Posts Tagged ‘Displays’


Weber Days Book Display–Read Like It’s 1897

by Heidi Lauritzen on May 6th, 2018

A fun piece of Iowa City history lives in our Library’s archives:  the accession books that show the book purchases that the Library made in its early years. The Iowa City Public Library opened on January 21, 1897, and the first 1,050 entries in the first accession book were recorded on January 14, 15, and 16, 1897.  The best part is, we still circulate some of those original titles.

A book display on the first floor gathers together a sampling of the more than one hundred titles that you can still find at ICPL.  Many of the titles are what we call “classic fiction”, and you can probably guess some of the authors represented:  Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Bronte, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Jonathan Swift, William Thackeray, Jules Verne, and William Shakespeare.

There’s a sprinkling of children’s fiction as well: Black Beauty by Anna Sewell, The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling, Little Women and Little Men by Louisa May Alcott, and  Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll to name just a few.

A few entries in the accession book particularly caught my eye: Looking Backward, 2000-1887 by Edward Bellamy (first published in 1888—when the year 2000 must have seemed impossibly far away, and is now in our past); and Confessions of an English Opium-Eater by Thomas De Quincey (still a timely issue, alas). In the publishing norms of the time, the author entry in our accession book for Cranford is written as “Mrs. Gaskell”.  Our catalog today does give the author her full name, Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell.

With poetry, we do not have an exact match in title in many cases, but we still provide collections from authors represented in the Library’s opening day collection. Elizabeth Barrett Browning, John Keats, Henry Longfellow, Alexander Pope, Alfred Tennyson, and William Wordsworth continue to be found at ICPL.

Kick off our month of Weber Days activities by reading a classic book that’s been in circulation in Iowa City for 120 years! And for a full listing of Weber Days events at the Library, look here.

Welcome, Cities of Literature!

by Stacey McKim on March 30th, 2018

Representatives from the global Cities of Literature will be in town next week for their annual meeting.  While only one event is open to the public (a panel discussion about the cities’ innovative programs on Thursday, April 5 from 5:15-6:00 at Hancher Auditorium), we’re pretty excited about the chance to think about these twenty-eight cities with rich literary cultures.

Check out a book written by someone from another City of Literature off our display.  We have books by writers from most of the cities, including Durban (South Africa), Reykjavik (Iceland), Krakow (Poland), Lviv (Ukraine), and many more.

While you’re at it, learn a little bit about why each city qualified from the nearby map.  For instance, did you know that Cole’s Book Arcade in Melbourne was reputed to be the largest bookshop in the world at the turn of the twentieth century with two million books, and attracted the attention of visitors like Mark Twain?  How about the fact that Norwich was home to the first female to write and publish a book in the English language?  Or that a Krakow bookstore has been continuously in operation at the same address since 1610?

The Edinburgh City of Literature website has excellent information about each city, if you want to learn more.

Party Like ‘Tis 999

by Heidi Lauritzen on January 5th, 2018

There’s a great display on the second floor, next to the Information Desk.  Maeve has gathered books and DVDs on the Middle Ages from our nonfiction collection, and placed them under a showcase of objects reflecting medieval times.

The “Middle Ages” and the “Medieval Period” often are used interchangeably, and cover roughly the 5th to 15th centuries.  Among other things in the showcase, look for the silver coronet, a dagger, and a pewter spoon.

Walk down almost any aisle in the nonfiction collection, and you can find something of medieval interest:  religion, fashion, art, literature, travel, history, and biography are all represented in the display.  Some of the materials that caught my eye are: The Medieval World:  An Illustrated Atlas, full of colorful illustrations and arranged chronologically; Medieval Dress & Fashion by Margaret Scott and published by the British Library; Life in the Medieval Cloister by Julie Kerr; the DVD Medieval Siege (“catapult yourself into the chaos of medieval battle”); and The Bayeux Tapestry: the Complete Tapestry in Color

All the materials on the display kiosk are available for checkout.  Time travel back a millennium or so, and find out how to party like ’tis 999.

Recovering the Classics exhibit ends

by Stacey McKim on December 6th, 2016

Our exhibit of redesigned book covers has come to a close, and we hope you enjoyed it!

If you contributed one of the beautiful and thoughtful original designs, you may now retrieve your piece from the Help Desk.  Thank you for participating!

The centerpiece of the exhibit was this year’s Art Purchase Prize winner.  This beautiful redesign of The Oregon Trail by Francis Parkman was made by local artist Doran Pearson and is almost ready for 8-week checkouts.  See if it’s available or place a hold.

And finally, if you were inspired to make your own design too late, you can always submit a book cover to the online Recovering the Classics project.recovering1

Signed, Sealed, Published: Epistolary Novels

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on July 13th, 2016

pop up displayReceiving a letter in the mail was a big deal when I was a child. It didn’t happen often, so the days I’d come home from school and find an envelope with my name sitting on the kitchen table were treasured. I’d rip it open and start reading before taking off my coat, devouring the words the sender shared with me.

I think it’s my love for mail that launched my love of epistolary novels – books written as a series of documents, such as letters and journal entries. There’s something real about these stories because the reader instantly becomes part of the character’s personal life. Then again, there’s also a thrill that comes from reading another person’s journal – even if they are fictional.

You can check out some of my favorite epistolary novels on the new pop-up display on the Library’s first floor, located near the Help Desk. Choices include everything from young adult fiction, such as The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chboksky, to fiction titles, including Attachments: A Novel by Rainbow Rowell.

Read the rest of this entry »

Eye candy on the 2nd floor

by Stacey McKim on March 30th, 2016

3ddesign_2

Have you seen the current display on the second floor of the library?  The amazing variety of lamps, vases, trays, interior design plans, and other items of functional design were made by tank2Professor Monica Correia and her 3D design students at the University of Iowa.  Everything is breathtaking, but the 3D printed tank that stores rubber bands is funny, too.  If one of the items inspires the maker in you, a selection of design books are on display nearby.

This 3D design exhibit is here until mid-April to coordinate with Monica Correia’s Mission Creek talk on Saturday, April 9 at 1:00pm in the Iowa City Public Library.  Her lecture is titled “Digital Technology in the Process of Making Design to Connect” and admission is free.

Other upcoming community displays include the Awesome Autism Awareness and Acceptance Art Project (April 19-May 15), resources for Sexual Violence Awareness Month (RVAP, April 1-21), and a promotion of the Festival of Flowers (United Action for Youth, April 25 – May 25).  And I hope you caught the impressive exhibit of UI Scottish Highlanders memorabilia last month!

If your group would like to have a display at the Iowa City Public Library, please contact me at stacey-mckim@icpl.org or (319) 887-6025.  Display guidelines can be found at http://www.icpl.org/displays.

We Give Thanks For Music

by Angela Pilkington on November 9th, 2015

The Iowa City Public Library is pleased to welcome The Rita Benton Music Library’s exhibit, “We Give Thanks for Music: an A-Z list” to the library this November.

The fantastic display with all of the 26 musical concepts is located in the large display case outside of the Children’s Room at the Iowa City Public Library, 123. S. Linn St. The display fits in well with ICPL’s nine month initiative, Music is The Word, which aims to offer music-related programming initiated by the Iowa City Public Library, in partnership with other Iowa City entities, to welcome and introduce the University of Iowa School of Music to downtown Iowa City. Weekly programming will run from September 2015 through May 2016 at the library, unless noted otherwise. The focus will be all things musical and will include performance events for all ages and tastes, as well as non-performance, music related programs, displays and exhibits.

Katie Buehner, Head of UI Music Library says it was hard to pick just one or two reasons to be thankful for music, so they chose 26 musical concepts, instruments, styles, genres, and ensembles (one for each letter of the alphabet) to represent a portion of what makes music great.

“I wanted to share a little bit of everything from our collection – books, scores, recordings – but with some local flavor sprinkled throughout. Several objects highlight the School of Music’s history, and the exhibit contains sheet music selections that hail from Cedar Rapids and radio station WHO.”
There are several items with strong ties to Iowa City and the University of Iowa’s School of Music, including recordings by jazz ensemble Johnson County Landmark, an opera by Iowa professors Philip Bezanson and Paul Engle, and some locally produced vinyl records. Several items from the Music Library’s rare book and score collection are highlighted, as well as early 20th song collections from WHO in Des Moines and ukulele clubs in Cedar Rapids.

This is an exciting year for the Music Library because in just nine months, the University of Iowa Music Library will move into the new Voxman Music Building on the corner of Burlington and Clinton in downtown Iowa City.

To see a list and full detail of all the display concepts visit their website at: http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/exhibit-givethanksformusic and for an up-to-date look at the ICPL’s Music is the Word events, visit our online calendar at:  http://www.icpl.org/mitw .

African American music exhibit

by Stacey McKim on August 20th, 2015

BehindTheBeat_500pxJust in time for the Soul Fest next week, check out our Behind the Beat exhibit near the magazine area on the first floor.  On loan from the African American Museum of Iowa, the display explores the development of African American music from its roots in Africa to modern-day hip hop.

Want more on this topic?  I recommend searching the online catalog for music history for books, or search soul music as a subject to find music CDs.

Displays @ ICPL

by Kara Logsden on April 29th, 2015
Display on the "T-Walls" at the Iowa City Public Library

Display on the “T-Walls” at the Iowa City Public Library

The Library Board recently reviewed and updated the Display Policy that governs displays members of the community host at the Library. More information about display space at the Library may be found at www.icpl.org/displays.

According to Board Policy:

The purpose of the Library’s display facilities is to fulfill the Library’s mission and increase awareness of Library resources. The Library provides display facilities for the public and Library use. Exhibits using these facilities shall further one or more of these purposes:

A. To call attention to a theme related to Library services, collections or programs.

B. To bring together Library materials from several subject areas related to a theme of current interest.

C. To highlight current issues, events or other subjects of public interest.

D. To display original art, crafts, photographs or writings created by Iowa artists or contained in traveling exhibits.

E. To explain the activities of, or issues of interest to, local organizations and agencies engaged in educational, recreational,  cultural, intellectual or charitable activities.

F. To display interesting collections or hobbies of local residents.

The next time you are in the Library, browse through the many displays at the Library. They are constantly changing and the information shared in informative and entertaining. If you would like to schedule a display at the Library, please call the Library at 319.356.5200 and ask to be directed to Stacey in Community and Access Services.

Iowa City Public Library honors veterans

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on October 15th, 2014

The Iowa City Public Library will host “Remembering Our Fallen,” a touring photo display honoring Iowa servicemen and servicewoman who have died from wounds suffered in a war zone since September 11, 2001.   ROF-Poster

The exhibit will be on display in the Library’s first floor gallery Nov. 1 through Nov. 8. The exhibit’s stop at the Library is supported by U.S. Bank.

“Remembering Our Fallen” was created to honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Photo exhibits exist in 18 states so that the men and woman who made the ultimate sacrifice will never be forgotten.

In addition to the exhibit, the Library will host a book reading with Miyoko Hikiji from noon to 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 5, in Meeting Room A.

Hikiji is the project director for the non-profit group Veterans National Recovery Center in Iowa and an instructor for the “Writing My Way Back Home” workshop. She served with the Iowa National Guard for nine years, and earned 14 military decorations for service. Her memoir, “All I Could Be: My Story as a Woman Warrior in Iraq,” details more than 70 missions throughout the northwest quadrant of Iraq in 2003 and 2004.

For more information, contact the Library at (319) 356-5200.