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Read to Feed

by on October 30th, 2014

ReadtoFeed-Poster (2)

With November just around the corner, I am starting to think about FOOD! Holiday menus, edible gifts, cookie exchanges, hot chocolate…and Read to Feed!

Read to Feed is a library program that gives your family an opportunity to kick off the season with true holiday spirit—by giving! Join us in the Storytime Room on Wednesday, Nov. 12, anytime between 2-4 pm for stories, songs, activities, and snacks—and a food drive for The Crisis Center of Johnson County, hosted by The Iowa City Public Library and Rock & Read volunteers from RSVP, Elder Services, Inc. Did you know that one third of the people in households served by the Food Bank are children? Read to Feed gives kids a chance to show they care.

Take advantage of a no-school day (for students in the Iowa City Community School District) for some mid-week entertainment. Rock & Read volunteers will share some of their favorite books, and library staff will lead the group in campfire songs and chants. Throw in some fall snacks, and it’s sure to be a great time!

Drop in anytime and stay as long as you can! The only admission requested is a donation for The Iowa City Crisis Center, such as nonperishable food items or new children’s books. We invite you to join us—partnering together to feed the minds and bodies of Johnson County!

Meeting Rooms @ Your Library

by on October 30th, 2014

2014 meeting roomThe Library offers five meetings rooms for community groups to use.  Library meetings rooms are a busy community resource.  In FY14 the Library hosted 1,508 community meetings in its meeting rooms.  This is in addition to a very busy schedule of Library programs held in the meeting rooms.

According to Library Board Policy, “The purpose of the Library’s meeting rooms is to provide space for library programs and community events, to fulfill the Library’s role as a community center, where the public can attend informational, educational, cultural events and to champion the principle of intellectual freedom by providing a forum for the free exchange of ideas.”

The Library’s meeting rooms are designed to host small groups as well as large community gatherings.  There are eligibility requirements for using the rooms.  Groups using the rooms must be a non-profit corporation, candidate campaign committee, political committee, governmental subdivision or non-profit citizens group.  Groups who do not meet these guidelines are encouraged to use the Library’s study rooms on the 2nd floor or check out a list of alternative meeting room sites in the community.

We recently updated our webpage with information about Library meeting rooms.  You can see more information here.  Groups are welcome to reserve meeting rooms online or call the Library at 319-356-5200 for staff assistance.

 

Patrons’ Reading Suggestions: Children’s Books

by on October 29th, 2014

Are you looking for a new book to read? Let out patrons guide you!read next

The Library has several plastic suggestion boxes for patrons to deposit a slip of paper with the title of a book (or movie, CD or video game) they loved. We recently emptied the suggestion box in the Children’s Room and here are the books they think you should add to your reading list:

  • Korgi, Book 1: Sprouting Wings by Christian Slade
  • The City of Ember (Book of Ember #1) by Jeanne DuPrau
  • Dog vs. Cat by Chris Gall
  • The Circus Ship by Chris Van Dusen
  • The Candymakers by Wendy Mass
  • More Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark by Alvin Schwartz
  • Ellie McDoodle: Have Pen, Will Travel by Ruth McNally Barshaw
  • Young Cam Jensen series by David A. Adler

We keep a running list of all patron suggestions on our goodreads.com account (www.goodreads.com). We also have reviews written by staff members on this site. Take a look and maybe you’ll find your next book to check out!

Books I Want to Read Again

by on October 24th, 2014

This week I had an opportunity to work with two patrons who needed recommendations for great books on disc for a long car 2014 10 road tripride.  One person is facing 14 hours in the car each way.  The other patron decided to ask a Librarian after depending on the New York Times bestseller list last year and not getting the book he was expecting (funny story … he pulled over, called his wife and said, “Have you heard about a book … 50 Shades of Something?).  When in doubt, it’s always good to ask Library staff for recommendations.

Below are a list of some of my favorites that I’d love to read again.  Some are new and some are older.  Many I have have listened to while others (A Paris Apartment) were so good I wasn’t patient enough to listen to them so I either downloaded the eBook or checked out the print book.  You can’t go wrong with any of these titles.

Happy reading and listening!

Blum, Jenna

 

Those Who Save Us

What would you do to survive during a war? What if what you did elicits a legacy of shame?   Jenna Blum explores these themes through the stories of Anna Schlemmer, a German woman who survived WWII in Germany and her daughter, who is now a professor of German history in the United States. The story is a mother/daughter drama about love, passion, survival, and choices.

 

 

Bodensteiner, Carol

 

Go Away Home & Growing Up Country

Carol Bodensteiner is an Iowa author from Des Moines. Her first book (Growing Up Country) is a memoir of growing up on an Iowa dairy farm. From milking cows to giving a 4-H presentation, it captures rural farm life from a bygone era. It is also a wonderful book for our Iowa City Hospice reading partnership where volunteers present programs planned to help residents of care centers focus on memories. Go Away Home is Historical Fiction and also has a rural setting and captures the hopes and dreams in a coming-of-age story about a young woman from Iowa.

 

 

Dallas, Sandra

 

Prayers for Sale & The Bride’s House

Sandra Dallas is a versatile author. Although all her books can be characterized as Historical Fiction, they are all different. Stories include Pioneer life in Colorado (Diary of Mattie Spenser), Gilded Age life in Denver (Fallen Women), and the lives of Mormons starting out in Iowa City and traveling to Salt Lake City (True Sisters). All books are recommended but Prayers for Sale, set in the mountains near Breckenridge, CO and The Bride’s House, set in Georgetown, CO, are my favorites.

 

 

Doerr, Anthony

 

All the Light We Cannot See

Set in World War II, it is the story of Marie-Laure, a young French girl who lost her eyesight when she was six and must escape from Paris with her father during WWII. It is also the story of Werner, a young German boy who has a special talent for building and fixing radios. As the war rages, Marie-Laure and Werner cross paths. Doerr received a National Book Award nomination for this book.

 

 

Gable, Michelle

 

A Paris Apartment

The stories of two women in Paris. One is a modern-day Sotheby’s furniture specialist (April Vogt) and the other is renowned courtesan during the Belle Époque period in Paris just before World War I (Marthe de Florian). April is summoned to Paris and jumps at a chance to escape her crumbling life in the United States. In Paris she discovers an apartment that has been shuttered for more than 70 years and full of priceless furniture and paintings collected by Marthe but abandoned by her family.

 

 

Glass, Julia

 

Three Junes & And the Dark, Secret Night

All of Julia Glass’ books are recommended but these two are my favorite. I first read Three Junes while I was in Positano, Italy looking out over the Mediterranean. I was swept away by the compelling story, lyrical writing, and strong characters. I was happily surprised when her newest book was a sequel to the story that started in Three Junes. Julia Glass’ novels feature strong characters and compelling plots that make the reader want more books from this author!

 

 

Hillenbrand, Laura

 

Unbroken

The true story of Olympic runner Louis Zamperini.   He enlisted in the US Army Air Forces in 1941. When the plane he was assigned to crashes into the South Pacific, Louis survives the crash and 47 days at sea in a plastic life raft. He was captured by the Japanese and sent to a labor camp. I refer to this books as the, “I will never complain about anything ever again book.” An older title but highly recommended.

 

 

Horan, Nancy

 

Loving Frank & Under the Wide and Starry Sky

Readers fell in love with Horan’s Loving Frank, a fictionalized story that captures the life of Frank Lloyd Wright and his second wife. Under the Wide and Starry Sky is the fictionalized story of Robert Lewis Stevenson and his American wife, Fanny Van de Grift Osbourne. The story takes readers around the globe and, like Loving Frank, centers on the love story between the main characters.

 

 

McLain, Paula

 

The Paris Wife

The fictional story of Ernest Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley Richardson. After a whirlwind courtship the couple marries and moves to Paris so Ernest can pursue his writing career. The Hemingways are drawn into Parisian life and meet many other writers and artists. There is a constant friction, though, between Ernest the writer and Ernest the husband.

 

 

Orringer, Julie

 

The Invisible Bridge

Sometimes books come along and leave a lasting impression, forcing the reader to ruminate about events and characters long after the book is done. This is one of those books. Andras and Tibor Levy are Jewish brothers who grew up in a small village in Hungary. It is the 1930′s and both aspire to do great things. The book focuses on Andras, his adventures and studies in Paris, and the relationship he establishes with the mysterious Klara Morgenstern, a Hungarian ballet instructor.

 

 

Rosnay, Tatiana de

 

Sarah’s Key & The House I Loved

Tatiana de Rosnay’s writing features solid characters, a strong sense of place, and a time of significant historical events.   Sarah’s Key is unforgettable and haunting. It begins with the Vel’ d’Hiv roundup of Jews in German-occupied Paris in 1942 and contrasts that story with a modern-day American journalist living in Paris. The House I Loved is a fictionalized story of Rose Bazelet and her opposition to the destruction of her family home during Haussman’s renovation of Paris, 1853-1870. Haussman’s radical plan was criticized for the large-scale destruction it caused; however, in recent times he has been credited with establishing Paris as a modern city.

 

 

Rutherfurd, Edward

 

Paris

Rutherfurd presents a multigenerational story that moves between time, character, and story. With Paris as the background, this approach brings characters to life, presents an understanding of historical events, and makes this reader really want to visit Paris and explore the geographical areas of the story.   I also want to read Rutherfurd’s other stories including London and New York.

 

 

See, Lisa

 

Shanghai Girls, Dreams of Joy & China Dolls

Lisa See’s books are full of details, family, love and complications. The characters are well developed, there’s a strong sense of place, and the reader cares about the characters and their journey. Shanghai Girls, and its sequel, Dreams of Joy, take readers on a journey from China to California and back again. China Dolls focuses on the 1930’s and 1940’s Chop-Suey Circuit in the entertainment world and focuses on three girls from diverse backgrounds who form a strong bond.

 

 

Vreeland, Susan

 

Clara and Mr. Tiffany

Because of this book, I went to New York City to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and other places to see Tiffany Glass.   Fictionalized story of Clara Driscoll who worked with Louis Comfort Tiffany at his New York studio and possibly the person who conceived the idea for the iconic Tiffany stained glass lamps. Set with the turn-of-the-century New York City backdrop with issues such as the rise of labor unions, women in the workplace, and advances in technology.

 

 

Zevin, Gabrielle

 

Storied Life of A.J. Fikry

A.J. Fikry owns a book store and he loves books. He’s not just any bookseller, though. He is picky, contrite, a wee bit arrogant, and has poor customer service skills. Despite these faults, he has a passion for books and a capacity to love. When his life takes turns he never imagined, and A.J. Fikry finds himself in the depths of despair, his redemption is his capacity to love. And love is what makes this book so wonderful. A love for people, community, literature, and most of all, a love of family.

 

 

Zoning in on Zinio

by on October 22nd, 2014

Last week I heard about an interesting article in the newest Rolling Stone magazine. (An interview with the creator of Adventure Time? Yes, please!) I wanted to read the article but didn’t have time to come to the library specifically to sit and read a magazine. (Though I usually look for any excuse to spend time in our atrium – Look how cozy and beautiful it is!)

Atrium

I had vaguely heard about ICPL’s digital magazine stand in the past; I decided now was the time to finally learn to use it. I was afraid it would be complicated, slow, and an all-around hassle. I happily learned, though, that this was not the case at all. From this page on our website, I learned how to access our Digital Magazine Stand, Zinio, on computers as well as personal devices. The service allows you to set up your own personal Zinio account where you can download magazines and sync your devices. During my 15 minute work break I learned about Zinio, created my own account using a computer, downloaded the most recent Rolling Stone to that account, downloaded the Zinio app on my tablet, logged in, and began reading about the creator of one of my favorite TV shows! Now, before I fall asleep at night, I am able to read my favorite magazines on my tablet in the comfort of my own bed. My only disappointment: Realizing I could have been enjoying free magazine downloads for months!

Zinio Page

I was astounded by the amount and the variety of magazines available through the Library’s Zinio service. Whether you’re looking to keep up on your entertainment news or you’re interested in the latest literary publications, ICPL’s Zinio selection has something for you.

  • Searching for new fall recipes to try? Check out the cooking magazines – More recipes can be found in the Home section.
  • There are several Health and Fitness magazines available to download for those who are looking to keep fit even as the weather grows colder.

If you’re like me, you’ll find TOO many magazines on Zinio!

Read and pedal

by on October 17th, 2014

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

My oldest daughter is nine and she’s a super reader. She’ll be still for long periods of time and the book is all she needs. My other daughter is on her way to being a super reader too, but the being still part is tough. Part of it is her age, she’s six, but part of it is just who she is. Jumping, kicking, punching the air, or striking a pose is what she’s doing.

So I read this article about children riding exercise bikes in school while reading. There’s more on the program here. Apparently, kids like it and it helps them learn. There’s not enough research presented to satisfy a skeptic, but it fits with my experience of listening to books or podcasts while exercising. It’s a good combination.

Imagine if we had these in your school or here in ICPL. My six-year-old would love it. Maybe yours would too.

It’s the weekend!

by on October 17th, 2014

2014 10 17 read all dayIt’s the weekend and I’m reading two great books … and I can’t wait to get back to them.  I know there are soccer games, football games, house chores, and other activities, but I really would prefer to just read all weekend.  Who wants to join me?

A Paris Apartment by Michelle Gable is based on true events and tells the story of two women in Paris.  One is a modern-day Sotheby’s furniture specialist (April Vogt) and the other is renowned courtesan during the Belle Époque period in Paris just before World War I (Marthe de Florian).  April is summoned to Paris and jumps at a chance to escape her crumbling life in the United States.  In Paris she discovers an apartment that has been shuttered for more than 70 years and full of priceless furniture and paintings collected by Marthe but abandoned by her family.  April also meets a solicitor who agrees to share Marthe’s journals.  Through these journals, April learns about the woman behind the collections.

I’m also reading Anthony Doerr’s All the Light We Cannot See.  This historical fiction novel is set in occupied France during World War II and is the story of Marie-Laure, a young French girl who lost her eyesight when she was six and lives with her father who is a locksmith at the Museum of Natural History in Paris.  It is also the story of Werner, a young German boy who has a special talent for building and fixing radios.  As the war rages, Marie-Laure and Werner cross paths.  Doerr recently received a National Book Award nomination for this book.  The writing is lyrical and foreboding and I can’t wait to start reading again.

If you are looking for a good book this weekend, head to the Library.  And remember …. You can’t read all day if you don’t start in the morning!

 

Art Purchase Prize winners

by on October 17th, 2014

The final round of judging for the 2014 Art Purchase Prize took place on Tuesday, and seven new works of original art were selected.

The winning pieces and artists are: Buffalo Bill, duct tape on wood, artist Jaimie Tucker; Champagne, digital rendered 3d art, artist Jared Williams; Girl In Aqua Top, oil on canvas, artist Bekah Ash; Magma Carta, color lithograph, artist Amanda Johnson; Raven and Untitled, monoprint, artist Cheryl Graham; and Untitled, charcoal, artist Maureen Jennings.

The new artworks will be on display on the North Wall of the second floor during the months of December and January, and then they will go into the Art To Go collection of circulating art. Patrons may place holds on the art while they are on display.

Congratulations to the winners, and many thanks to all artists who participated in this year’s contest. The Art Purchase Prize is an annual contest to purchase original art by local artists, and is funded by gifts from the Library Board and the Library Friends Foundation.

Buffalo Bill2014   Champagne2014    Girl In Aqua Top2014  Magma Carta2014 Raven2014      Untitled2014b     Untitled2014

ICPL hosts Affordable Care Act Series

by on October 16th, 2014

The Iowa City Public Library is co-sponsoring a series of Affordable Care Act information and enrollment sessions in November and December coinciding with open enrollment. With the help of certified Planned Parenthood Navigator Karen Wielert, the Library hopes to help everyone in the community better understand the ramifications of the law and help those currently uninsured obtain health care coverage.ACA-Poster

Under the Affordable Care Act, all United States citizens and non-citizens with a qualifying immigration status are required to have health coverage for the entire year of 2014 or pay a penalty. This penalty will be assessed when individuals file their 2014 income taxes. The Library’s “Understanding the Affordable Care Act” series aims to help both the uninsured and insured know how the law will impact them.

From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 15, insured individuals can come and learn about the standards health plans must meet to comply with the Act, and learn how to determine if their current plan is considered affordable or if they qualify for Marketplace coverage.

Sessions from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 29 and Dec. 6will focus on how to assess tax penalties for not having coverage, determine if an individual qualifies for a penalty exemption, and underlines the kinds of plans available based on income. After each session, individuals are encouraged to ask questions or seek assistance enrolling in the Marketplace.

“These sessions will give consumers the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the Affordable Care Act and the importance of having health insurance. I am looking forward to being able to help consumers enroll in affordable coverage that will meet their needs,” Wielert said.

All sessions of this series will be held in the ICPL’s Computer Lab on the second floor. These sessions are free.

For more information about this program, visit www.icpl.org or call the Library at (319) 356-5200.

Popo’s Halloween and Spooky tales

by on October 16th, 2014

Saturday, October 25th marks our annual Popo’s Puppet Festival.  Joining us this year along with our favorite clown, Popo, are Jester Puppets and a rendition of Bony Legs by Buffy Quintero.   Bony Legs also known as Baba Yaga, follows little Sasha as she goes to borrow a needle and thread from her witch of a neighbor.  Will Sasha find a way to escape the horrifying Baba Yaga before she gets made into dinner? Stop by the library from 10-12 to find out and for other wonderfully creepy and fun shows for the entire family to enjoy.

As the holiday approaches and our collection of jHoliday books begins to dwindle keep the following titles in mind for spooky reading

Bony LegsBrown: A Dark, Dark Tale, Chaperon: Eerie Dearies, Cole: Bony Legs, Cyrus: Your Skeleton is Showing, Ehlert: Boo to You!, Gorey: The Gashlycrumb Tinies, Idle:Zombelina, Kohara: Ghosts in the House & The Midnight Library, Rohmann: Pumpkinhead, Schwartz: A Dark, Dark Room, Van Allsburg: The Witch’s Broom, Wilson, Who Goes There?

For more spooky titles outside of the Halloween collection, stop by the children’s department!

"I is for Insomnia"

“I is for Insomnia”

 

 





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