Posts Tagged ‘Mock Caldecott’


The Prince and the Dressmaker

by Casey Maynard on November 16th, 2018

The Prince and the Dressmaker The first of our Mock Caldecott selections up for review is Jen Wang’s “The Prince and the Dressmaker”. Set in Paris at the turn of the century, this graphic novel is part realistic fiction, part fairy tale and wholly delightful. Not only is the story exquisite, expanding on all of the wonderful fairy tale tropes with which audiences are familiar, but the visual storytelling is truly remarkable.

Since we’re focusing on the art, all I will say plot wise is that this is about a young prince, Sebastian, who enjoys dresses and whose parents are trying to find him a marriage match. He happens across an up an coming haute couture seamstress, Frances, who agrees to make dresses for him to wear in secret. Tensions arise as Frances tries to reconcile wanting to help Sebastian and keep his secret with wanting to further her career. Read the rest of this entry »

ICPL’s 2019 Mock Caldecott Awards

by Casey Maynard on November 12th, 2018

In preparation for the ALA’s Youth Media Awards librarians and educators all over the country are talking about who could win, in particular the Newbery and Caldecott. Here at ICPL we like to host our own mini version of the awards in the months leading up to the announcement. This year we have narrowed the field of Caldecott eligible titles to 10. I will review one each Friday until we announce ICPL’s winners on January 25th. Voting for the ICPL’s mock awards will begin on December 1st and run through January 21st.

Without further ado, here is the list of ICPL’s Mock Caldecott contenders for 2019–disclaimer they are listed and will be reviewed in order of publication date.

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Mock Caldecott Review: The Antlered Ship

by Casey Maynard on January 12th, 2018

Related imagePrepare to go on a quest seeking the answers to Marco the fox’s world of questions. The journey may be tough, and you may go hungry. But in the end you’ll be much wiser, though the questions have changed and many have gone unanswered. The Antlered Ship serves as a lovely reminder that the journey is just as if not more important than the destination.

As lyrical as it is visually stunning The Antlered Ship delivers a narrative packed with multiple juxtaposed tones. Humor and gloom walk hand in hand, existentialism meets realism and whimsy, danger. The art and text perfectly compliment each other with the Fan brothers bringing great emotive depth to their otherwise non anthropomorphic animal characters.

Be sure to check out the Terry and Eric Fan’s works from 2016, The Night Gardener and The Darkest Dark and if The Antlered Ship is your favorite be sure to vote in our Mock Caldecott awards by January 31st. Related image

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Mock Caldecott Review: Grand Canyon

by Casey Maynard on January 5th, 2018

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This week we are taking a look at Jason Chin’s Grand CanyonIf you are unfamiliar with Chin’s nonfiction works, I encourage you to give Gravity, Redwoods, Coral Reefsand Island a look as well.

Grand Canyon is a fabulous story about a father and daughter exploring this natural wonder and serves as a young reader’s reference guide to the canyon’s geology and ecology past and present. Readers of all ages will find something to enjoy from the narrative and the immersive artwork to the heavily researched back matter. Chin’s book design soars using every piece of the pages to further illuminate life in and the history of the canyon. His use of marginal imagery is particularly lovely. Also be sure to note the wonderful fossil cutouts that set up page turns to the distant past and the fantastic gatefold vista at the end.

Check this one out and let us know if it’s your favorite by voting in ICPL’s Mock Caldecott Awards by January 31st.

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Mock Caldecott Review: Wolf in the Snow

by Casey Maynard on December 29th, 2017

Given the current conditions in Iowa City, our next Mock Caldecott review is fitting. It has been almost a year since the publication of Matthew Cordell’s Wolf in the Snow and somehow it remains as fresh and vibrant as it was when I first saw it last January. It was also just given a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor. Though stylistically reminiscent of Cordell’s other works, Dream and Bob, Not Bob!  specifically, the juxtaposition of realistic pen and ink wolves with cartoonesque watercolor characters is something entirely new. Cordell takes risks here and they all pay off, turning narrative and artistic tropes we see in many picture books and fairy tales on their heads. Be sure to look out for his consistent use of shape and color as well as the incredible expressiveness he manages to show with our protagonist’s very limited facial space. There’s also a special surprise under the dust jacket you won’t want to miss. If you love this book be sure to vote for it as our 2018 Mock Caldecott winner by January 31st.

 

Mock Caldecott Review: Maya Lin: Artist-Architect of Light and Lines

by Casey Maynard on December 22nd, 2017

Related image Maya Lin: Artist-Architect of Light and Lines is one of the most successful picture book biographies that I have seen to date.  Not only is the text fantastic, illuminating Lin’s childhood experiences and passion for art and the earth, but Dow Phumiruk’s illustrations soar. This is her debut picture book and it is simply stunning. Phumiruk’s use of a soft color palette, crisp edges and incredible perspective along with Harvey’s succinct blocks of text mirrors Lin’s minimalist nature inspired structures.  Phumiruk also utilizes large negative space inviting readers to approach Lin’s life and work with the same quiet introspection inspired by Lin’s art. Overall this nonfiction title is wonderfully accessible and is a beautiful tribute to one of the most influential modern artist-architects. Related image

Mock Caldecott Review: Now

by Casey Maynard on December 15th, 2017

Image result for now antoinette portisAntoinette Portis consistently creates delightful read alouds for children and her latest, Nowis a treasure. A young girl shows us her favorite things including a paper boat, a song, a worm and mud. As we follow her throughout her day it becomes apparent that everything she does and has is her favorite, because it is what she is experiencing in the moment.

The exception emerges at the end of the title with her “favorite now”. Pay particular attention to Portis’s masterful use of negative space, vibrant colors and exaggerated brush strokes encouraging breath and space throughout.  Not only is this picture book a joy to read, but much like Wait before, it serves as a reminder to slow down and live every moment to its fullest potential.

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Mock Caldecott Review: Full of Fall

by Casey Maynard on December 8th, 2017
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Librarians and educators are constantly seeking books about seasons and revisit perennial favorites for storytimes and classroom use year after year. Full of Fall has quickly become one of those favorites.

Utilizing short rhyming text with breathtaking photos of fall foliage, animals and scenes, April Pulley Sayre gives readers a lush reminder of why fall is so lovely. Combined with a hearty amount of backmatter including information regarding why leaves change color, how animals prepare for winter and which trees are marcescent, this title is perfect for older readers looking to glean more information about seasonal change as well. A photo illustrated book has never won the Caldecott, Full of Fall would be a perfect first.

On a personal note, as a fellow Hoosier, from the northwest part of the state, I loved seeing some of my childhood stomping grounds represented here. In particular Sayre has used fantastic scenes from Potato Creek State Park and Warren Dunes . Also, sometimes I really miss seeing the red pine squirrels featured in this title–they’re just so cute!

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Drum Roll, Please…

by Casey Maynard on January 3rd, 2017

Image result for caldecott medal pngThe votes have been tallied with more than 100 cast for our Mock Caldecott nominees. Of the fifteen titles chosen we are naming one winner and five honor books as there was a tie for the fourth space. Without any further ado, let’s get to which titles you chose to represent ICPL’s first Mock Caldecott Award.

And the Winner is…

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Mock Caldecott Award 2016

by Casey Maynard on December 5th, 2016

This year we are trying something new at ICPL, a Mock Caldecott award.  Every year, the American Library Association awards the Randolph Caldecott Medal to a distinguished American picture book. For full eligibility requirements and criteria please visit the AlA’s Caldecott website. Also, stop by the Children’s Room to see a wonderful and informative display regarding the history of the award that Mari Redington has put together in the small display case.

Keeping eligibility requirements in mind we have put together a list of 15 possible contenders for the 2017 award. We ask that you read all of these titles before voting, or as many as you can get your hands on. When voting please pick and rank your top five titles: one winner (1) and four honor books (2-5). Paper ballots are available and are being collected at the Children’s Room Desk.  If you are unable to cast a paper ballot and are familiar with the titles, then please feel free to comment with your top five on or before December 31st.

We will be announcing the winning ICPL Caldecott titles at the beginning of 2017, shortly before the ALA midwinter meeting where they will be announcing the Medal and Honor winners.  How fun would it be if we have picked a winner or an honor book?!  Read the rest of this entry »