Golden Hill: A Novel of Old New York

by on September 16th, 2017
Golden Hill:  A Novel of Old New York Cover Image

New York City. It’s a place where our heroes and heroines of literature go to reinvent themselves. They strike it rich or find themselves desolate. They seek fame or become part of the multitudes of anonymous men in gray flannel suits. New York City can easily play this part. It is a cultural and economic powerhouse and America’s largest city. As Fitzgerald says, the city has “all the mystery and the beauty in the world.”

Francis Spufford shows us a different New York in his new novel, Golden Hill. Spufford’s hero, Richard Smith, a young, educated Londoner, arrives Read the rest of this entry »

Iowa Fall Foliage

by on September 15th, 2017
Iowa Fall Foliage Cover Image

If you are wondering why the leaves are changing colors early this year–yes, indeed: it’s because of drought.* According to the U.S. drought monitor, all of Johnson County is colored “abnormally dry” on its Iowa map. This means you’ll have to grab your favorite flora identification books ASAP if you want to go on some lovely, tree and shrub-identifying fall hikes. Read the rest of this entry »

Why I Love Kim Krans

by on September 14th, 2017

For those of you who are unfamiliar with author/illustrator, Kim Krans, I highly recommend her picture books. Not only are they stunning, but her work is highly original and full of whimsy. Both ABC Dream and 123 Dream are wordless, however, Krans uses the format to allow audiences to explore her artwork and discover all the ways her choices align with the numbers and letters represented. They are also a challenge to see how much you and your little ones know about your numbers and letters.

Her most recent picture book, Whose Moon is That? differs from the Dream series in that it’s a short narrative conversation regarding ownership of the moon. The story is sweet, insightful and will get your little ones excited about looking up at our night sky. Image result for kim krans

 

Looking for more fabulous Kim Krans artwork? She is also the creator of the highly acclaimed Wild Unknown Tarot.

Party at Plaza Towers for ICPL!

by on September 13th, 2017

Are you as curious as I am to experience the one-of-a-kind homes and see the views from the Library’s neighbor?! You can do both and help ICPL by making reservations now for a unique vertical block party on September 30th.

ICPL Rocks My Block@Plaza Towers is a fundraiser for the Iowa City Public Library on Saturday, September 30, 4:30-7:30pm at Plaza Towers, across the City Plaza from the Library at 221 East College Street. Guests will tour four unique homes of various sizes (1100, 1500, 2200, and 3300 sq. ft.) before gathering at Neumann Monson Architects to learn about the design and construction of the building. Light refreshments will be served. And, thanks to the marvelous generosity of our hosts, Joyce and Dick Summerwill, Linda and Ed Farkas, Suzanne Lagina, Jim Mondanaro, Neumann Monson Architects, and McComas-Lacina Construction as event sponsor, all proceeds will benefit the Library. $50 per person with reservations required. Make your reservations today for ICPL Rocks My Block at Plaza Towers. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

UPDATE! Downtime for digital magazines tonight CANCELLED

by on September 13th, 2017

The downtime expected tonight for our digital magazine service is no longer happening. We will post new information as we have it for future updates to the app and website.

Managing your library account? There’s an app for that.

by on September 12th, 2017

Last December we released our mobile app called MyICPL and it has some great functionality for using the library. Here’s a highlight of some of its features.

App interface - shows buttons for accounts, search, scan, social, hours & contact, and eventsApp interface - shows the menu with lines emphasizing Feedback

Manage Your Account(s)

If you’re wanting to keep track of the items you have borrowed, the app will save your account information and you can check it as often as you need to. Have an item that is due soon? Renew it from within the app. Or if you are waiting for an item, see what your position is in the hold line.

Have kids? It’s also handy if you want to keep track of due dates on multiple accounts. Add each account once and see all items in one list. You can make sure they are returning their books on time.

Find Upcoming Events

Check the events in the coming week at the Library. Find one you are interested in? Add it to your phone’s calendar directly from the app.

Check Our Collection

There are a couple of ways to find out if we have something at the library. If you’re looking at books in a bookstore, scan the ISBN barcode on the back of the book to see if we have it. You can also search by title if you don’t have the book in hand. Looking for something we don’t have? It will link you to the form where you can suggest we purchase it or ask to have it sent here from another library.

Problems or suggestions?

Let us know if you have features you’d like to see in the app or if you run into any issues with it. We’re continuing to work on fixing bugs when we find them as well as implementing new functionality. There’s a link to a feedback form in the app so you can easily contact us with app-related comments while you’re using it.

Interested in trying it out? Download it from the Apple Store or from Google Play.

Download our app from the Apple App Store Download our app from the Google Play Store

School Board Election Tuesday September 12

by on September 12th, 2017

Voters may be looking for more information about the School Board Election and Bond Referendum vote TODAY – Tuesday September 12th. Early voting concluded on Monday September 11. On Election Day, all voters must vote at their polling place.

Polls are open from 7 AM to 8 PM. Note – your voting location is your school polling place, which for most voters is different from your regular polling location. Information about school polling places may be found at http://www.johnson-county.com/dept_auditor_elections.aspx?id=14272

If you have questions or need help voting, please contact the Johnson County Auditor’s Office at 319-356-6004 or visit their webpage at http://www.johnson-county.com/dept_auditor.aspx?id=12195

On Election Night, links to voting results are available online at the Auditor’s Office at http://www.johnson-county.com/dept_auditor_elections.aspx?id=22134

 

Downtime for digital magazines on Sept. 13

by on September 11th, 2017

System down at 7 p.m.

UPDATE September 13: Upgrades have been cancelled for tonight. Please go about using the service as normal.

Digital magazines on the RBdigital platform will not be available on Wednesday, September 13, starting at 7 p.m. Central time. This downtime is expected to last for about 8 hours, and we are told it will affect both the app and the website that hosts the digital magazine collection.

Thank you for your patience!

FALLing in Love with the Bookmobile

by on September 7th, 2017

School is in session, the nights are cooling off, and it is hard to make it through a day without seBookmobile at Mercer Parkeing something that is pumpkin-spiced flavored – Fall is here. The Library is welcoming the change in seasons with a new Bookmobile Schedule. The Fall Bookmobile schedule runs from August 28 – December 21 and features multiple new Bookmobile stops, including Waterfront Hy-Vee, Emerson Point, Iowa City Walmart, and Mark Twain Elementary.

 
With nearly two full weeks of service under our belts already we are already making connections at our new and continued stops. Our first visit to Emerson Point felt like a party, with the Bookmobile consistently filled with excited, new visitors, several of whom made use of our accessibility lift.

Read the rest of this entry »

Library Bill of Rights

by on September 7th, 2017
Forrest Spaulding Photograph

Forrest Spaulding Photograph

2017 marks the 100th anniversary Forrest Spaulding’s first appointment as Director of the Des Moines Public Library. He is a pioneer in the Library world for his advocacy for human rights and belief that all people should have free and equal access to information. He is also remembered as a humanitarian and advocate for outreach service. He was named by American Libraries Magazine as one of the 100 most important library leaders of the 20th Century.

Spaulding is best known for writing the Library Bill of Rights (see text below). He started his career as a journalist and learned from time working in Peru about the dangers of censorship. Concerns about censorship increased in the United States in the late 1930’s. Spaulding was pressured to censor items in the Des Moines Public Library collection. His response was a Library Bill of Rights presented to the DMPL Board of Trustees.

The Library Bill of Rights, adopted by the Des Moines Public Library Board of Trustees, was also adopted by the American Library Association on June 19, 1939. It has been amended a few times but the sentiment remains the same. Today it reads:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 19, 1939, by the ALA Council; amended October 14, 1944; June 18, 1948; February 2, 1961; June 27, 1967; January 23, 1980; inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996.

Annually in September, libraries across the country join in celebrating Banned Book Week. This year the celebration starts on September 24th. The Iowa City Public Library has many programs planned for Banned Books Week as well as the annual Carol Spaziani Intellectual Freedom Festival. A highlight of this year’s program is a visit by NPR’s Brooke Gladstone on Sunday September 24th at 2:00 PM at the Englert Theatre.

As I reflect on the Library Bill of Rights and what it means in our community, I am thankful for Forrest Spaulding and the many librarians who have been pioneers in the area of Intellectual Freedom. Their advocacy helps assure our public libraries continue to provide equal access to information and ideas.