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ICPL Staff Top Picks for 2016: Best of the Best

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 31st, 2016

It’s here! Iowa City Public Library’s Top Picks for 2016!

Staff members nominated more than 100 books released in 2016 as their favorite reads of the year. Those that made this list were nominated by more than one person, which truly makes them the Best of the Best.

Adulthood Is a Myth book cover
American Cake book cover
The Dream Lover book cover
Eligible book cover
A Few of the Girls book cover
The Fireman book cover
Girl Who Drank the Moon book cover
Greetings From Utopia Park book cover
Heartless book cover
Hidden Figures book cover
Morning Star book cover
The Night Gardener book cover
book cover
Raymie Nightingale book cover
Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend book cover
Scrappy Little Nobody book cover
Underground Railroad book cover
When Breath Becomes Air book cover

Two graphic novels tied for the title of Most Recommended Book in 2016:

Snow White book cover
Ghosts book cover


Forget everything you know about Snow White, as Matt Phelan’s illustrated take on this classic tale takes place in New Your City in the 1920s. Samantha White is back after being sent away by her cruel stepmother, the Queen of Follies. Her father, the King of Wall Street, survived the stock market crash only to die from a strange and sudden death. However, that’s not the only mystery Samantha and her “protectors” — seven street urchins — face in what critics have called “a stunning, genre-bending graphic novel.”

In Raina Telgemeier’s Ghost, Catrina and her family have moved to the coast of Northern California because her little sister, Maya, is sick. Cat isn’t happy about leaving her friends, but as she and Maya explore their new home,  a neighbor shares a secret: there are ghosts in Bahía de la Luna. Called a  “can’t miss addition to middle school graphic novel shelves,” Telgemeier’s latest has been praised for “bold colors, superior visual storytelling” by Kirkus Reviews.

Did your favorite read of 2016 make our list?

ICPL Top Staff Picks for 2016: Graphic Novels

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 30th, 2016

It’s believed the term “graphic novel” was coined by Richard Kyle in an 1964 essay, though it didn’t gain popularity until the late 1970s with the publication of Will Eisner’s A Contract with God.

While some in the comics community object to the term, calling it unnecessary, few can argue against the genre’s popularity. Our graphics novel collection has grown so much, we moved it out of the nonfiction stacks and into its own shelving area on the Library’s second floor.

Our nominations for the Best Graphic Novels of the year include both children and adult titles. Children titles can be found in the Children’s Room.

ICPL’s BEST GRAPHIC NOVELS OF 2016graphic-novels

  • Adulthood is a Myth: A Sarah’s Scribbles Collection by Sarah Andersen
  • Mary Wept Over the Feet of Jesus by Chester Brown
  • Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet Book 1 by Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • Dark Night: A True Batman Story by Paul Dini
  • Breaking Cat News: Cats Reporting on the News that Matters to Cats by Georgia Dunn
  • Compass South by Hope Larson
  • March: Book Three by John Lewis
  • Snow White: A Graphic Novel by Matt Phelan
  • Lumberjanes: Volume 3 Terrible Plan by Shannon Watters, Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis and Brooke Allen
  • Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier
  • Paper Girls Vol. 1 by Brian K. Vaughn and Cliff Chang

ICPL Top Staff Picks for 2016: Nonfiction

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 29th, 2016

Nonfiction books run the gamut from history and science to cooking and travel. The titles nominated for our Best of the Best list are certainly eclectic, as is our staff!

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ICPL Top Staff Picks for 2016: Biography and Memoir

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 28th, 2016

Did you know memoir comes from the Latin work memoria, which means making memory or reminiscence?

A memoir is a sub-genre of the autobiography and tends to encompass one time period of an author’s life while a biography and/or autobiography is a detailed description of a person’s entire life.

Here are the lives (or parts of lives) we enjoyed reading about in 2016.

ICPL’s BEST BIOGRAPHIES, AUTOBIOGRAPHIES AND MEMOIRS OF 2016

  • Lust & Wonder by Augusten Burroughsmemoir
  • It Gets Worse by Shane Dawson
  • Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life by Ruth Franklin
  • Charlotte Bronte: A Fiery Heart by Claire Harman
  • Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded by Hannah Hart
  • Greetings From Utopia Park: Surviving a Transcendent Childhood by Claire Hoffman
  • Scrappy Little Nobody by Anna Kendrick
  • You’ll Grow Out of It by Jessi Klein
  • Something New: Tales from a Makeshift Bride by Lucy Knisley
  • The Bridge Ladies by Betsy Lerner
  • I’m Just a Person by Tig Notaro
  • Samurai Rising: The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune by Pamela S. Turner
  • Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance

ICPL Top Staff Picks for 2016: Science Fiction/Fantasy

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 27th, 2016

Science fiction and fantasy novels are known for transporting readers to fantastic locations, taking them on amazing adventures, but they can also serve as a reminder or warning of what could happen. As Ray Bradbury once said, “You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading.”

Fight the power! Read a book! Here are some titles to get you started.

ICPL’s BEST SCIENCE FICTION/FANTASY BOOKS OF 2016scifi-fantasy

  • Morning Star: Book III of The Red Rising Trilogy by Pierce Brown
  • Dark Matter by Blake Crouch
  • The Forgetting Moon by Brian Lee Durfee
  • Death’s End by Cixin Liu
  • A Gathering of Shadows by Victoria Schwab
  • Join by Steve Toutonghi
  • Smoke by Dan Vyleta
  • Invasive by Scott Wendig
  • The Guns of Empire by Django Wexler

ICPL Staff Top Picks for 2016: Mystery

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 26th, 2016

What books will make our list of Best Books of 2016? It’s a mystery, as are these stories.

ICPL’s BEST MYSTERY BOOKS OF 2016mystery

  • The Trespasser by Tana French
  • The Mistletoe Murder: And Other Stories by P.D. James
  • A Great Reckoning by Louise Penny
  • The Secrets of Wishtide by Kate Saunders
  • Missing, Presumed by Susie Steiner
  • No Shred of Evidence by Charles Todd

ICPL Staff Top Picks for 2016: Children’s

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 25th, 2016

“There is no such thing as a child who hates to read; there are only children who have not found the right book.” — Frank Serafini

If your child is searching for their favorite book, or looking for a new title to add to a growing list of beloved stories, check out our favorite children’s books of 2016.

ICPL’s BEST CHILDREN’S BOOKS OF 2016childrens-room

  • Thunder Boy Jr by Sherman Alexie
  • The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill
  • Have You Seen Elephant by David Barrow
  • Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty
  • Eek! Halloween! by Sandra Boynton
  • The Wild Robot by Peter Brown
  • The Goblin’s Puzzle by Andrew S. Chilton
  • Spot, the Cat by Henry Cole
  • Raymie Nightingale by Kate DiCamillo
  • Dragon Was Terrible by Kelly DiPucchio
  • Together by Emma Dodd
  • The Night Gardener by Terry and Eric Fan
  • Bear & Hare — Where’s Bear? By Emily Gravett
  • The Darkest Dark by Chris Hadfield
  • Hotel Bruce by Ryan T. Higgins
  • Flora and the Peacocks by Molly Idle
  • We Found a Hat by Jon Klassen
  • I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark by Debbie Levy
  • The Bear and the Piano by David Litchfield
  • Furthermore by Tahereh Mafi
  • Grumpy Pants by Claire Messer
  • Pax by Sara Pennypacker
  • They All Saw a Cat by Brenden Wenzel
  • Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk
  • Little Red by Bethan Woollvin

ICPL Top Staff Picks 2016: Young Adult

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 24th, 2016

Young adult titles used to dominate our Best of the Best book list. In fact, our most recommended books of 2012 and 2013 were YA titles: Rainbow Rowell’s Eleanor & Park in 2013 and John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars in 2012.

Will it happen again?

You need to check back on December 31 when we release our Top Picks of 2016 in all genres. For now, check out the young adult titles staff members enjoyed.

ya-photoICPL’s BEST YOUNG ADULT BOOKS OF 2016

  • Flawed by Cecelia Ahern
  • A Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro
  • Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow
  • Heartless by Marissa Meyer
  • Cherry by Lindsey Rosin
  • Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys
  • Thanks for the Trouble by Tommy Wallach
  • P.S. I Like You by Kasie West

Have you explored our young adult collection? It’s on the Library’s second floor!

ICPL Top Staff Picks 2016: Fiction

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 23rd, 2016

ICPL staff combed through their 2016 reading logs to select the books they loved for our annual end-of-the-year Staff Top Picks lists.

The nominations were divided into eight categories: fiction; young adult; children’s; mystery; science fiction/fantasy; biography/memoir; nonfiction; and graphic novels. The only rule was that the book had to be released in 2016; books released in hardback in 2014 and paperback in 2015 were disqualified. Any book that was nominated by more than one staff member made our 2016 Best of the Best list.

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ICPL Staff Top Picks for 2015: Best of the Best

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 31st, 2015
ICPL Staff Top Picks for 2015: Best of the Best Cover Image

It’s here! Iowa City Public Library’s Top Picks for 2015!

Staff members nominated more than 100 books released in 2015 as their favorite reads of the year. Those that made this list were nominated by more than one person, which truly makes them the Best of the Best.

  • The Royal We by Heather Cocks and Jessica Morgan (fiction)blue-ribbon
  • Descent by Tim Johnston (fiction)
  • Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy (young adult)
  • An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir (young adult)
  • Simon’s New Bed by Christian Trimmer (children’s)
  • The Wonderful Things You Will Be by Emily Winfield Martin (children’s)
  • The Princess and the Pony by Kate Beaton (children’s)
  • Waiting by Kevin Henkes (children’s)
  • The Cottage in the Woods by Katherine Coville (children’s)
  • Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley (children’s)
  • Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate (children’s)
  • Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith (mystery)
  • Uprooted by Naomi Novik (science fiction/fantasy)
  • Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson (autobiography/biography/memoir)
  • Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling (autobiography/biography/memoir)
  • Girl in a Band by Kim Gordon (autobiography/biography/memoir)
  • On the Move: A Life by Oliver Sacks (autobiography/biography/memoir)
  • Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari (nonfiction)
  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (nonfiction)
  • Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson (nonfiction)
  • Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson (graphic novel)
  • Sunny Side Up by Jennifer and Matthew Holm (graphic novel)

For the second year in a row, two books share the honor of being ICPL’s Most Recommended Book of 2015 — Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate and Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson.

Allplegate’s Crenshaw tells the story of Jackson, a young boy whose family has fallen on hard times. With no money for rent  Crenshaw2and very little for food, Jackson, his parents, his little sister and their dog may have to live in their minivan — again. Jackson’s imaginary friend, a large cat named Crenshaw, wants to help, but is he enough to save a family from losing everything?

Publishers Weekly calls the book “accessible” and “moving” and “… demonstrates how the creative resilience of a child’s mind can soften difficult situations, while exploring the intersection of imagination and truth.” Children’s Librarian Morgan Reeves says Crenshaw is the book she has recommended the most to readers of all ages since its release in September of 2015.

dead wakeDead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania tells the story of a historical event many people think they know, but don’t: the sinking of the Lusitania during WWI.

The luxury ocean liner sailed out of New York en route to Liverpool in 1915, just as WWI was entering its tenth month. Though Germany has declared the seas around Britain a war zone, Captain William Thomas Turner had faith in “the gentlemanly structures of warfare” that had kept civilian ships safe in the past. What follows is one of the greatest tragedies of maritime history. “It’s the other Titanic, the story of a mighty ship sunk not by the grandeur of nature but by the grimness of man,” Hampton Sides writes in his review for The New York Times.

Did your favorite read of 2015 make our list?

If you are looking for more great reads, here are the links to our Best of the Best lists for 2014, 2013 and 2012.

 




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