Posts Tagged ‘biculturism’


Mock Newbery Nominee: Hello Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly

by Morgan Reeves on January 17th, 2018
Mock Newbery Nominee: Hello Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly Cover Image

In the eighth week of our Mock Newbery summaries and reviews we’ll look at Hello Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly. This story of coincidence, fate, and friendship is a quick read with memorable characters. Can it earn your vote?

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Mock Newbery Nominee: Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan

by Morgan Reeves on January 10th, 2018
Mock Newbery Nominee: Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan Cover Image

In the seventh week of our Mock Newbery summaries and reviews we’ll look at Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan. This slice of life story is all about overcoming fears, growing up, and the importance of community.

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Mock Newbery Nominee: Pashmina by Nidhi Chanani

by Morgan Reeves on December 12th, 2017
Mock Newbery Nominee: Pashmina by Nidhi Chanani Cover Image

In the third installment of our Mock Newbery summaries and reviews you’ll have a chance to decide if Pashmina by Nidhi Chanani is a story worthy of your vote. This graphic novel follows Priyanka, a second generation Indian-American, as she struggles with questions of identity and family secrets.

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Pashmina by Nidhi Chanani

by Mari Redington on October 14th, 2017

pashminaAll of the Children’s librarians were abuzz this week after voraciously reading Pashmina, the first graphic novel from artist Nidhi Chanani. Born in Kolkata, Chanani brings her Indian heritage and her talent and love of art together in this story about Priyanka, a young girl who knows very little about India. As a second generation Indian American, Priyanka is torn between two worlds. She tries not to stand out too much at school by shortening her name to Pri, and she doesn’t understand all of the Hindu traditions her family practices at home.

India is her mother’s homeland which she fled at a young age and where she has vowed to never return. Pri can only imagine what it would be like to live in India until she discovers a forgotten pashmina in her mother’s belongings that transports her to beautiful and fantastical Indian landscapes too good to be true. She doesn’t realize the truth about why her mother left until a cash prize from an art contest allows her to travel to India to stay with her aunt. Pashmina explores bicultural and immigrant culture clashes as well as a feminist look at ways women are constrained by patriarchy. Chanani’s beautifully drawn images uses color to draw a clear contrast between Pri’s real life which is shown in pale neutrals and her wondrous visions of India, bright and vivid like the cover art. capture