Posts Tagged ‘Caldecott’


Stop That Yawn!

by Casey Maynard on January 18th, 2019

Stop That Yawn! The last of ICPL’s 2019 Mock Caldecott titles is “Stop that Yawn”, written by Caron Levis and illustrated by LeUyen Pham. From the outset of this title it is clear that this is not your ordinary, quiet bedtime tale.

Gabby Wild’s story starts on the endsheets with her leaning out a window crashing cymbals into a dark and sleepy urban night. Gabby begs Granny to take her “somewhere a-wake” so they head to Never Sleeping City in a plane made out of Gabby’s bed. Once there, Gabby and Granny set out to stay up all night, but even these best laid plans go awry when Granny lets out a large “YAWN” which sets off a chain reaction through the city. From here we move through panel after panel of Gabby and Granny trying to contain the yawn as it spreads through the city, causing its residents to fall asleep.

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Imagine!

by Casey Maynard on January 11th, 2019

ImagineThis week we are taking a look at Raúl Colón’s wordless title, ‘Imagine’. Following a young boy as he travels to and through the Museum of Modern Art, ‘Imagine’ is a visual fantasy tour of New York and of individual creativity.

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Dreamers

by Casey Maynard on January 4th, 2019

DreamersThis week’s mock Caldecott title is Yuyi Morales’s “Dreamers”. Part memoir, part ode to reading, books, and libraries–I’ve been casually referring to this one with other staff as ‘medal bait’ with good reason. In telling us her own immigration story, Morales reveals the power that stories, libraries as institutions, and librarians as people have to impact our communities and the world in meaningful ways. And she does so resplendently.

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Hello Lighthouse

by Casey Maynard on November 23rd, 2018

Hello Lighthouse

The next book up for your consideration in our mock Caldecott series is Sophie Blackall’s “Hello Lighthouse”.  Following a lighthouse and its keeper through their final years together, this story is quietly introspective, bittersweet and informative.

What sets this book apart is its incredible design and Blackall’s attention to details. The moment I picked it up earlier this year I was immediately struck by the shape and feel of the book and how it mimics the tall narrow lighthouse. Yet, inside, Blackall uses circular patterns to illuminate the circular nature of the structure, the cycles of life and the passing of time. Read the rest of this entry »

ICPL’s 2019 Mock Caldecott Awards

by Casey Maynard on November 12th, 2018

In preparation for the ALA’s Youth Media Awards librarians and educators all over the country are talking about who could win, in particular the Newbery and Caldecott. Here at ICPL we like to host our own mini version of the awards in the months leading up to the announcement. This year we have narrowed the field of Caldecott eligible titles to 10. I will review one each Friday until we announce ICPL’s winners on January 25th. Voting for the ICPL’s mock awards will begin on December 1st and run through January 21st.

Without further ado, here is the list of ICPL’s Mock Caldecott contenders for 2019–disclaimer they are listed and will be reviewed in order of publication date.

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Mock Caldecott Reviews: Little Fox & Little Cat

by Casey Maynard on December 1st, 2017

Since last week was Thanksgiving, I am starting the reviews of our ten mock Caldecott titles with a two for one. This week I will be taking a look at Little Fox in the Forest by Stephanie Graegin and Big Cat Little Cat by Elisha Cooper. With these reviews I aim to discuss why a book has been chosen for mock Caldecott consideration without giving too much away–I want you to form your own opinions about these wonderful titles. Without further ado let’s take a look at Little Fox in the Forest  and Big Cat Little Cat. 

Earlier this year I posted a short blog about Stephanie Graegin’s Little Fox in the Forest. Not only is this wordless title absolutely adorable, but the message is heartfelt. Graegin’s use of color as narrative structure is lovely and the movement between spreads and panels sets the pacing of this title apart. Clearly written with children’s sensibilities in mind, the intricate details wrought on every page lend depth to characters and the world Graegin has made. Immensely successful artistically and emotionally, the emotive power of this text is palpable without becoming pedantic.

However, library packaging is problematic here. The endsheets are paramount to the narrative, since the dust jackets have been taped down for circulation some of the intricacies of the story can be lost. I suggest being very gentle and taking a peek under the beautiful wrap around jacket to get a glimpse of both the cover and the endsheets.

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Elisha Cooper’s Big Cat Little Cat is a beautiful homage to love, loss and the nature of change. Set in black and white, utilizing deceptively simple illustrations and large negative spaces, Big Cat Little Cat also serves as an exploration of Yin and Yang.

A black kitten is brought into a family with an adult white cat. We see these two learn, play, grow and of course nap together. The cats are opposites in many ways, coloring, size, age, personality and yet are also completely complementary much like Yin and Yang. The visual reference to the ancient Taoist symbol is made more than once with full bleed illustrations on a striking yellow background. Like Yin and Yang, the cats are separate entities yet create balance and harmony together. The dualistic and transformative nature of Yin and Yang comes into play by the end of the narrative as well.  Simple, powerful and universal, Big Cat Little Cat tackles a tough issue with beauty and tenderness.

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