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Through the Woods

by on April 27th, 2015

Since I was small I have loved fairytales. It began with the original Grimm’s tales my mother read. I remember the illustrations more clearly than anything: the image of Rapunzel’s prince stumThrough the Woods Coverbling and blinded after being thrown from the tower is one I can conjure readily. Since that time, I have read as many fairytales and retellings as I could get my hands on. It is only as an adult that I recognize the why of this love for, even obsession with fairytales that began as a child.  These traditional stories encompass something innately human that has the capacity to be retold in multifarious ways, thus remaining fresh, somehow unencumbered by its own redundancy.

Recently this passion for all things fabled has led me to the work of Emily Carroll.  With many of her graphic short stories debuting online, it was not until July of last year that Carroll’s first book came into print. Through the Woods is a collection of five short stories all of which find their center in the forest. Definitely not your childhood bedtime stories, each is reminiscent of the archetype while simultaneously obliterating the gap between traditional fairytale and horror.through the woods

Where Grimm’s fairy tales hinted at the horror that awaited villains–red-hot iron shoes come to mind–Carroll’s tales thrust the reader into truly terrifying confrontations with evil.  Evil that not only surrounds each of us but has the capacity to be found within us as well.  It is in this way that Emily Carroll’s Through the Woods, leaves the reader unsettled, searching for a happy ending when we know that the journey will begin all over again tomorrow.Into the Woods

Accompanied by beautiful full color illustrations that bleed into text, Carroll’s graphic novel debut is stunning.  She leaves the reader the space to interpret what is left in the darkness of each page, unsaid and just out of reach.

For more of her stories and for a sneak peek of Through the Woods be sure to check out “His Face All Red” and the rest of her website,

Emily Carroll’s Website

through the woods

 

 

 

 

Bike to Work Week at ICPL

by on April 27th, 2015

May is National Bike Month and the Iowa City Public Library is ready to celebrate Bike to Work Week May 3 through May 8.bike to work week

Join us at Wheely Fun Bike Basics from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Monday, May 4, in Meeting Room A to learn basic bicycle maintenance. This event, co-sponsored by the Iowa City Bike Library, will show participants how to change or patch a flat tire, and adjust brakes and gears.

Bikes and Books will be held from noon to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, May 7. Bring your lunch and participate in a book discussion about bikes. We’ll share books about biking, books you should take biking, bike maintenance titles, and books by bicycling authors.

Bike to Work Week is supported by the cities of Coralville, Iowa City, and University Heights, Johnson County, and Think Bicycles of Johnson County.

The National Bike to Work Week celebration is scheduled for May 11 through May 15.

For more information, contact the Library at (319) 356-5200.

New Digital Magazine App: Zinio for Libraries

by on April 27th, 2015

 

tl;dr If you’ve never tried out our digital magazines, sign up at Zinio Magazine Collection web page and download the Zinio for Libraries app for Android and Apple!

ZinioforLibraries_0The Long Version

In the fall of 2012, the Iowa City Public Library began offering digital magazines through a service called Zinio. Two and a half years later, we have grown to offering more than 150 digital magazine titles. We also now offer a more streamlined experience for signing up as a new user.

The Zinio for Libraries app is a new app that allows you to fill out one simple form after clicking “Create New Account” on our Zinio Magazine Collection web page. Once you fill out this form, you are ready to start browsing and reading on your computer.

For those who are new to Zinio, you can download the Zinio for Libraries app for Apple and Android devices. This new app has fewer distractions than the previous app we were required to use. The Zinio for Libraries app will open straightaway to the magazines you have checked out. It will not show you any content that you have to buy in order to read.

ZinioforLibraries_1New users, please note: When you go to download the app, be sure to choose the Zinio for Libraries app with the white background and dark colored Z. If you see the regular Zinio app with the dark square and Zinio name in white, that is the app that has all that extra commercial content. Your login information will *not* work on the commercial app.

Already Use Zinio? Read the rest of this entry »

5 books that I have not read

by on April 24th, 2015

At least I haven’t read them in the way that most people read books. I mostly read nonfiction, usually how to do or make something instead of just facts. I rarely read books cover to cover. I skim them and find the parts that either have the information I am looking for or a part that grabs my attention. That makes writing about books a little more difficult for me. While searching through my Reading History to find something to write about I noticed a few recurring themes.

I have always been fascinated by patterns. One small thing repeated over and over can create something big and beautiful. This has been a repeating pattern in my reading history. I would check them out, head to the craft store for supplies and see what I could make. Below are a few of many I have checked out and have not read.

 

The complete book of decorative knots

knotMy parents were a little confused when I asked for a book about Turk’s head knots for Christmas a few years ago. But it came with a little, adjustable tool and hundreds of knot patterns to make. The Library doesn’t own that book, but we do have several about knots. The complete book of decorative knots is one I have checked out several times. It is well illustrated and covers Turk’s heads as well as globe knots, mats and a variety of other knots which look pretty cool when done.

 

 

 

Chain maille jewelry workshop

chainFor a little while I was slightly obsessed with chain mail, as well as Viking knitting. The Library has several books which cover the basics of making chain mail. I think all of them have projects that they work through step by step. Most also have gallery sections to show what various artists have created with chain mail to help you find some inspiration.

 

 

 

Origami tessellations

tessI liked this so much that I bought my own copy. This involves a LOT of paper folding to make grids and then making patterns by folding the grid in different ways. These look great and if you put a light behind it you get a totally different pattern. Twofer! I adapted one of these patterns to make a lamp shade for a lamp I built.

 

 

 

Unit polyhedron origami

unitThis is another one that I bought. Also another one that I used for two lamp shades. Basically this is folding a piece of paper into a interlocking shape and then doing that over and over until you have enough of these shapes to assemble them into a variety of larger geometric shapes.

 

 

 

Arm and finger knitting

armBefore the Library owned this book I made a great infinity scarf for my significant other. I was kind of excited to find out we had purchased this book. Personally I didn’t care much for most of the projects in it but it does still show how to arm knit in general. Once you know that you can go out and find or make your own patterns to knit.

 

 

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On Air: The ICPL Podcast Episode 11

by on April 24th, 2015

Episode 11 of On Air: The ICPL Podcast is now available.on-air-the-icpl-podcast-large

This month the gang discusses when to quit an ongoing series, as well as entertainment binge-consuming and book clubs!

00:50: What we’re reading/watching/listening to. Brian- “Fadeout” by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips

01:46: Jason- “Vesper for a New Dark Age” by Missy Mazzoli

03:25: Roomfull of Teeth

04:11: Meredith- “A Little Something Different” by Sandy Hall

06:04: Melody- “Dead Heat” by Patricia Briggs

07:05: When do you quit reading a Series?

18:45: TV Binge-Watching

22:33: Binge Listening Music

26:25: Consuming Comic Books

29:45: Melody- Online Book Clubs

30:00: Facebook, A Year in Books

31:30: Literary Classics Online Book Club

33:23: Good Reads

34:22: Vaginal Fantasy, Led by Felicia Day

36:30: Discussion on Classic, In-Person Book Clubs

On Air: The ICPL podcast can be accessed here, or from iTunes or Stitcher.

 

Celebrate Local History with Weber on Wednesday at ICPL

by on April 24th, 2015

Are you ready to be WOWed?

WOW — Weber on Wednesday – is a month-long program created specifically for local history buffs. On every Wednesday in May – and a few other dates – the Iowa City Public Library will host an event that delves into Iowa City’s history.

WOW is held in conjunction with Irving B. Weber Days, which are held every May in honor of Iowa City’s unofficial historian, the late Irving B. Weber. May also is National Historical Preservation Month.

Plum Grove Gardens Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Wednesday, May 6 at 7 p.m. in Meeting Room A

Iowa State Extension Master Gardeners Betty Kelly and Caroline Murphy will talk about the gardens at Plum Grove, the home of Iowa’s first Territorial Governor, Robert Lucas. Co-sponsored by the Johnson County Historical Society and Master Gardeners of Johnson County.

ScanIt@ICPL

Saturday, May 9 at 2 p.m. in Meeting Room A

Bring your photos and documents related to Iowa City and Johnson County history, and have them added to the Library’s Digital History Project. Staff will help you scan your items, and send you home with your original and a digital copy. Please bring a USB thumb drive.

A Pictorial History of Downtown Iowa City

Wednesday, May 13 at 7 p.m. in Meeting Room A

Author Marybeth Slonneger will present a program on the history of Downtown Iowa City. Co-sponsored by The Friends of Historic Preservation.

Prohibition, Breweries and Beer Caves in Iowa City

Saturday, May 16 at 2 p.m. in Meeting Room A

Marlin Ingalls, Architectural Historian, will give a presentation on prohibition, breweries and the beer caves in Iowa City.

Iowa City Food History from 1830 -1900

Wednesday, May 20 at 7 p.m. in Meeting Room A

Rachel Wobeter, a University of Iowa Museum Studies student, will give a tour of Iowa City’s food history, sharing photos and historical notes about the town’s early grocers, brewers, and more. Refreshments will be provided. Co-sponsored by Historic Foodies.

Helen Lemme: A History

Tuesday, May 26 at 7 p.m. in Meeting Room A

Learn about Helen Lemme from the Lemme Elementary sixth-grade girl history detectives. Join them for an ice cream social after the program.

Images of America: Coralville

Wednesday, May 27 at noon in Meeting Room A

Author and Herbert Hoover Presidential Library Director Emeritus Timothy Walch will share stories about Coralville from his new book “Images of America: Coralville.”

History of Iowa City’s Grocery Stores

Wednesday, May 27 at 7 p.m. in Meeting Room A

Tom Schulein, citizen historian, will present a program on the history of Iowa City groceries from the corner store to the superstore. Co-sponsored by the Iowa City/Johnson County Senior Center.

For more information, contact the Library at (319) 356-5200.

Pie Plant – What’s that and what’s it have to do with Irving B. Weber?

by on April 23rd, 2015

Rhubarb- Did you know that rhubarb is also known as pie plant?  I hadn’t heard, (or at least I didn’t remember hearing),  rhubarb called pie plant, (or pieplant), until I lived in Dubuque. However, a little online digging shows that term pie plant has been in written use since 1838.  If you are a Laura Ingalls Wilder fan, you might recall that it from a passage in The First Four Years -Laura was cooking for the threshers, the first dinner in her very own little house, and was running through the menu: “There was pie plant in the garden; she must make a couple of pies.”

A discussion of the term came up last month when I attended a meeting Historic Foodies, a local group with an interest in using recipes from the cookbooks of  yesteryear.  We were using The Iowa City Cook Book, and on page 181 one of our members found the recipe below. Pie PlantThe cookbook dates from 1898 and is chock-full of recipes that will invite much discussion.  You might just recognize the names of prominent Iowa City residents of the past.  In fact, while we at the meeting we consulted Margaret Keyes book Nineteenth century home architecture of Iowa City to see if we could locate the recipe writer’s house. When we did we pulled up the Iowa City assessors website to find out if the house was extant.  It was tremendous fun and we found a good number of the names in Dr. Keyes’ book and many of the houses are still here!

So what does all of this have to do with Irving B. Weber?  First, Weber wrote the introduction to Dr. Keyes book.  Second,  while Weber’s mother doesn’t have any recipes in the cookbook, some of his parent’s neighbors do.  Third, we are just about to celebrate Irving B Weber Days,  webera full month of programming and displays dedicated to local history.  Fourth, the Historic Foodies will be providing refreshments from the Iowa City Cook Book for a program during Weber Days. Make sure you mark your calendar to come to Rachel Wobeter’s talking to tour of Iowa City food history.  Rachel will share her research on what Iowa City folk ate between 1830 and 1900 on Wednesday, May 20 at 7  p.m.  The program will air live on Library Channel 2o.

And finally, what  does pie plant have to do with with Irving Weber?  Well, here’s what I think, I bet you anything Irving ate pie plant in either a pie or as a sauce or maybe even like I did as a child, by dipping the stalk in the sugar bowl and taking a great big bite of sour delight.

 

 

Win a $1000 IRA!

by on April 23rd, 2015

It’s Money Smart Week and the Iowa City Public Library MSWhas a deal for you.  Money Smart Week is a program of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and one of the activities is Dash for the Stash. DASH for the STASH, is an investor education and protection contest. One participant in Iowa will win $1,000 to open or add to an Individual Retirement Account.

The DASH for the STASH contest works much like a scavenger hunt. But instead of collecting objects, players gather information and leave answers to quiz questions on four posters.  Each poster focuses on one investor education and protection topic, and each poster topic features an associated quiz question to answer. To play, participants read the content on each poster, scan the unique QR code to access that topic’s quiz question (multiple choice), and submit their answer via smartphone, tablet, or computer. Participants must have the QR app (free download) on a mobile device in order to scan QR codes and access the quiz.  The posters are located on the first floor Gallery.  The contest runs through Sunday, April 26 at the Iowa City Public Library.

The contest is being sponsored by the nonprofit Investor Protection Institute (IPI) and, in Iowa, the Iowa Insurance Division’s Securities Bureau.

ICPL Friends Foundation hosts Looking Forward fundraiser

by on April 23rd, 2015

The board of the Iowa City Public Library Friends Foundation invites the public to attend Looking Forward.L

This premiere event will be held on Sunday, May 17, at the Library. It is designed to expand horizons, achieve support through reservations and attendance, and continue to build long-standing camaraderie among the Library’s devotees.

The evening begins at 6 p.m. with “The Future: From Fiction to Fact,” a presentation by Dan Reed, the University of Iowa’s Vice President of Research and Economic Development, and Brooks Landon, author and an University of Iowa Professor of English.

Guests will be treated to appetizers and beverages, and will have the opportunity to learn more about the Library during “behind-the-scenes” tours.

The cost to attend Looking Forward is $125 per person and reservations are required. To make yours, visit www.icpl.org/support/looking-forward. Reservations must be received by May 8.

For more information, contact Patty McCarthy, Director of Development, at (319) 356-5249 or patty-mccarthy@icpl.org.

ICPL announces May Classes for Adults

by on April 23rd, 2015

May is National Historic Preservation month and the Iowa City Public Library will celebrate by honoring local historian, Irving B. Weber. In conjunction with the many Weber on Wednesday events, the computer classes for adults will focus on history through genealogical research.

Have you ever wondered about your family tree? Not sure how to start searching for your ancestors? Come join us for an Introduction to Genealogy on Friday, May 8, or on Tuesday, May 19, beginning at 10 a.m. A librarian will help you get started by talking about what questions to ask, how to keep track of your information, and places you might want to search.

At 10 a.m. on Monday, May 11, and Friday, May 29, find out how to use the library’s genealogy resources at Using Ancestry.com for Genealogy. Find out how both Ancestry and Heritage Quest, two leading, genealogical databases, can help you solve your family tree mysteries.

All classes for adults are held in the Library’s Computer Lab on the second floor. Classes are free, but space is limited to 10 people per program, so patrons should register early.

Visit www.icpl.org/classes to register online. You can also register by calling the Library at (319) 356-5200.





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