Posts Tagged ‘parenting’


Language and Literacy Skills Start Early: Before Birth!

by Karen Gordon on January 31st, 2019

Families are faced with many changes after baby arrives, but implementing a daily reading routine doesn’t need to be one of them.

Today the Iowa City Public Library launches a new program – Belly Baby Reads – to help growing families encourage literacy. While many early literacy programs focus on children after they’re born,  Belly Baby Reads fosters literacy before a child’s arrival by focusing on the expecting family.

hello baby animalsThe library’s Belly Baby Reads program encourages families to develop a reading routine before baby arrives, empowering caregivers to become more confident as a child’s first teachers. By encouraging expecting families to do 50 “read alouds”  before baby arrives, parents become more comfortable reading aloud, siblings can practice their literacy skills, and families can build a routine around reading, creating a bonding experience that sets the tone and expectation that reading is important and valued at home. Families will receive a black and white board book upon registering, and when they finish 50 “read alouds.”

Belly Baby Reads is the perfect tie-in to Iowa City Public Library’s 1,000 BooksHello Animals Before Kindergarten that was started in 2016 with a generous grant from Pearson. Once families complete Belly Babies Reads, their new baby will be signed up for the 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program.

Visit www.icpl.org/kids and click on the Belly Babies link to register or find more information, or register at the Children’s Desk.

Belly Babies Reads was inspired by the Stork Storytime programming created by Jennifer Jordebrek and developed in collaboration with the North Liberty Community Library.”

Effective Ways to Talk to Kids so Kids Will Listen

by Karen Gordon on February 15th, 2017

I babysit my 3 year old grandson on Thursdays. He’s a good kid and he’s lucky that communication and parenting are loving and consistent in his home.

Theo and Mimi "Date" at the Children's Museum

Theo and Mimi “Date” at the Children’s Museum.

Many times we have “Grandma dates.”  Like all kids, Theo likes to test me: can he have chocolate? Can he stay up late or watch more TV?   Well, I think it’s a really important to respect mommy and daddy’s routine. However, he IS with grandma and well, it is grandma time! So every once in a while we do things out of mom and dad’s routine, and sometimes behavior issues will arise. I like to communicate clearly and fairly while encouraging Theo to do the things I would like him to do, not the things I don’t want him to do. How do I deal with behavior struggles in a positive way?

Here is a list of books worth reading. These books are practical and inspiring reads which changed the way I relate to Theo so I can become the grandparent I always wanted to be. These titles I recommend to parents, teachers, librarians, and grandparents, or anyone who works with children.

Parents need to start positive communication techniques sooner rather than later. And by the way, these same methods and techniques enhance communication between adults in all aspects of life.

easy-to-love Easy to Love, Difficult to Discipline: The Seven Basic Skills for Turning Conflict into Cooperation by Becky A. Bailey. Learn how to stop policing and pleading and become the parent you want to be.

You love your children, but if you’re like most parents, you don’t always love their behavior. But how can you guide them without resorting to less-than-optimal behavior yourself? Dr. Becky Bailey’s unusual and powerful approach to parenting has made thousands of families happier and healthier.

how-to-be-the-parent-you-alwaysHow to Be the Parent You Always Wanted to Be by Adele Faber & Elaine Mazlish. This helpful little book under 100 pages, also has a CD so you can listen to simple principles that I was able to start right away. This method helps raise kids who are compassionate, caring feelings or others (because they have never been denied their feelings) considerate, respectful and able to make the right decision.

how-to-talk-to-kids-soHow To Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk by Adele Faber & Elaine Mazlish.

Faber and Mazlish use real-life situations to show how you can respect and respond to your child’s feelings and satisfy your own needs.

the-emotional-life-of-a-toddlerThe Emotional Life of the Toddler by Alicia F. Lieberman.  Why do toddlers throw tantrums?  What might they be feeling, and how is it developmentally motivated?  This book is a great resource for parents struggling with the strong, conflicting      emotions of a toddler.  Lieberman explains what is behind the outward manifestations of these feelings, and gives us positive, loving, and empathetic ways to support our children, and ourselves, during this time.

 

 

No-Cry Sleep Training for Noobs

by Melody Dworak on February 2nd, 2017
Budeme všichni spát by Czech artist Barbora Bálková, via WikiMedia

Budeme všichni spát by Czech artist Barbora Bálková, via WikiMedia

A week ago, I begged experienced mom and fellow Info Desk staffer, Jen, for help finding books on sleep-training for new parents like me who don’t know what they’re doing.

“I can’t do Cry It Out!” I cried. We got a Dewey number for me to check the shelf, and she promised to get back to me with a couple titles that would be right up my alley as a tears-adverse bedtime executive. Read the rest of this entry »

Teaching Your Baby to Sign

by Jennifer Eilers on May 4th, 2016

My baby is turning 6 months old soon which was about the age that I began introducing my preschooler to sign language (well maybe a little later–second baby after all).  I decided to teach my first child to sign because sign language helps children express their needs. Research shows that most children can understand language earlier than they can express it verbally. Sign is a great method for expression because it takes advantage of a child’s early hand coordination while introducing them to language.

If you are interested in teaching your child to sign, the library has many ways to help you learn. There are several great books and DVDs in our non-fiction and children’s collections like Baby talk: a guide to using basic sign language to communicate with your baby and Baby Signing Time. The library also has a language learning program, Mango, that offers a course in American Sign Language. You can access Mango from home if you are a resident of Iowa City, University Heights, Hills, Lone Tree, and rural Johnson County. You just need your library card and password/pin to login.

While my preschooler started to use sign language less and less as she became more capable of expressing herself verbally, sign language still plays a role in her life. I like that I can communicate with her from across the playground signing “STOP” if I want her to be more cautious.  And I’ve enjoyed seeing her enthusiasm for signs bubbling up again as she shows the baby signs for “milk” and “more.”