Posts Tagged ‘Farmer’s Market’


What’s the Bookmobile doing at the Farmer’s Market??

by Shawna Riggins on April 29th, 2017

When you visit the Iowa City Saturday Farmer’s Market this year you may notice one large new participant – Our brand new Bookmobile! 2017-03-bookmobile-drawingOn Saturdays in May and June as you stock up on Farmer’s Market goodies be sure stop by the Iowa City Public Library Bookmobile in the Chauncey Swan lot. As a Farmer’s Market shopper and a library go-er, I am pumped about this pairing and I’ve been thinking of all the ways this could come in handy: Read the rest of this entry »

Farm to Table cookbooks

by Melody Dworak on August 12th, 2016
Farm to Table cookbooks Cover Image

Inspired by my overabundant CSA hauls (Community Supported Agriculture) and the Farm to Street dinner next Thursday, I thought I’d put together a list of “Farm to Table” cookbooks.

This is a list of fantastic books that came out within the past year or so, books that feature vegetables in all their fabulous glory. I curated this list with the easy meal in mind. Check out one of these books, pour that glass of wine, and start cooking! Read the rest of this entry »

Fall at the Farmer’s Market

by Kara Logsden on October 13th, 2015
Fall at the Farmer’s Market Cover Image

2015 DoughnutIt’s fall at the Iowa City Farmer’s Market. Pumpkins and gourds are for sale, the air is crisp, apples are fresh, and we’re starting to think about frost.

This time of year I start making my “just one more” list …

Just one more order of breakfast tacos …

Just one more cup of delicious coffee enjoyed while sitting on a curb watching people …

Just one more Farmer’s Market pie …

Just one more (well … 2 more) spring rolls for my lunch …

Just one more pint of jalapenos for Poppers …

And my favorite … Just one more CIDER DONUT … (How will I live without them?)

The good news is there are a few more weeks of Farmer’s Market remaining and time to check off the items on my “just one more” list.

When I was a child my Mom used to make homemade donuts. I remember dough fried in oil in a cast iron skilled, flipped over with a fork, drained on a paper towel and then tossed in powdered sugar. Yummy! We didn’t have donuts often, but when we did it was a treat. I’ve never made donuts for my family – crepes are our go-to weekend morning treat. The Library has a few books about donuts, though, and I may give them a try. To find these books, navigate to the Library’s catalog (catalog.icpl.org), select the SUBJECT tab, and type in DOUGHNUT. You can type in DONUT but it will refer you to the formal spelling. The book that caught my eye was A baker’s field guide to doughnuts : more than 60 warm and fresh homemade treats. 🙂

 

 

IC Farmer’s Market Harvest Storytime Recap

by Morgan Reeves on October 3rd, 2015

With a chill in the air, it was time for the last Farmer’s Market Storytime. I found a sunny spot on the Chauncey Swan Park lawn to spread my blankets for a cozy place to read. A small but dedicated group joined me as the band started playing in the opposite corner of the park. Some of us were still finishing breakfast buys from the market, so I took a moment to talk about the fall harvest and what it brings to the farmer’s market.

Then we read our first book, All for a Dime by Will Hillenbrand. This story follows three friends as they get ready to sell their wares at Market Day and shows what they get for just a dime.

Read the rest of this entry »

Flowers, Flowers Everywhere

by Shawna Riggins on September 1st, 2015

Of course I love to stock up on fresh produce at the Farmers Market, but there are many other parts of the Market that I get excited about. Lately I have been enjoying the beautiful fresh cut flowers available in several stalls. Half the fun is taking the time to build a personalized arrangement. Then you get to bring them home and admire their beauty and scent in your house all week. I love the variSunflowersety that is available at the market as well as knowing that they were grown locally and cut individually. If you don’t have a yard of blooming flowers, this is a great way to enjoy nature. Even if you do have your own yard and flowers, you may not necessarily want to cut them down. Stop by this weekend and build your own bouquet. Looking for guidance as you set out to make your extra special centerpiece? Check out some of our helpful books. Be sure to share a photo with us, we’d love to see your creations!

Jalapenos @ the IC Farmer’s Market

by Kara Logsden on August 18th, 2015

Jalapeno Poppers are a family favorite and the Iowa City Farmer’s Market is the best place to purchase fresh jalapenos this time of year. Often these morsels serve as a meal at our house. Baked Poppers can be stored in the refrigerator for a couple days (although they rarely last that long at our house) and are delicious cold as well as reheated.

Jalapeno Peppers from the Iowa City Farmer's Market

Jalapeno Peppers from the Iowa City Farmer’s Market

We have many variations of our Jalapeno Popper recipe and often the final product is contingent on what’s in the refrigerator. Crumbled crispy bacon, goat cheese, and artichoke dip can all be substituted into the basic recipe for delicious results.

One word of caution: Make sure you remove all the seeds from the jalapenos. In general, Jalapeno Poppers are only a bit “warm” – especially with the delicious cheese to cool down the palate. Forgotten seeds can surprise the person eating the popper, though, so caution is needed if consumers are wary of hot food.

Here’s our basic recipe:

Logsden Jalapeno Poppers

Select fresh, large Jalapenos.

Cut off the top and split in half lengthwise.

Remove all seeds.

Fill with cream cheese.

Wrap with Prosciutto (we prefer Iowa-made La Quercia)

Logsden Jalapeno Poppers

Logsden Jalapeno Poppers

Arrange on cooking pan.

Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes. Check after 15.

If you are looking for summer recipe inspiration, browse our catalog or check out the many awesome books at the Library. 641 is the call number to get you started.

Let us know which delicious dishes you are creating from the fresh ingredients you find at the Iowa City Farmer’s Market.

See you at the Market!

 

A Few of my Favorite Things

by Casey Maynard on August 11th, 2015

Let’s just start by saying that I love the Farmer’s Market–everything I need for a week of healthy and colorful eating I can find there and it’s a great way to support the community. Pairing this with the wonderful cooking resources at ICPL means that the ideas of new and fun things to try are endless.

My favorite thing that I can find at the market would have to be the myriad types of tomatoes.  These special little fruitables are by far one of the most versatile pieces of summer fare around. From little yellow cherries to not quite ripe greens and the large beefmasters, local farmers carry as many types of tomatoes as there are ways to use them.  From red and green salsas, to caprese salads and slow roasted cherries there are so many easy, healthy and delicious ways to use this summer bounty.  For more great ideas check out some of these books:

Summer Food: New Summer Classics, by Paul Lowe

 

Tomato: a fresh from the vine cook book, by Lawrence Davis-Hollander

 

 

The Heirloom Tomato: from garden to table, by Amy Goldman

Mystery at the Farmer’s Market

by Heidi Lauritzen on August 4th, 2015
Mystery at the Farmer’s Market Cover Image

I have been enjoying a new cookbook from the Library’s collection, and when I finally settled on a recipe to try, a trip to the Iowa City Farmer’s Market was in order.

The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook features recipes contributed by more than one hundred mystery authors.  Some of my favorites are included–Jacqueline Winspear, Charles Todd, and Louise Penny–and you will recognize so many others:  Lee Child, Sara Paretsky, Max Allan Collins and Barbara Collins, Sue Grafton, Scott Turow, and James Patterson to name a few.  In addition to the authors’ introductions to their recipes, the editor has added several other short essays, one of which answers the question “What exactly is a red herring?”

Many of the recipes are for foods served in the mysteries.  I chose Louise Penny’s “Madame Benoit’s Tourtiere,” a dish mentioned inLois Pavelka photo A Fatal Grace.  Penny’s mysteries are set in Quebec, and tourtiere is a regional dish from that province.  It is essentially a meat pie, with onion and garlic, and it provided me with a chance to visit with Lois Pavelka of Pavelka’s Point Meats to get some ground pork and beef.  Lois and her husband raise livestock on their farm north of Solon, and she is a regular at the Market with all kinds of delicious choices for pork, beef and lamb.  Their picnic bacon is especially good!

Grinnell farmer photogreen beansNext, I went to Grinnell Heritage Farm’s table to get some fresh garlic, and decided that potatoes and green beans would be good side dishes to the meat pie.

The resulting savory pie was a tasty example of comfort food, and would be a good dish to bring to a potluck or family gathering.  In her introduction to the recipe, Penny says that tourtiere can be eaten all year long, but is particularly associated with Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve celebrations.Pie photo

 

 

Food and the Midwestern landscape

by Susan Craig on July 28th, 2015

Years ago, as I got too busy with work and children to maintain a large vegetable garden and be able to pick that perfect tomato exactly when it was perfect, I put my gardening efforts into flowers (they do have that perfect moment too, but you don’t have to pick them and, hopefully, others will enjoy them if you can’t!) and started buying vegetables at Farmers’ Market. Over time I came not only to appreciate the fresh local produce, but the people who grow it. Many with a ready smile, some more taciturn, all with a connection to the Iowa soil.kitchen

I recently checked out a book at the Library that made me think of these local farmers. New Prairie Kitchen by Summer (Honest!) Miller, photographs by Dana Damewood. The subtitle of the book is, “Stories and seasonal recipes from chefs, farmers, and artisans of the Great Plains.”

The recipes are great, but the book is far more than a collection of recipes. The author has visited the people and places where the food is grown and where it is prepared, and she tells their stories. She is from Nebraska and there are more Nebraska stories than elsewhere, but Iowa is represented. The photographs — of the people, the food, and the landscape, are simply marvelous.

This is a book to savor in many ways. I can see some of my regular Farmers’ Market vendors in the next edition.

Live music @ IC Farmer’s Market

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on July 21st, 2015

The Iowa City Parks and Recreation Department and the University of Iowa Community Credit Union announced the line-up for this month’s live music at the Iowa City Farmer’s Market several weeks ago, which could make this post seem outdated, but it’s not.

Tomorrow’s Market Music performers are the Awful Purdies. If you don’t get the chance tlmpo see them perform from 5 to 7 p.m., you can check out their music through the Library’s Local Music Project.

The Local Music Project is a collection of albums by eastern Iowa musicians available for free download to your computer. We also have music by David Zollo in this collection. He performed at the market on July 8.

The musical line-up for the rest of July is as follows:

  • Wednesday, July 22: Awful Purdies
  • Saturday, July 25: Ryne Doughty
  • Wednesday, July 29: Lew Knudson

Market Music is scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays and 9 to 11 a.m. on Saturdays.