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Posts Tagged ‘dogs’


Off the Leash: A Year at the Dog Park by Matthew Gilbert

by Maeve Clark on August 29th, 2014
Off the Leash: A Year at the Dog Park by Matthew Gilbert Cover Image

I loved “Off the Leash: A Year at the Dog Park” by Matthew Gilbert.  As a former dog park person and now a neighborhood dog walker, I found myself relating to so much of what Gilbert describes in his book. Everyone knows all of the dogs’ names and we refer to owners as Jack’s mom or Nellie’s mom.  Eventually you get to know the other dog park peoples’ names and then their stories.  Gilbert’s book is his story of his first year with Toby and how Toby helps him come out of his relatively introverted shell. Toby makes him  make friendships with folks he would meet no where else but at the dog park.  Gilbert, a television critic for The Boston Globe, wasn’t even a dog person until he and his husband, Tom,  decided to get an absolutely gorgeous yellow Labrador puppy.  Gilbert worked at home and soon learned that a puppy needed exercise, a lot of exercise, so much exercise that walking on the sidewalks just wasn’t enough for a very energetic puppy.

Gilbert, (actually Toby), finds Armory Park and then the dogs and their human companions at the park.  At first he just lets Toby play and doesn’t interact with the others. But as anyone who goes to a dog park knows that if you come come to a park with a puppy others will be drawn to you like a magnet and want to talk.  And talk leads to learning everyone’s names and eventually their stories.  Gilbert aptly describes the dog park denizens, including an older gentleman, Saul,  who doesn’t have a dog anymore but loves dogs and tries so hard to connect with the dogs and their owners. One of the most poignant parts of “Off the Leash” is when Saul no longer comes to the park. Saul was in the early states of Alzheimer’s and had a minor car accident and had to move in with his brother. The dog park people track down Saul’s brother and find out that he needs more care than his brother can give and that he is moved to a retirement home.  There are other stories that tug at the heart. Stories of when a dog dies.  The dog park family rallies around the companion and brings food and tells stories and witnesses with the bereaved about the loss.

At other times “Off the Leash” is laugh out loud funny; dog people have stories to tell and if you are at a park, you have time to hear their stories.  You also learn who follows the rules, and who doesn’t, who joins in and who doesn’t, and how the dog park people use their dogs to express feelings they would never normally share with Nellie benchanyone else. Gilbert calls this sharing dog ventriloquism.

If  you have a dog or had a dog or want a dog, you will enjoy “Off the Leash”.  Your dog might too, Nellie did, I read numerous passages to her.  She did not pass judgment, she is a dog, I did, I am am a dog park person.

Who was Klondike Bill?

by Maeve Clark on May 17th, 2014

The Iowa City Puklondike bill3blic Library just added a fantastic new collection to the Digital History Project. Post Cards from Early Iowa City is a collection of 94 postcards from Bob Hibbs, one of Iowa City’s citizen historians.  One of my favorite postcards from the collection is from 1910 and is of Klondike Bill and his team of eight dogs and a cart in front of the Pentacrest.  Why was Klondike Bill in Iowa City with a team of dogs and where were they going?

I immediately googled Klondike Bill and found several of the Iowa City cards for sale on eBay, one for $99.  The next hit was to a book by Iowa City author, Lyell Henry,  Was This Heaven: A Self-Portrait of Iowa on Early Postcard. Henry writes that “When Klondike Bill, a colorful transcontinental itinerant, and his dog team reached Iowa City, a photographer snapped them standing next to the University of Iowa campus.”  Well that was a start.  I continued my search and found other postcards of Klondike Bill in other cities.  One in Ortonville, Minnesota and another at the McKinley Monument in Colorado and another in Sioux Falls, South Dakota all with his team of dogs and a cart.

The next step of my search tklondike bill 2ook me to newspapers of that time period.  There were many stories of Klondike Bill passing through towns on his way east, but few with specifics.  One article in the Escanaba Daily Press from January 12, 1912 in what must have been a wire story, tells of Klondike Bill arriving in Chicago on January 11, 1912 “with a combination of wagon and sleigh and seven dogs traveling from Nome, Alaska to Washington, D.C., on a wager… “Klondike Bill” refused to tell much of his trip, but said he would win considerable money if he reached the capital by a certain date, and added that he was several days ahead of his schedule.  Another article from the El Paso Herald  from January 26, 1912 sheds more light on Klondike Bill.  We  see Klondike Bill with what looks to be a very unhappy dog and learn that his name was William Buchanan and that the wager was for $100,000.00, a mighty sum for 1912. Also included is a photograph of his possible fiance, Miss Rose Maegerin.

But there the trail grew cold, at least for now.




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