Library Catalog Ask a Librarian Book a Meeting Room
Catalog Your Account Menu

Posts Tagged ‘Crafts’

Craft from home with ICPL! (Part 2)

by Melody Dworak on September 30th, 2015

Part 2: e-magazines on Zinio

Yarn bombing a car

A yarn-bombed car in Alicante, Spain. Source: Wikipedia.

Today I wanted to focus exclusively on the craft magazines we have on our digital magazine portal Zinio. Like yesterday’s post about crafty e-books on Digital Johnson County, you can find what e-magazines we have through our catalog, as well. You follow the same steps as finding only the e-books as you do for e-magazines. But instead of selecting “Adult EBOOK” under Format, you choose “EMAGAZINE.”

Read our Zinio Digital Magazines introduction and connect to the service with your library card number and password. You might also consider reading my how-to blog post introducing the new Zinio app in April 2015.

What crafting magazines do we offer? Here is the current list: Read the rest of this entry »

Craft from home with ICPL! (Part 1)

by Melody Dworak on September 29th, 2015
"Mr. Whiskers and his knitting needle" from MonotonousG on DeviantArt.

“Mr. Whiskers and his knitting needle” from MonotonousG on DeviantArt.

Love to knit, sew, or quilt? We have books for you! In addition to the great recommendations from Library Director Susan Craig, I wanted to share my own ways to find crafting books and magazines—ones you can check out from the comfort of your own home.

Part 1: e-books on Digital Johnson County (OverDrive)

If you are used to searching our catalog on a computer, you can always start there. Type in your craft of choice, then go to the left-hand side and select “Adult EBOOK” under the Format heading.

Once you are there, you can click the “Check out with OverDrive” button. If your library account is up to date and you know your password, you can log in and be on your way! If you haven’t updated your address with us in a while or have more than $10 in fines, you may get an error message.

You can also go directly to the Digital Johnson County website to browse around that way. To get all the craft books we have on OverDrive, you’ll want to do an Advanced Search, and change the drop-down menu that says “All Subjects” to “Crafts”. For some reason, you can’t get to the Crafts subject from the red box area where you might be used to looking around. You can type in “crafts” into the general search, too, but not all of the books that show up will be relevant. You’ll have a better time searching for the specific craft (knitting, crochet, etc.) in that simple search box.</p?

And keep the 4th Annual ICPL Arts and Crafts Bazaar in mind while you work on your projects. If you have something special enough to donate, this ICPL fundraiser is on Saturday, December 5, 2015, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and donations will be accepted through Friday, December 4.

Stay tuned for Part 2 tomorrow–Craft magazines on Zinio!

Be Creative — We can Help!

by Susan Craig on September 25th, 2015
Be Creative — We can Help! Cover Image

It’s that time of the year again… time to be creative and make some items to donate to the Iowa City Public Library Friends Foundation’s Arts & Crafts Bazaar which will be held this year on Saturday, December 5.

The Library has many books to help spark your imagination or give you tips on how to improve your crafting skills.  I currently have three checked out that I found on the NEW nonfiction book shelves on the second floor.

Learn to Sew with Lauren by Lauren Guthrie has lots of cute projects that start out “easy peasy” and work up to “more tricky”.  The language is understandable, the illustrations really show each step in a clear way.  I think using patterns can be intimidating to beginning sewers and the chapter on using patterns is very good and also explains how to copy patterns using dressmakers’ pattern paper — a must when using the full size patterns in the book!

present perfectPresent Perfect:  25 gifts to sew & bestow by Betz White is full of fun projects that would appeal to many shoppers at the bazaar.  Tagalong Teddy, Kinetic Felt Baby Mobile, and Hexie the Turtle Floor Pillow all look like things I could handle.

all things quiltingFor beginning quilters All Things Quilting by Alex Anderson covers all the bases — from selecting fabric to the actual quilting.  As a person trying to learn more about quilting techniques I appreciate the clear illustrations showing how to align different shaped pieces (having struggled with this on a couple of projects!).

Maybe sewing isn’t your thing — if you prefer working with yarn, or wood, or paper, or beads, or metal, or any other medium, the Library has books for you.  Check out a few and be creative.

P.S. One of my favorite things about our bazaar is that for every $10 you spend you get chance to win one of 8-10 door prizes, which are — you guessed it! — books, that represent the many ways people can be creative.


A basket full of memories

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on June 2nd, 2015

There’s a woven basket in my living room that it a catch-all for all the things that don’t have a set destination: magazines, mail, papers I’ll get to eventually. basket

The basket was purchased at The City Market in Kansas City nearly 15 years ago. When we bought it, it was to hold our son’s building blocks (though we still tripped over them more often than not). Over the years, its uses have ranged from toy storage to cat bed to the-kitchen-table-is-covered-with-stuff-so-use-the-basket.

I love this basket. It has survived four moves, three cats and two toddlers. There’s not a lot of furniture in my house that can make that claim.

Farmers markets are great places to find items like baskets, benches and trunks that you didn’t know you needed until you see it. I love that such finds are crafted by local artisans because no matter how many craft books I check out from the Library, the only things I can make without throwing a minor temper tantrum is a bookmark.

(This is not an exaggeration. I took a knitting class almost two years ago and the scarf I started it still on the needles because I ran out of yarn and didn’t know what to do next.)

What’s your favorite non-food farmers market find?


March is National Craft Month

by Beth Fisher on March 12th, 2014
March is National Craft Month Cover Image

National Craft Month What a GREAT idea!  A whole month dedicated to crafts of all kinds.

On the 2nd floor there Craft Month display with books on all sorts of crafts:  ceramics, jewelry making, felting, embroidery, stained glass making, metalwork, glass blowing, quilling, miniature making, tatting, photography, and weaving, in addition to the more common knitting, crocheting and quilting books.

Another place to check for crafting books is the New Book Shelves on the 2nd floor.   Here are a few of the new books I found on the shelf today:

The Crafter’s Book of Clever Ideas (pictured above) by Andrea Currie and Cliff Currie. If I’d been the editor, I’d have called this book “He Did/She Did.”  It’s hard to describe this book.  There are 25 crafts, but 50 projects.  Each craft has a “her” version and a “his” version. The same supplies and concepts are used to make two similar yet different projects.  None are really high tech. You might not even need to buy any supplies.  Some projects are kitschy, others are cute.  With simple instructions illustrated by color photos, none of the projects looks overly complicated.  As I flipped through this book I found myself thinking that it would be a great book for a crafty evening with friends or kids.

precut patchwork partyPrecut Patchwork Party by Elaine Schmidt.  All of the projects in this book involve some form of patchwork or quilting, but none of them are actually quilts.   Schmidt has created 18 fun projects that take advantage of precuts.*  Fabric baskets, purses, aprons, and potholders, there’s something here for anyone.

Schmidt knows her stuff.  The book begins with 18 pages of “Basics” will lead you through everything you’ll need to know about precuts, supplies, tools and basic techniques.  She’s broken the projects down into two sections:  Home Decor Projects and Accessories, Wear-ables, and Gifts.   Well written, easy to follow, step by step instructions are provided for each project along with bright color photographs.  None of the projects are very complicated, and a beginner could probably tackle most of them with no problem.  That’s not to say advanced sewists or quilters wouldn’t find something fun to make here too.     *Precuts are packets of coordinating fabric that are available in specific sizes, from 5.5″ squares to rolls of 2.5″ strips.  One of the best things about precuts is because the fabrics are all from one line they automatically all go together.

instacraftInstacraft: fun & simple pojects for adorable gifts, deco & more by Allison Caporimo with photographs by Meera Lee Patel.    The title of this book is perfect.  Each of the 50+ projects included are fun, quick and mostly use things you already have around the house.  The book is fun to flip through.  Each 2-page spread is one project, with a great closeup of the finished project, a list of supplies you’ll need and simple step by step instructions.  The author also includes an “extra” in each project.. be it a tip, listening suggestion, a recipe to try while waiting for something to dry, or other entertaining tidbit.  It gives the book a fun twist not found in most craft books.   Most of the crafts would be great to do with younger kids, or for older kids to do with supervision (spray paint and glue …) and many of them use recycled items. Definitely a great new choice for the ICPL craft collection.