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Posts Tagged ‘Graphic Novels’


2017 Book Madness: Time to vote for the Sweet Sixteen

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on March 13th, 2017

The Book Madness brackets have been updated to show titles advancing to the Second Round.

2017 BOOK MADNESS – CHILDREN’S BRACKET

Banned Books

  • Drama by Raina Telgemeier
  • The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman
  • A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle
  • The Giver by Lois Lowry
  • A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein
  • Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
  • Yertle the Turtle by Dr. Seuss
  • Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George

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Drum Roll, Please…

by Casey Maynard on January 3rd, 2017

Image result for caldecott medal pngThe votes have been tallied with more than 100 cast for our Mock Caldecott nominees. Of the fifteen titles chosen we are naming one winner and five honor books as there was a tie for the fourth space. Without any further ado, let’s get to which titles you chose to represent ICPL’s first Mock Caldecott Award.

And the Winner is…

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ICPL Top Staff Picks for 2016: Graphic Novels

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 30th, 2016

It’s believed the term “graphic novel” was coined by Richard Kyle in an 1964 essay, though it didn’t gain popularity until the late 1970s with the publication of Will Eisner’s A Contract with God.

While some in the comics community object to the term, calling it unnecessary, few can argue against the genre’s popularity. Our graphics novel collection has grown so much, we moved it out of the nonfiction stacks and into its own shelving area on the Library’s second floor.

Our nominations for the Best Graphic Novels of the year include both children and adult titles. Children titles can be found in the Children’s Room.

ICPL’s BEST GRAPHIC NOVELS OF 2016graphic-novels

  • Adulthood is a Myth: A Sarah’s Scribbles Collection by Sarah Andersen
  • Mary Wept Over the Feet of Jesus by Chester Brown
  • Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet Book 1 by Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • Dark Night: A True Batman Story by Paul Dini
  • Breaking Cat News: Cats Reporting on the News that Matters to Cats by Georgia Dunn
  • Compass South by Hope Larson
  • March: Book Three by John Lewis
  • Snow White: A Graphic Novel by Matt Phelan
  • Lumberjanes: Volume 3 Terrible Plan by Shannon Watters, Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis and Brooke Allen
  • Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier
  • Paper Girls Vol. 1 by Brian K. Vaughn and Cliff Chang

Behold . . . The Visions!

by Dennis Cooper on December 17th, 2016
Behold . . . The Visions! Cover Image

What does it mean to be “human”?  What does it mean to be “ordinary”?  What does it mean to be a “family”?   These deep philosophical questions (and more)  are explored by the android Avenger in Marvel Comics’ Vision, v.1: Little Worse Than a Man.  Former CIA agent and current comic book rising star Tom King wrote this future classic, with refreshingly understated and stunningly subdued artwork by Spanish illustrator Gabriel Hernandez Walta. Read the rest of this entry »

Mock Caldecott Award 2016

by Casey Maynard on December 5th, 2016

This year we are trying something new at ICPL, a Mock Caldecott award.  Every year, the American Library Association awards the Randolph Caldecott Medal to a distinguished American picture book. For full eligibility requirements and criteria please visit the AlA’s Caldecott website. Also, stop by the Children’s Room to see a wonderful and informative display regarding the history of the award that Mari Redington has put together in the small display case.

Keeping eligibility requirements in mind we have put together a list of 15 possible contenders for the 2017 award. We ask that you read all of these titles before voting, or as many as you can get your hands on. When voting please pick and rank your top five titles: one winner (1) and four honor books (2-5). Paper ballots are available and are being collected at the Children’s Room Desk.  If you are unable to cast a paper ballot and are familiar with the titles, then please feel free to comment with your top five on or before December 31st.

We will be announcing the winning ICPL Caldecott titles at the beginning of 2017, shortly before the ALA midwinter meeting where they will be announcing the Medal and Honor winners.  How fun would it be if we have picked a winner or an honor book?!  Read the rest of this entry »

Fresh Picks: Graphic Novels

by Morgan Reeves on October 9th, 2016
Fresh Picks: Graphic Novels Cover Image

Formerly derided as lazy reading, these days graphic novels have come into their own and offer some of the most complex and interesting stories around. Classic comics themes of adventure and humor are still the most prevalent in the format, but nonfiction and historical fiction are gaining in popularity. Some of the newest additions to our jGraphic Novels collection showcase the format’s growing diversity. Let’s start with the sixth volume in the American history series “Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales,” Alamo All-Stars. This book covers the convoluted early history of Texas and its ties to Mexico. The historical facts are kept flowing through the funny narration of Nathan Hale and questions from his executioners. Tangential stories from the lives of Davy Crockett, Jim Bowie, and Vicente Guerrero help keep the story personal.

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Summer Reading Program check-in!

by Candice Smith on June 10th, 2016
Summer Reading Program check-in! Cover Image

I’m just a week into the 2016 Summer Reading Program, but I am happy (actually, quite pleased with myself!) to say that I’ve got four activities in the works. Doing so many at once might not be the norm, but I’m confident I’ll finish all of them soon. Here’s what I’m reading:

  1. Revival by Tim Seeley and Mike Norton. The story spans several days in Wausau, Wisconsin, where some of the town’s deceased residents come back to life. It has a dark, somewhat gothic feel to it, and it’s beautifully illustrated. This book meets activity ‘V,’ read a graphic novel or comic book
  2. The Midnight Assassin: Panic, Scandal, and the Hunt for America’s First Serial Killer by Skip Hollandsworth. Recounts a series of ghastly murders in Austin, Texas, during the 1880s. Lots of great detail, about the history of Austin, the people there, and of course, the murders. Similar to Devil in the White City. This book meets activity ‘X,’ read a book from the New Nonfiction shelves.
  3. Bone Gap by Laura Ruby. Bone Gap is a dull, small, midwestern town with some very mysterious places, if you know where and how to look. Finn and Sean are two brothers living on their own there, Finn a 17-year-old somewhat awkward kid with a couple good friends, Sean is his older brother who tries to hold down the home. When their friend Roza disappears one day, all of their worlds are turned upside-down in a multitude of ways. There’s an element of magical realism that gives a bit of a fantasy feel, but it’s a pretty serious YA book, with some violence and mature themes. This meets activity ‘T,’ read a young adult book.
  4. True Crime Addict: How I Lost Myself in the Mysterious Disappearance of Maura Murray by James Renner. I first heard of Maura Murray from the Missing Maura Murray podcast: a student at UMass who has a car accident on a dark road, tells someone she doesn’t need help because AAA is on the way, and within minutes is gone, never to be seen again. James Renner comes upon the story while looking for something to focus on after losing his job at a newspaper, and gets sucked into the mysteries that surround the case. This book meets activity ‘Z,’ read a book only during your lunch hour.

Where are you in your summer reading?? If you haven’t signed up yet, there’s still time…stop by the Library and get ready to read!

ICPL Top Picks for 2015: Graphic Novels

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on December 30th, 2015
ICPL Top Picks for 2015: Graphic Novels Cover Image

According to Publishers Weekly, graphic novels are one of the fastest-growing genres in public libraries. The reasons for this vary from academic (studies have shown the positive impact graphic novels have on reluctant readers and English-learning students) to entertainment, as some of the today’s biggest TV shows and movies are based on graphic novels.

ICPL’s graphic novel collection has followed this trend, with more titles added to our shelves every year. As such, we decided to add a graphic novel category to our end-of-the-year staff picks list. This list includes titles found in the children’s room and the Library’s second floor.

ICPL’s BEST GRAPHIC NOVELS OF 2015graphicnovelHDR

  • Intro to Alien Invasion by Owen King and Mark Jude Poirier and Nancy Ahn
  • Hawkeye Volume 4: Rio Bravo by Matt Fraction and Francesco Francavilla
  • Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson
  • Sunny Side Up by Jennifer and Matt Holm
  • The Sculptor by Scott McCloud
  • Space Dumplins by Craig Thompson
  • Killing and Dying by Adrian Tomine
  • Star Wars: Darth Vader Vol. 1 by Kieron Gillen and Salvador Larocca
  • Through the Woods by Emily Carroll
  • Step Aside Pops: A Hark! A Vagrant Collection by Kate Beaton
  • A Silent Voice by Yoshitoki Oima*

* This title was originally released in 2013. It wasn’t published in English until 2015, which is why it’s included on our list.

 

Uproariously funny and irreverent take on modern pregnancy and parenting

by Melody Dworak on November 3rd, 2015
Uproariously funny and irreverent take on modern pregnancy and parenting Cover Image

Emily Flake’s Mama Tried: Dispatches from the Seamy Underbelly of Modern Parenting hilariously pokes fun at experiences of expectant and first-time parents, particularly those of women who established careers and were fully independent thinkers before deciding to start a family.

At eight months pregnant myself, I peeled through the first third of her book, howling with laughter every few pages or so. I can identify with dealing with “swole” feet and eating cookies to make the baby kick (and just to eat cookies). This book was much needed comic relief for my final stretch as a pregnant lady.

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a Title for Adult and Teenage Girls

by Frances Owens on October 19th, 2015
a Title for Adult and Teenage Girls Cover Image

I don’t have very much time for reading what with balancing work, school, and the rest of life, so lately I have turned to graphic novels to stimulate my love of the printed word.  This has led to me finally reading Saga by Brian Vaughn, reacquainting myself with childhood (and local) favorite Bloom County, and of course the Diary of a Teenage Girl by Phoebe Gloeckner which is the subject of this particular blog post.

I will grant that I am a little tardy to the party on this book as it originally came out back in 2002, but it was recently adapted into a film directed by Marielle Heller starring Bel Powley in the titular role, but also Kristin Wiig and Alexander Skarsgard.  Besides being excited for the movie because it was playing at Iowa City’s own FilmScene, the director of the movie AND the author of the book were interviewed on NPR’s Fresh Air.  Being the library worker such that I am I figured I must read the book first.

I was quite glad that I did as I found it to be one of the most honest portrayals of life as a teenage girl just as the title suggests.  It was painfully honest even.  Warning to those that maybe more sensitive than others: this book is pretty scandalous on every front.  Language, sex, drugs are all present along with a healthy dose of what is often termed “age inappropriate content”.  Another of Gloeckner’s graphic novels, A Child’s Life and Other Stories, was banned from the public library in Stockton, CA in fact.  However in belated celebration of banned books week I recommend checking out the Diary of a Teenage Girl.  It is truly an unforgettable read!

As to the visual content, this book really is more of a novel than a graphic novel, but what art there is reminds the reader of one of Gloeckner’s big influences, R. Crumb.




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