer Reading Program with strong participation numbers among all age levels – babies, kids, teens, and adults.srpwinnerscomiccollage

In all, 4,721 patrons registered for the 2015 Summer Reading Program, with 2,246 participants turning in completed game cards by Aug. 9.

The kids program had the highest number of registrants – 2,878 people – and the highest completion rate – 1,455 people.

More than 1,000 adults signed up for the program, with 434 turning in completed game cards.

The teen program had 399 registrations and 148 returned completed game cards, while the babies program had 420 registrations and 209 game cards returned to the Children’s Room.

All completed game cards were entered in a drawing for the Summer Reading Program Grand Prize, which varied depending on the program level. The winners were chosen by a random drawing and contacted by Library staff.

Congratulations to everyone who received a Summer Reading Program prize and thank you to all who participated!

Babies Summer Reading Program Grand Prize: A $50 gift card to Prairie Lights

  • Winner: Maggi Kaalberg

Kids Summer Reading Program Grand Prize: A $150 VISA gift card

  • Winner: Yousef Ismail

Participants in the teen and adult Summer Reading Programs were eligible for one of multiple prizes.

The prize winners in the teen program are:

  •  $50 Marcus Theaters gift card: Maria Brown
  •  $50 Prairie Lights gift card: Emalyn Foster
  •  $50 Game Stop gift card: John Bounds
  •  $50 Pancheros gift card: Daniel Kelly

The prize winners in the adult program are:

  • Two one-year memberships to FilmScene: Amanda Bellis and Heather Steward-Tharp
  •  $50 Downtown Iowa City gift certificate: Kayla Feil
  •  $50 gift certificate to A & A Pagliai’s Pizza: Wendy Berry
  • Pair of 2-hour Paddle Passes at the Terry Trueblood Recreation Area: Vernona Myers

Second prize winners in the teen and adult Summer Reading Programs received a $5 gift certificate to spend at Taste of Iowa City. The winners of this prize are: Mya Kahle; Alyssa Skala; Sadie Widmer; Adrian Dale; Daniel Bodin; Chuck Henderson; Sommer Gilbert; Jennie Fischer; Eric Bodin; and Bev Amoroso.

Vote Now to Send ICPL’s Local Music Project to SXSW

by on August 19th, 2015

The Iowa City Public Library broke new ground when it launched the Local Music Project in 2012 to promote local musicians and Johnson County’s live music culture. Since then, libraries across the country have taken up the call to be distributors of local music.

ICPL was the first. The Santa Cruz Public Library in California is the latest. Representatives from both libraries could make an appearance on a panel at the 2016 South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive Festival in Austin, TX.

“Gain Fans and Get Paid with Library Distribution” is under consideration for the 2016 lineup as part of SXSW’s PanelPicker practice. The PanelPicker is a two-step online process that allows the SXSW community to have a significant voice in programming SXSW conference activities, including presentations, panels, discussions and demonstrations.

PanelPicker voting is open through Friday, Sept. 4. To vote, visit panelpicker.sxsw.com. You will need to create an account if you don’t have one. The direct link to vote for the “Gain Fans and Get Paid with Library Distribution” panel is: http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/vote/52622

“When we launched the Local Music Project, it was to create another outlet in which local musicians could share their music with the masses,” Jason Paulios, adult services librarian, said. “To be part of the biggest music event in the country and share our experience in hopes of helping more libraries and local musicians collaborate would be a great honor.”

To learn more about the Local Music Project, visit music.icpl.org.

For more information, contact the Library at (319) 356-5200.

ICPL Launches Music is the Word Series with Musical Revue

by on August 19th, 2015

The Iowa City Public Library will kick off nine months of special programming with the Music is the Word Musical Revue at 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 20, at The Englert Theatre.

The revue will feature live performances by local musicians playing everything from bluegrass and rock to vocal choir and ethnic love songs. Performers include The Beggermen with the Champagne Academy of Irish Dance; Kol Shira; the Extra Credit Project; Cedar County Cobras; The Recliners; Combined Efforts Theatre Men’s Choir; and Chase Garrett.

“We want to showcase the wide variety of musical talent in Iowa City,” Paul Bethke of Children’s Services said. “At the same time, we see this concert as an opportunity to introduce new genres to the audience – adults and children – who might not otherwise experience it.”

The Library’s Music is the Word celebration is to help our community welcome the University of Iowa School of Music building to downtown Iowa City, currently scheduled to open in the fall of 2016. Weekly programs focused on all things musical are scheduled from September 2015 through May 2016.

“The Musical Revue is the first of what will be nine months of programming of all types for all ages,” Library Director Susan Craig says. “This is an opportunity for us to share Iowa City’s rich musical culture through live performances, presentations, displays, hands-on activities, movies, and sing-alongs.”

“This is an exciting time in our community, as we prepare for the opening of the UI School of Music downtown and adding to Iowa City’s abundant musical complexity,” said Maeve Clark, the Library’s coordinator of adult services.

General admission tickets for MITW Musical Revue are $10 each; children 5 and under are free. Everyone must have a ticket to the show, free or paid, to gain entry to the Englert.

Tickets are for sale at Library’s first floor Help Desk at the Library and The Englert Theatre’s website at www.englert.org.

All performers are donating their time and talent to the Musical Revue. Ticket proceeds will help support additional Music is the Word programming.

For a list of Music is the Word events, visit www.icpl.org/mitw. For more information, contact the Library at (319) 356-5200.

ICPL to Host All Iowa Reads 2015 Book Discussion

by on August 19th, 2015

The Iowa City Public Library will host a discussion about the 2015 All Iowa Reads book, “My Name is Mary Sutter” by Robin Oliveira, from noon to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 2.

Twenty-year-old Mary Sutter is a brilliant, head-strong midwife in Albany, New York, who dreams of becoming a surgeon. Determined to overcome the prejudice against women in medicine, she leaves home for Washington, D.C., to help tend the legions of Civil War wounded.

“My Name Is Mary Sutter” received the 2011 Michael Shaara Prize for Excellence in Civil War Fiction and the 2010 American Historical Fiction Honorable Mention from the Langum Charitable Trust.

All Iowa Reads was established in 2003 as a way to foster a sense of unity through reading, with Iowans throughout the state coming together to read and discuss a single book title in the same year. The program is sponsored by the Iowa Center for the Book.

For more information about ICPL’s book discussion, contact the Library at (319) 356-5200.

Moving Season

by on August 18th, 2015

This one is for you, Mom.  As Iowa City residents know, it’s that time of year and, this time, I was going to be part of the chaos.  As I was talking about how stressful things were, my mom said, “You should write about this in your blog.”  At that time I thought, “Ugh!  I’m calling you as a procrastination or avoidance technique.”  But now that I have “settled” into my new place, I realized she was right so here you are.

 

39 Apartments cover.phpMoving Day cover.phpAccording to Jonah Winter, Beethoven had to change his address 39 times, including 5 pianos.  This picture book (2006) is filled with interesting facts and whimsical illustrations.  Reading it will make most moves seem quite easy in comparison.  The Berenstain Bears’ Moving Day (1981) by Stan and Jan Berenstain depicts a more realistic undertaking.

 

Bromeliad Trilogy cover.phpThe Bromeliad Trilogy (1998) by Terry Pratchett features 4-inch tall creatures called nomes who originated from another planet; consider them to be alien Littles or Borrowers.  In the beginning, they live Outside but too many predators and a scarcity of food convince them to migrate to the Store.  Other nomes already reside there and allow the immigrants to stay.  Soon, through a “great and powerful” object dubbed the Thing, they discover the Store is to be demolished and they must all move again.  This trilogy consists of Truckers (1989), Diggers (1990), and Wings (1990).

 

From the Mixed Up Files cover.phpIn the classic book From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (1967) by E. L. Konigsburg, Claudia Kincaid is bored with her life and decides to run away from home and live in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  She recruits her brother Jamie, primarily as a roommate to help with expenses.  They quickly settle into a routine when, one day, a mysterious marble statue of an angel arrives.  Jamie is ready to return home but Claudia is intrigued and refuses until she resolves the enigma.

 

How to Survive cover.phpHow to Survive a Move (2005) is an advice book that I had not actually read before my relocation, but should have done.  It is comprised of recommendations from everyday people who have already undergone that experience.  Some are amusing and some are “what not to do” but most are beneficial.  Keep this book in mind for the residence reshuffle next year.

 

Whether you are already established in your home or still unpacking boxes, take a break to read about various moves.  Finally, a humongous thank you to all my friends and family who helped me change my residence so I would still have enough sanity to write this blog.

Tales of a Budding Bicyclist Part 2

by on August 18th, 2015

RAGBRAII rode the last day of RAGBRAI this year. The route was from Coralville to Davenport—68 miles—and I absolutely loved it! The best part was the people. The small towns celebrated our arrival. In Atalissa, a row of kids along the road gave riders hi-fives. People in several towns sat at the end of their driveways with hoses and offered to spray riders down to cool them off. About 10 miles away from Davenport, I had to rest, so I stopped and laid down in someone’s lawn. A little girl walked up and asked if I wanted a popsicle. All of this made me smile the biggest smile.

The people riding RAGBRAI were also great. Several times I saw bicyclists with flat tires Bike Repair & Maintenancepulled off to the side of the road. Other riders always stopped to offer assistance or would ask if they needed help. I took comfort in this because I have no idea how to fix a tire. If I had gotten a flat, I would’ve had to rely on the kindness of strangers to get back on the road. I had the thought that I should try to remedy that, and the Library has plenty of books to help teach you how to handle common repairs. One that I really liked was Bike Repair & Maintenance by Christopher Wiggins
. It has big pictures and simple instructions that even I could follow. We have a lot of other titles that you can check out here.

BicyclingI still feel like a bit of a casual rider. There’s a culture around biking that I don’t quite get yet. I’ve been reading two digital magazines that the Library offers through Zinio*– Bicycling and Bicycle Times – to help figure it out. Also, there are a lot of blogs around cycling that I’ve been checking out. One of them, Fat Cyclist, is really good. The author started his blog after he noticed that he had put on some weight and decided to shed the pounds by biking (sounds familiar, right?). He now posts stories about races and bike trips that he goes on. His writing is affable and humorous. He’s also really into mountain biking, and it’s hard not to get excited about it too. Maybe that will be the next thing I’ll try :)

I can’t wait for next year’s RAGBRAI. I need to train more, and I should get some common sense gear (like gloves!) to make the ride more manageable. I want to take more rides around the state. The Library has books about that too. You can find those here. I’ll see you on the trails!

 

*Magazines through Zinio are available to patrons who live in Iowa City, Hills, University Heights, Lone Tree, or rural Johnson County.

ICPL at ICCSD Elementary Schools Ice Cream Social Night

by on August 18th, 2015

The Iowa City Public Library will be present at several Iowa City School District elementary school ice cream socials from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 20.

Staff members will attend the back-to-school ice cream socials at Alexander, Hills, Hoover, Horn, Lemme, Lincoln, Longfellow, Lucas, Mann, Shimek, Twain, Weber, and Grant Wood elementary schools to help students and their families apply for a Library Card. Applicants can complete an application at the event and a Library Card will be mailed to their home address.library-card-300x199

“Our attendance at the elementary schools’ ice cream socials is to ensure that all students are prepared for the new school year with their own Library Card,” said Kara Logsden, ICPL’s Coordinator of Community and Access Services. “We understand that families are especially busy this time of year, so we are happy to do what we can to make the Library Card application process easier.”

People also can apply for a card online at www.icpl.org/cards or in person at the first floor Help Desk any time the Library is open.

For more information, contact the Library at (319) 356-5200.

Jalapenos @ the IC Farmer’s Market

by on August 18th, 2015

Jalapeno Poppers are a family favorite and the Iowa City Farmer’s Market is the best place to purchase fresh jalapenos this time of year. Often these morsels serve as a meal at our house. Baked Poppers can be stored in the refrigerator for a couple days (although they rarely last that long at our house) and are delicious cold as well as reheated.

Jalapeno Peppers from the Iowa City Farmer's Market

Jalapeno Peppers from the Iowa City Farmer’s Market

We have many variations of our Jalapeno Popper recipe and often the final product is contingent on what’s in the refrigerator. Crumbled crispy bacon, goat cheese, and artichoke dip can all be substituted into the basic recipe for delicious results.

One word of caution: Make sure you remove all the seeds from the jalapenos. In general, Jalapeno Poppers are only a bit “warm” – especially with the delicious cheese to cool down the palate. Forgotten seeds can surprise the person eating the popper, though, so caution is needed if consumers are wary of hot food.

Here’s our basic recipe:

Logsden Jalapeno Poppers

Select fresh, large Jalapenos.

Cut off the top and split in half lengthwise.

Remove all seeds.

Fill with cream cheese.

Wrap with Prosciutto (we prefer Iowa-made La Quercia)

Logsden Jalapeno Poppers

Logsden Jalapeno Poppers

Arrange on cooking pan.

Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes. Check after 15.

If you are looking for summer recipe inspiration, browse our catalog or check out the many awesome books at the Library. 641 is the call number to get you started.

Let us know which delicious dishes you are creating from the fresh ingredients you find at the Iowa City Farmer’s Market.

See you at the Market!

 

Year 4 at the Ped Beds!

by on August 17th, 2015

Garden post 8-15The rains have been so timely this summer at the children’s Soup And Salad garden that I’ve only had to water a handful of times. Bumper crops of eggplant, cucumber, herbs have been rolling in for Table To Table. Carrots aren’t too far behind, as well as okra that got a bit of a late start. And, very soon, a new rotation of leeks will be going in.

We’re book ending the season with pre-school storytimes. Our first was in June, and we’ll be having another in September. A carrot theme kicked us off, and a seed-saving focus will bring us into fall harvest. Every teaching garden I’ve ever grown has a component of seed-saving in it. This year you’ll notice that, so far, we can save dill, cilantro, buckwheat and cherry tomatoes.  (One of the funnest parts of spring is finding little tomato seedlings sprouting on their own after the snow melts, as seed from the prior autumn dried on the vine and dropped to the soil!)

The light purple cabbage is the color of summer. And its companion, celery, isn’t far behind.  A resident chipmunk stands guard, alternating between both beds in her secret tunnels. Maybe I can get her to help us harvest the potatoes as we get closer to frost (can’t believe I just used that word).

Once again, I’m just blown away by the respect this space is given by people from all walks of life. The daily connections I have with folks truly embody the meaning of community. Usually we talk about veggies, which is always a good thing.  As the post in the east bed says in many different languages, “May Peace Prevail On Earth.”

-Scott Koepke,   New Pi Soilmates garden education service for children





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