Posts Tagged ‘artists’


Art Advisory Committee looking for new members.

by Candice Smith on March 8th, 2016

BAartadvDo you like your Library? Do you like spending money? Do you like art??

If you answered ‘yes’ to these questions, you might also like being part of the Library’s Art Advisory Committee! We’re looking for candidates who are involved and interested in the arts community in some way — artists, framers, instructors, students, gallery employees, collectors and serious enthusiasts — to join the Committee. The Committee is made up of six members, and terms run for three years. One of the primary responsibilities is the judging of artworks submitted to the annual Art Purchase Prize contest, with the winning works being purchased by the Library and added to our Art To Go collection of framed posters and original works that patrons can check out. Other tasks for which the Committee would be called upon include the reviewing and deciding upon any gifted works for Art To Go, as well as any proposals for art to be added to the Library’s permanent collection.

If this sounds like something you’d like to be a part of, fill out an application and return it, in person or via email, to Candice Smith (candice-smith@icpl.org). If you’ve got questions about the Committee, feel free to contact me by email or phone (319-887-6031). In the meantime, stop by the Library and take a look at the Art To Go collection, and take home a couple pieces!

Mary Cassatt; Extraordinary Impressionist Painter

by Katherine Habley on January 27th, 2016
Mary Cassatt; Extraordinary Impressionist Painter Cover Image

In a new picture book biography by Barbara Herkert, a brief text in language appropriate for K-3 grades tells about the strong-willed girl born in 1860 who wanted to be an artist. At 16 she enrolled in art school and studied at the Academy with all the male students.  She next traveled to Paris to study against her father’s objections.  Like many artists, she copied the Old Masters paintings found in the Louvre Museum.  When her artwork was rejected by the Salon, the impressionist painter, Degas, invited Cassatt to join an independent painters’ group and they broke all the rules by using brilliant tones and splashes of white, pastels and soft blurry images.  She captured on canvas what she saw around her.  For Mary, art was life and life was art.  Although she never married, Cassatt painted many beautiful pastels of mothers and babies.  When her family moved to Paris, she used them as subjects of her heartfelt paintings.  Her art now hangs in museums all over the world.  This book will be encouraging to young artists to pursue their artistic dreams.  Cassatt’s paintings continue to inspire, inform, and uplift people today. The illustrations in this picture book are done by Gabi Swiatkowska of France.  An author’s note and list of sources are included in the back of the book.  Before a trip to the Art Institute of Chicago, check out this title and share it with your youngster.