Posts Tagged ‘Children’s Literature’


Votes Are In for the 2018 Children’s Choice Award!

by Anne Wilmoth on April 2nd, 2018

Throughout the month of March, ICPL’s young patrons in kindergarten through 6th grade cast their votes for the 2018 Children’s Choice Award. 

The Children’s Choice Award is the only national literary award given completely by children – children in select schools across the country choose the finalists in preliminary voting, after which all kids are invited to make their voice heard in selecting the best book for children published during the previous year.

143 votes were cast, and the winners, in each age category, were tabulated today. The breakdown:

K-2nd grade 

Thumbnail Billy Bloo is Stuck in Goo by Jennifer Hamburg; illustrated by Ross Burach – 14 votes

Thumbnail Pete With No Pants, written and illustrated by Rowboat Watkins – 14 votes

Thumbnail Books That Drive Kids Crazy: Did You Take the B from my _ook?, written and illustrated by Beck and Matt Stanton – 11 votes

Thumbnail This Book Will Not be Fun by Cirocco Dunlap; illustrated by Olivier Tallec – 10 votes

Thumbnail Poor Louie, written and illustrated by Tony Fucile – 7 votes

3rd-4th grade

Thumbnail 50 Wacky Things Animals Do by Tricia Martineau Wagner; illustrated by Carles Ballesteros – 18 votes

Thumbnail Thunder Underground by Jane Yolen; illustrated by Josee Masse – 10 votes 

Thumbnail Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets by Kwame Alexander; illustrated by Ekua Holmes – 7 votes 

Thumbnail Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History by Walter Dean Myers; illustrated by Floyd Cooper – 6 votes 

Thumbnail Manjhi Moves a Mountain by Nancy Churnin; illustrated by Danny Popovici – 3 votes

5th-6th grade

Thumbnail Malala by Raphaelle Frier; illustrated by Aurelia Fronty – 18 votes 

Thumbnail The Losers Club by Andrew Clements –14 votes

Thumbnail This is Just a Test by Wendy Wan-Long Shang and Madelyn Rosenberg – 3 votes

Thumbnail Finding Mighty by Sheela Chari – 1 vote

Thumbnail Disaster Diaries: Spiders! by R. McGeddon – 0 votes

ICPL’s votes have now been officially submitted to Every Child a Reader, the organization that administers the Children’s Choice Award as well as other national literacy initiatives. When the winners are announced on May 7, ICPL’s patrons will have had a hand in selecting them!

The good news is, it’s not too late to vote! Individual kids can vote up to May 6 (instantly and without entering any personal information) by visiting http://everychildareader.net/choice/.

 

Kids: Vote at ICPL for the 2018 Children’s Choice Book Award!

by Anne Wilmoth on March 2nd, 2018

Kids, here’s your chance to make your voice heard at the ballot box: vote for the Children’s Choice Award in the ICPL Children’s Department throughout the month of March!

The Children’s Choice Award is the only national book award given only by children and teens. There are five books nominated (also chosen by kids in school libraries around the country) in each of three age group categories: kindergarten to second grade, third to fourth grade, and fifth to sixth grade.

Visit our voting booth and fill out the secret ballot for your age group category. The winners will be announced when voting ends everywhere on May 6!

For a full list of this year’s nominees, click here.

Kids can also vote online (instantly and without entering any personal information) by visiting http://everychildareader.net/vote/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family Traveling for the Holidays? Bring Along an Audiobook!

by Anne Wilmoth on November 8th, 2017

Each year, while traveling literally over the river and through the woods to southeastern Michigan for Thanksgiving, I’m determined that the family unity and togetherness will start the moment we back out of the driveway. Translation: no screens, kids. Instead, I cue up an audiobook I’ve carefully selected for family listening pleasure. It can be a challenge to find something that everyone is engaged by – but when I do, it makes the miles zip by. Some we’ve enjoyed recently:

Thumbnail The Crossover by Kwame Alexander, 2014

This was a hit with everyone in the car – my 55-year-old mother-in-law, my husband, my “tween” daughter and my 6-year-old. It moves fast, and it’s written in verse – who doesn’t enjoy listening to poetry read aloud? Those who are into sports will enjoy it, as it’s about a pair of basketball-star twins and their exploits on the court, but it has plenty for the non-sports-fan as well – it’s just as much about family relationships, loyalty, and coming-of-age.

 

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Wonder by R.J. Palacio, 2012

This book about a fifth-grader with a facial abnormality is an excellent bridge to a family discussion about inclusion and kindness. The life of the protagonist has been shaped by the reactions of others to his striking physical differences, despite being a totally “regular kid” on the inside, and now he’s about to start at a new middle school. Different actors narrate the sections of this book, which are told from the perspective of a variety of characters. The dialogue and situations feel very authentic, and the message hits home without being heavy-handed or precious. You’ll be ready to see the screen adaptation that comes out this month!

 

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When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead, 2009

A one-of-a-kind historical sci-fi/mystery so suspenseful that you won’t want to press pause at a rest stop! Miranda tries to unravel who – or what – is behind the prophetic notes that keep appearing in her personal items. Other mysterious characters and unexplained events pop up, and there seems to be no earthly way all these intriguing but disparate elements could possibly be tied together by the end – but they are. Also, time travel, if you’re into that.

 

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Ghost by Jason Reynolds, 2016

Ghost is a gifted sprinter, and when he impulsively tries out for a local track team, a tough-love coach sees potential in him. But Ghost has to learn to control his anger to become a team player and succeed on the track. The audiobook is engagingly narrated by the author, who brings laugh-out-loud personality to the coach’s dialogue. This book was recently named the 2018 All Iowa Kids Read selection, so listening to it would be a great way for all your kids to participate at once.

 

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Full of Beans by Jennifer L. Holm, 2016

10-year-old Beans Curry cooks up schemes and gets into scrapes during one summer in Depression-era Key West. Adults will be fascinated by the historical details of how Key West was deliberately remade from an isolated and impoverished island community into a hot tourist attraction – this novel is based on true events – while kids will thrill to Beans’ wacky adventures and wonder what he’ll do next. Narrated by the author, fans of Holm’s popular Babymouse series will not be disappointed in this listening experience.

 

These audiobooks are available on CD at the library, or in digital, downloadable format via OverDrive. Happy listening, and happy, harmonious traveling this season!

 

And the Award Goes To….

by Angela Pilkington on January 25th, 2017

This is the season for awards. The Grammys, the Oscars, but most thrilling of all, the ALA YMAs. What is that you ask? They are American Library Association Youth Media Awards, and they were announced this past Monday.

The oldest of these awards are the John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature and the Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children.

I am always excited to learn who wins the Coretta Scott King, Robert F. Sibert and Theodor Geisel awards, too.

The 2017 Newbery winner is The Girl Who Drank the Moon, by Kelly Barnhill. Is about Luna, whose magical
abilities are emerging, who was raised in the forest by a witch, a swamp monster, and a dragon, but when a young man from the Protectorate is determined to kill the witch, Luna must use her magic to protect her family.

 

Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat,” illustrated and written by Javaka Steptoe is the 2017 Caldecott Medal winner and also the winner of the 2017 Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award.   The book presents the life of the artist, who was inspired as a child by a book of anatomy given to him by his mother after being injured in a car crash.

 

The 2017 Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award for New Talent affirms new talent and offers visibility for excellence in writing and/or illustration at the beginning of a career as a published African-American creator of children’s books.  This year’s winner is Nicola Yoon for “The Sun Is Also a Star”.  Is about Natasha, whose family is hours away from being deported, and Daniel, a first generation Korean American who strives to live up to his parents’ expectations, unexpectedly fall in love and must determine which path they will choose in order to be together.

The complete list of winners and honorees is available here. Take a look to see which of these honored books you might enjoy sharing with your children.