Posts Tagged ‘Pets’


Mock Caldecott Reviews: Little Fox & Little Cat

by Casey Maynard on December 1st, 2017

Since last week was Thanksgiving, I am starting the reviews of our ten mock Caldecott titles with a two for one. This week I will be taking a look at Little Fox in the Forest by Stephanie Graegin and Big Cat Little Cat by Elisha Cooper. With these reviews I aim to discuss why a book has been chosen for mock Caldecott consideration without giving too much away–I want you to form your own opinions about these wonderful titles. Without further ado let’s take a look at Little Fox in the Forest  and Big Cat Little Cat. 

Earlier this year I posted a short blog about Stephanie Graegin’s Little Fox in the Forest. Not only is this wordless title absolutely adorable, but the message is heartfelt. Graegin’s use of color as narrative structure is lovely and the movement between spreads and panels sets the pacing of this title apart. Clearly written with children’s sensibilities in mind, the intricate details wrought on every page lend depth to characters and the world Graegin has made. Immensely successful artistically and emotionally, the emotive power of this text is palpable without becoming pedantic.

However, library packaging is problematic here. The endsheets are paramount to the narrative, since the dust jackets have been taped down for circulation some of the intricacies of the story can be lost. I suggest being very gentle and taking a peek under the beautiful wrap around jacket to get a glimpse of both the cover and the endsheets.

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Elisha Cooper’s Big Cat Little Cat is a beautiful homage to love, loss and the nature of change. Set in black and white, utilizing deceptively simple illustrations and large negative spaces, Big Cat Little Cat also serves as an exploration of Yin and Yang.

A black kitten is brought into a family with an adult white cat. We see these two learn, play, grow and of course nap together. The cats are opposites in many ways, coloring, size, age, personality and yet are also completely complementary much like Yin and Yang. The visual reference to the ancient Taoist symbol is made more than once with full bleed illustrations on a striking yellow background. Like Yin and Yang, the cats are separate entities yet create balance and harmony together. The dualistic and transformative nature of Yin and Yang comes into play by the end of the narrative as well.  Simple, powerful and universal, Big Cat Little Cat tackles a tough issue with beauty and tenderness.

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