Posts Tagged ‘children’s books’


Storytime Recap: Intergenerational Storytime at Emerson Point Assisted Living

by Anne Wilmoth on May 4th, 2018

In honor of National Children’s Book Week, a special storytime was held this week at Emerson Point Assisted Living.

Children of all ages came with their parents and arrayed themselves on the floor in the activities room. Behind them, care facility residents sat in a large half-circle of chairs.

We started with books, songs, and rhymes, focusing on classics that all ages were likely to know – we read oversized book versions of Little Red Hen and The Three Little Kittens, recited some nursery rhymes with the help of flannel board pictures, and sang “Old McDonald,” “The Grand Old Duke of York,” “Row, Row, Row Your Boat,” and others. Erin Moore, the activities director at Emerson Point, accompanied the singing on her guitar.

After enjoying stories together, snacks were laid out. A May basket craft incorporating watercolors and sparkly pipe cleaners was also available. Parents, children and residents mingled, chatted, and made connections as they felt comfortable – though there was no pressure to do so. Simply being together with community members in all phases of life offered social benefits to all in attendance.

Around the country, a handful of public libraries hold periodic storytimes at nursing home facilities. There are even several preschools located within the walls of an elder care facility. A 2017 documentary film, Present Perfect, explores one such intergenerational learning center. Filmmaker Evan Briggs points out how “generationally segregated” American society has become – a phenomenon the preschools and events like this week’s Intergenerational Storytime are trying to combat.

According to The Atlantic, “Numerous studies have linked social interaction with decreased loneliness, delayed mental decline, lower blood pressure, and reduced risk of disease and death in elders. Socializing across generations has also been shown to increase the amount of smiling and conversation among older adults, according to one Japanese study from 2013.”

It was clear at ICPL’s Intergenerational Storytime that the Emerson Point residents found the children a source of joy, and the parents, too, were enthusiastic. One mother commented that without grandparents living nearby, this was a rare and valuable opportunity for her toddler to have meaningful interaction with the elderly. Residents, in turn, were already asking if the children could come back another time.

Votes Are In for the 2018 Children’s Choice Award!

by Anne Wilmoth on April 2nd, 2018

Throughout the month of March, ICPL’s young patrons in kindergarten through 6th grade cast their votes for the 2018 Children’s Choice Award. 

The Children’s Choice Award is the only national literary award given completely by children – children in select schools across the country choose the finalists in preliminary voting, after which all kids are invited to make their voice heard in selecting the best book for children published during the previous year.

143 votes were cast, and the winners, in each age category, were tabulated today. The breakdown:

K-2nd grade 

Thumbnail Billy Bloo is Stuck in Goo by Jennifer Hamburg; illustrated by Ross Burach – 14 votes

Thumbnail Pete With No Pants, written and illustrated by Rowboat Watkins – 14 votes

Thumbnail Books That Drive Kids Crazy: Did You Take the B from my _ook?, written and illustrated by Beck and Matt Stanton – 11 votes

Thumbnail This Book Will Not be Fun by Cirocco Dunlap; illustrated by Olivier Tallec – 10 votes

Thumbnail Poor Louie, written and illustrated by Tony Fucile – 7 votes

3rd-4th grade

Thumbnail 50 Wacky Things Animals Do by Tricia Martineau Wagner; illustrated by Carles Ballesteros – 18 votes

Thumbnail Thunder Underground by Jane Yolen; illustrated by Josee Masse – 10 votes 

Thumbnail Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets by Kwame Alexander; illustrated by Ekua Holmes – 7 votes 

Thumbnail Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History by Walter Dean Myers; illustrated by Floyd Cooper – 6 votes 

Thumbnail Manjhi Moves a Mountain by Nancy Churnin; illustrated by Danny Popovici – 3 votes

5th-6th grade

Thumbnail Malala by Raphaelle Frier; illustrated by Aurelia Fronty – 18 votes 

Thumbnail The Losers Club by Andrew Clements –14 votes

Thumbnail This is Just a Test by Wendy Wan-Long Shang and Madelyn Rosenberg – 3 votes

Thumbnail Finding Mighty by Sheela Chari – 1 vote

Thumbnail Disaster Diaries: Spiders! by R. McGeddon – 0 votes

ICPL’s votes have now been officially submitted to Every Child a Reader, the organization that administers the Children’s Choice Award as well as other national literacy initiatives. When the winners are announced on May 7, ICPL’s patrons will have had a hand in selecting them!

The good news is, it’s not too late to vote! Individual kids can vote up to May 6 (instantly and without entering any personal information) by visiting http://everychildareader.net/choice/.

 

Kids: Vote at ICPL for the 2018 Children’s Choice Book Award!

by Anne Wilmoth on March 2nd, 2018

Kids, here’s your chance to make your voice heard at the ballot box: vote for the Children’s Choice Award in the ICPL Children’s Department throughout the month of March!

The Children’s Choice Award is the only national book award given only by children and teens. There are five books nominated (also chosen by kids in school libraries around the country) in each of three age group categories: kindergarten to second grade, third to fourth grade, and fifth to sixth grade.

Visit our voting booth and fill out the secret ballot for your age group category. The winners will be announced when voting ends everywhere on May 6!

For a full list of this year’s nominees, click here.

Kids can also vote online (instantly and without entering any personal information) by visiting http://everychildareader.net/vote/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ICPL Top Staff Picks for 2017: Children’s Books

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 25th, 2017

“When you read a book as a child, it becomes a part of your identity in a way that no other reading in your whole life does.” — Kathleen Kelly, You’ve Got Mail

We salute all the amazing children’s book writers and illustrators who enrich our lives with their stories. Today, we share with you the children’s book titles that grabbed our attention — and imaginations — in 2017.

  • Pup and Bear by Kate Banks
  • A Christmas for Bear by Bonny Becker
  • See You in the Cosmos by Jack Cheng
  • Grand Canyon by Jason Chin
  • City Moon by Rachael Cole
  • Big Cat Little Cat by Elisha Cooper
  • The Wearle (Erth Dragons No. 1) by Chris d’Lacey
  • Windows by Julia Denos
  • Her Right Foot by Dave Eggers
  • Baabwaa and Wooliam: A Tale of Literacy, Dental Hygiene, and Friendship by David Elliott
  • Maya Lin: Artist-Architect of Light and Lines by Jeanne Walker Harvey
  • Here We Are: Notes For Living On Planet Earth by Oliver Jeffers
  • A Greyhound, A Groundhog by Emily Jenkins
  • Blue Sky White Stars by Sarvinder Naberhaus
  • A Small Thing … but Big by Tony Johnston
  • Binny Bewitched by Hilary McKay
  • We’re All Wonders by R.J. Palacio
  • Full of Fall by April Pulley Sayre
  • Charlie & Mouse by Laurel Snyder
  • Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk

Why I Love Kim Krans

by Casey Maynard on September 14th, 2017

For those of you who are unfamiliar with author/illustrator, Kim Krans, I highly recommend her picture books. Not only are they stunning, but her work is highly original and full of whimsy. Both ABC Dream and 123 Dream are wordless, however, Krans uses the format to allow audiences to explore her artwork and discover all the ways her choices align with the numbers and letters represented. They are also a challenge to see how much you and your little ones know about your numbers and letters.

Her most recent picture book, Whose Moon is That? differs from the Dream series in that it’s a short narrative conversation regarding ownership of the moon. The story is sweet, insightful and will get your little ones excited about looking up at our night sky. Image result for kim krans

 

Looking for more fabulous Kim Krans artwork? She is also the creator of the highly acclaimed Wild Unknown Tarot.

Learn How to Build a Better World

by Morgan Reeves on June 9th, 2017
Learn How to Build a Better World Cover Image

In conjunction with this year’s summer reading program, “Build a Better World,” read about ways people have made the world a better place, how you can help right now, and the possibilities of the future.

Since witnessing the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, J. J. Keki has been working with his neighbors of different religions to coexist peacefully and grow coffee together. By focusing on what unites them, instead of what divides them, this village has created an example of religious tolerance and harmony for the world. Read about it in Growing Peace by Richard Sobol.

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2017 Book Madness: Time to vote for the Sweet Sixteen

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on March 13th, 2017

The Book Madness brackets have been updated to show titles advancing to the Second Round.

2017 BOOK MADNESS – CHILDREN’S BRACKET

Banned Books

  • Drama by Raina Telgemeier
  • The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman
  • A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle
  • The Giver by Lois Lowry
  • A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein
  • Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
  • Yertle the Turtle by Dr. Seuss
  • Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George

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ICPL’s 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten Celebrates One Year

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on January 30th, 2017

The Iowa City Public Library will celebrate the first year of its 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program during a special storytime Saturday, February 11, at 10:30 a.m. in the Storytime Room.img_0110

1,000 Books Before Kindergarten encourages parents and caregivers to read 1,000 books to children before they start kindergarten. In doing so, they strengthen a child’s language skills and build their vocabulary — two important tools for beginning readers.

The Library launched the program in February of 2016. Join us as we celebrate our first birthday, as well as the children who reached their 1,000 Books goal. These participants will receive a special certificate to celebrate their “graduation.” We’ll also kickoff our second year of the program, so be sure to stop by, sign up and have some cake, too.

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ICPL Staff Top Picks for 2016: Children’s

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 25th, 2016

“There is no such thing as a child who hates to read; there are only children who have not found the right book.” — Frank Serafini

If your child is searching for their favorite book, or looking for a new title to add to a growing list of beloved stories, check out our favorite children’s books of 2016.

ICPL’s BEST CHILDREN’S BOOKS OF 2016childrens-room

  • Thunder Boy Jr by Sherman Alexie
  • The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill
  • Have You Seen Elephant by David Barrow
  • Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty
  • Eek! Halloween! by Sandra Boynton
  • The Wild Robot by Peter Brown
  • The Goblin’s Puzzle by Andrew S. Chilton
  • Spot, the Cat by Henry Cole
  • Raymie Nightingale by Kate DiCamillo
  • Dragon Was Terrible by Kelly DiPucchio
  • Together by Emma Dodd
  • The Night Gardener by Terry and Eric Fan
  • Bear & Hare — Where’s Bear? By Emily Gravett
  • The Darkest Dark by Chris Hadfield
  • Hotel Bruce by Ryan T. Higgins
  • Flora and the Peacocks by Molly Idle
  • We Found a Hat by Jon Klassen
  • I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark by Debbie Levy
  • The Bear and the Piano by David Litchfield
  • Furthermore by Tahereh Mafi
  • Grumpy Pants by Claire Messer
  • Pax by Sara Pennypacker
  • They All Saw a Cat by Brenden Wenzel
  • Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk
  • Little Red by Bethan Woollvin

Thanks for giving- Kids books that inspire giving

by Angela Pilkington on November 22nd, 2016

As parents, we tirelessly work to instill a sense of gratitude within our children and in today’s culture of more and better, it’s easy to overlook the many small blessings in our everyday. So as we turn our attention on giving thanks this week, let us not forget the power and importance of expressing gratitude all year long. Children’s books are fantastic resources when talking to kids about the importance of giving. Whether we choose to incorporate books about generosity into our daily reading rotation, or serve others as way of giving thanks, let’s continue inspiring grateful young hearts at home today and every day and in every way. Here are a few books to get you started.

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein

If you’re looking for a children’s book that teaches generosity or unselfishness, most people will point you right to The Giving Tree, Shel Silverstein’s lovely story of a tree that will do anything for the boy it loves — and for good reason. This classic is always a good place to start.

An Awesome Book of Thanks! by Dallas Clayton

A delightfully quirky list of things we ought to be thankful for, from the simple to the extraordinary. It teaches children how beautiful life can be when we give thanks. Your child will love the whimsical childlike artwork of magical unicorns, robotic dinosaurs, aerobic alligators combined with heartwarming prose is sure to make this book a family favorite.

It’s Mine! by Leo Lionni

Lionni is the master of picture books with simple, inspiring messages that never feel preachy. And a lesson on sharing is the first one kids need on their way to generosity. In this one, three selfish frogs spend their days arguing with the same refrain: “It’s mine!” T
hen a bad storm (and a big brown toad) teach them that sharing is indeed more rewarding than trying to lay claim to everything for ourselves.

The Gift of Nothing by Patrick McDonnell

 Mooch the cat decides to give his pal Earl the gift of nothing. But there’s an important message in this picture book about knowing how to recognize when you have enough — and Earl, in fact, has everything he needs. Turns out a gift of nothing — save friendship — is just right, and often giving our friendship is everything.

Look and Be Grateful by Tomie dePaola

A young boy awakens with the dawn, opens his eyes and looks closely at his world. He admires all that surrounds him, large and small, from the radiant sun to a tiny, but exquisite ladybug. “Today is today, and it is a gift.” We are encouraged to be thankful and to express gratitude for each unique day.

We could add several more to this list, what are some of your favorite books about being grateful?