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On Air – The ICPL Podcast: Episode 10

by Bond Drager on March 24th, 2015

Get the podcast here or from iTunes or Stitcher

“Great Movies that Didn’t Win Oscars, and Jen’s Dating Game Results”

This month the gang discusses Great Movies that Didn’t Win Oscars plus Jen is back with follow up on how her Blind Date with a Book went.

00:41:What we’re reading/watching/listening to Jen: Anna & the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
01:19 Brian – The Martian by Andy Weir
03:21 Melody – Tim Johnston’s Descent
04:41 Jason – Louise Penny
6:02 Melody Isa Chandra Moskowitz’s Appetite for Reduction
06:40 Meredith – Maeve Binchy’s new biography
08:35 Great Movies that Didn’t Win Oscars
09:10 Brian – LA Confidential loses to Titanic
14:35 Jason – Movie Scores – Psycho
19:25 Melody – Bechdel Test Movies – A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night/Before Midnight
26:27 Jen – Sense and Sensibility
28:03 Meredith – Shawshank Redemption
30:17 Brian – Short Term 12
32:39 Jason – Last of the Mohicans
36:53 Jen – The Descendants
41:37 Jen’s Dating Game Follow Up – The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

Video Staff Picks: March 2015 – Music, Quick Reads, and More

by Bond Drager on March 23rd, 2015

This month we share a musician who will be performing at the upcoming Mission Creek Festival, a quick read, a mystery, and a book Maeve describes as a “Gateway from fiction to nonfiction.” Enjoy!

Sound of Music Sing-Along at ICPL March 4

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on February 26th, 2015

The halls of the Iowa City Public Library will be filled with the sound of music Wednesday, March 4, during our film screening and sing-along. SoundofMusic

The film version starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer celebrates its 50th Anniversary this year. It was originally released on March 2, 1965.

The Sound of Music is about a young woman who leaves an Austrian convent to become a governess to the seven children of a naval officer widower. The movie is an adaptation of the 1959 Broadway musical of the same name. Both the film and the musical are based on the book The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria von Trapp.

The movie begins at 7 p.m. in Meeting Room A on March 4. Singing on key is not required, and we’ll leave the captioning on for the words. Free popcorn will be provided.

For more information, call the Library at (319) 356-5200.

Serendipity in the Stacks

by Kara Logsden on February 23rd, 2015

Recently we had a great conversation at the Help Desk about good movies. A patron read my blog post about the 100 Foot Journey and suggested The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. I love when I get suggestions from people I’m helping – it’s a bit of serendipity in my day. There have also been many conversations leading up to the Oscars, and it’s fun to hear what others think about different movies.

One of the more interesting conversations last week was about The Grand Budapest Hotel and the facial hair of the actors. Stories from National Public Radio and Esquire Magazine piqued our interest and had me guessing which mustaches were real and which were not. According to NPR:

“They’re made of real human hair, which you buy in all different textures and colors,” says Hannon. “There’s usually five minimum colors in each mustache.”

The hairs are sewn individually into tiny holes — less than a half-millimeter in diameter — of what Hannon calls “the finest silk lace you can find. … So you can imagine the time that goes into the perfection of each.”

My holds for The Grand Budapest Hotel and The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel came in before the weekend, so we had a great movie fest Friday and Saturday with a hotel theme. Although both movies were very good, they were very different. While I enjoyed the precision and scenery in The Grand Budapest Hotel, I especially enjoyed the heartwarming story and characters in The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Another bit of serendipity today … when writing this post I learned the there’s a sequel to look forward to – The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel opens in theatres on March 6th.

Give us a call or stop by if you need help finding a good movie or want to place a hold on the Oscar nominees or winners. You may discover your own serendipity in the stacks :)

100 Foot Journey

by Kara Logsden on February 5th, 2015
100 Foot Journey Cover Image

I love books made into movies. I like to compare the two, think about which one I like better (it’s usually the book), and talk to others about what they think.

The 100 Foot Journey (Book and Movie) is a coming of age story of Hassan, a young aspiring chef from Mumbai with a loving family who has experienced great tragedy, and Madame Mallory, a Michelin-starred French chef who experiences a spiritual awakening after involvement with one of the tragedies experienced by Hassan and his family.

I didn’t discover the book, published in 2010, until I read a review for the 2014 movie. I was intrigued so I asked the Library to purchase the book on disc. I LOVED it – listening felt like a vicarious trip to Mumbai, England and the French countryside. There was strong character development, a strong sense of place, and a compelling story with memorable characters. After listening, I wanted more from the author Richard Morais.

Last weekend I had the opportunity to watch the movie with my family and everyone enjoyed it. The movie was produced by Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey for DreamWorks Pictures. Just like the book, there were memorable characters and a strong sense of place. Helen Mirren was a perfect Madame Mallory and I especially liked Om Puri as the PaPa.

Knowing I’d read the book, my family was curious if I liked the book or the movie better. In this case, and just like To Kill A Mockingbird, I liked both. I enjoyed each in different ways, and would definitely enjoy reading the book or seeing the movie again.

If you watch the movie or read the book, I’d like to hear what you think. Enjoy!

Iowa City Public Library to screen Raising Ms. President

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on October 10th, 2014

The Iowa City Public Library will show a free screening of “Raising Ms. President,” a documentary about raising the next generation of female political leaders, at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 8, in Meeting Room A. raising ms prez

Studies show that when more women are at the political decision-making table, their presence makes a difference. The problem, though, is that many women don’t want to run for office, saying they are underqualified. This is despite the fact that women make up more than 50 percent of the population and workforce, are college graduates, and have higher earning power before their reach their 30th birthday.

“Raising Ms. President” looks at where political ambition begins and how to get more women to run for office in order to create a stronger country and world.

This screening is free and open to the public. It is co-sponsored by the Library, the League of Women Voters of Johnson County, Girls on the Run of Eastern Iowa, and the Girl Scouts of Eastern Iowa and Western Illinois.

For more information, call the Library at (319) 356-5200.

ICPL Presents “The Name is Bond … James Bond”

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on September 22nd, 2014
ICPL Presents “The Name is Bond … James Bond” Cover Image

Tap into your inner spy in October with the Iowa City Public Library’s “The Name is Bond … James Bond” film series.

During October, a free screening of a James Bond movie will be shown every Thursday in Meeting Room A.

Thursday, Oct. 2: Dr. NoJamesBond

Released in 1962, the first James Bond movie remains one of the best. Starring Sean Connery as James Bond, watch as the M16 agent is called to Jamaica where a colleague and secretary have been mysteriously killed. With an American CIA agent, portrayed by Jack Lord, they discover that Dr. No (Joseph Wiseman) is scheming to blackmail the U.S. government with a device capable of deflecting and destroying U.S. rockets launched from Cape Canaveral. Directed by Terence Young; 110 minutes.

Thursday, Oct. 9: Goldfinger

Sean Connery returns as James Bond in this 1964 film. This time, Bond must go to Fort Knox and stop Auric Goldfinger and his henchman from obliterating the world economy. Goldfinger not only contains many of the series’ most memorable scenes, it is the film that introduces Desmond Llewelyn as Q. Directed by Guy Hamilton; 110 minutes.

Thursday, Oct. 16: The Spy Who Loved Me

Roger Moore dons James Bond’s tuxedo in this 1977 film that introduced the steel-toothed Jaws (played by Richard Kiel) as one of the most memorable Bond villains. In this movie, Bond teams up with yet a Russian agent (Barbara Bach) to track a pair of nuclear submarines that the nefarious Stromberg (Curt Jürgens) plans to use in his plot to start World War III. Directed by Lewis Gilbert; 125 minutes.

Thursday, Oct. 23: GoldenEye

This 1995 film was a box-office success, thanks to Pierce Brosnan’s portrayal at the suave, danger-loving 007. When a deadly satellite weapon that can fire a devastating electromagnetic pulse toward Earth falls into the wrong hands, only James Bond can save the world from certain disaster, but he is up against an enemy who anticipates his every move. Directed by Martin Campbell; 130 minutes.

Thursday, Oct. 30: Casino Royale

This series reboot released in 2006 established a new timeline and narrative framework to show a less experienced and more vulnerable Bond, portrayed by Daniel Craig. On his first mission as a 00, Bond travels to Madagascar, the Bahamas and eventually to Montenegro to face Le Chiffre, a ruthless financier attempting to recapture funds in a high-stakes poker game at the Casino Royale. Directed by Martin Campbell; 144 minutes.

All films begin at 7 p.m. and popcorn will be provided.

Iowa City Public Library Lowers Overdue Fines, Increases Hold Limits

by Meredith Hines-Dochterman on September 2nd, 2014
Iowa City Public Library Lowers Overdue Fines, Increases Hold Limits Cover Image

 

Effective Tuesday, Sept. 2, patrons will be charged 25-cents per item per day for materials returned past their due date. This is effective for all items, except Express DVDs and circulating equipment, which will remain $1 per item per day, and circulating game consoles which remain at $5 per day.hold shelf 3

The Iowa City Public Library Board of Trustees approved a policy change Thursday.

Library patrons also will be able to have 10 free holds in the system, an increase from eight. Holds may be placed for all types of circulating materials, except for the Express Collections. Patrons are notified when an item is ready for pickup.

Additional holds, beyond the limit of 10, may be placed for the patron by a Library staff member for 50-cents each.

“The purpose of fines is to provide an incentive for on-time return of Library materials. Our overarching goal is to assure materials are available for the community. One fine rate at 25 cents per day, with a couple exceptions, will be easy for our community to remember,” says Kara Logsden, Community and Access Services Coordinator.

For more information, contact the Library at (319) 356-5200.

 

Video Staff Picks – British TV and Getting the Body of a Werewolf

by Bond Drager on July 10th, 2014

Jason talks about a British mystery series you may have missed, and Melody shows that the library can teach you how to have the body of a werewolf.

Hey Movie fans!

by Beth Fisher on January 6th, 2013
Hey Movie fans! Cover Image

Do you ever find yourself standing in front of the DVD collection completely unable to find something “good” to watch?  You’re in the mood for a movie, but just can’t think of a particular title, and nothing seems to pique your interest?

Well according to Rob Christopher’s new book “Queue Tips: Discovering Your Next Great Movie” finding a good movie spontaneously is really a crap shoot.   Just like most other things in life, it takes a bit of thought or planning to find a good movie – if “good” is really what you’re in the mood for.

This book is by no means a “Best List.”   Christopher and his 10 guest contributors (including comedian Julia Sweeney, author Barry Gifford, and jazz musician Ken Vandermark)  have come up with 24 themed lists that will hopefully help you create your own list of movies you want to watch – your own personal queue.

What do Psycho (1960), The Thin Man (1934) and Die Hard (1988) have in common?

Psycho and Other Surprising Christmastime Movies

How about: Seven Samurai (1954), Mad Max (1979) and Outland (1981) ?

“Nine Westerns That Aren’t Westerns”

Or  Reefer Madness (1938), Logan’s Run (1976) and Showgirls (1995) ?

“Ten Movies So Bad They’re Good”

The lists in this book just might surprise you: “Better Than the Book”,  “Movies Guaranteed To Make you Cry,”  “Flops That Actually Aren’t Half Bad” and my two favorites “Bettter Than The Book!” and “Favorite Late-Night Spooky Films.”   This book is definitely worth getting in the queue for.

 

 

 

 

 




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